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User Name: DavidLearn
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Saturday, October 10, 2020 11:33:51 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Do you agree with the examples and explanations?
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 12:09:19 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!
I put my comment on Dropbox before really reading what you said here, so I sort of repeated the "going into details, diagrams, and examples:" bit.

It looks great.

Hi Drag0n,
I DO appreciate your comments.

David.
Topic: Do you agree with the examples and explanations?
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 11:38:13 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi David.
I think that they are great. The examples showing positive and negative is a good idea

Thanks a lot, Drag0n.
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
The only objection I have is to the last comment "Maybe overall the explanation is a lot easier, past is past and present perfect is present."
I just added this comment for the thread. Anxious
[quote=Drag0nspeaker] To me, the perfect (present perfect) verb shows an action in the past but, as you put it, shows the present-time relevance. It connects past and present.
I know you know this - it's just the wording I don't like really.

It probably comes from my early education which listed the tenses as when the action occurred - past, present or future:
Past - simple past, perfect, pluperfect
Present - present tense
Future - simple (will), simple (going to), perfect (will), perfect (going to)
(plus progressives for all tenses)


This is the front page for present perfect before going into details, diagrams, and examples:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/hxbya97khqqggc8/1.%20Revision%2011-15.%20Drag0n.docx?dl=0

I believe it matches the tense and its principal uses.

David.


Topic: Do you agree with the examples and explanations?
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2020 9:19:53 AM
Hi teachers,
Do you agree with the examples and explanations?

Example in Simple Past:
Teacher: Tell me about the book you read (last week), Tommy.
The teacher knows when the student was supposed to have read the book, “last week”.
Tommy: Well, uhhhhmmm, she… errrm e was a… errrm, something of a lady that errrm…
Teacher: You didn’t read the book (last week), did you?

The tense doesn’t connect the past and the present. The teacher’s assumption in saying, “You didn’t read the book (last week), did you?” is in line with an action that was supposed to happen in the past: “last week”. The focus is on the past.

________________________________________________________________________

Example in Present Perfect:
Teacher: Tell me about the book you have read, Tommy.
Now is when, because of the tense, the past and the present are connected. The teacher’s assumption in saying “Tell me about the book you have read”, is in line with the expected result at the present time.
Tommy: Well, uhhhhmmm, she… errrm e was a… errrm, something of a lady that errrm…
Teacher: You haven’t read the book, have you?

Now is when, because of the tense, the past and the present are connected. The teacher’s assumption, in saying “You haven’t read the book, have you?” is in line with the present-time relevance of the past inaction. The focus is on the present.

Maybe overall the explanation is a lot easier, past is past and present perfect is present.

Thanks.
Topic: Could you correct or confirm that?
Posted: Tuesday, August 25, 2020 4:16:26 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
You're right - the original version could be misleading, as it only mentions half of the fact.


Thanks, Drag0n.

David.
Topic: Could you correct or confirm that?
Posted: Sunday, August 23, 2020 8:11:59 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!
It's a bit vague and incomplete in both versions - your version (including "state") is a bit more complete.
They're both correct, in some contexts.

Right! It's a bit vague. It's just a general idea about the present perfect. After that I use diagrams and examples to explain the different uses about the present perfect.

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I've never heard of a dynamic or action verb being called an 'event verb'.

Thanks. Internet is the land for everything. No matter if they exists or not.


Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Both the past tense and the present perfect are used to describe actions, events and states in the past. The difference is that the present perfect is used when one wants to show a connection (however vague) of the past with the present.

"I ate an egg when I was ten years old." - a past action/event viewed as "finished and done" in the past.
"I have eaten eggs." - a past action/event (or several) viewed as having some connection with the present - it makes the speaker an ovivore (egg-eater).

"I was a dancer for twenty years." - a state or "beingness" viewed as being in the past.
"I have been a dancer, a scholar, an engineer and an artist." - past states viewed as connected with the present - they all contribute to the speaker's 'experience' and current viewpoint.

Hi Drag0n,
Thanks for your explanation. I think I have quite a good picture about both tenses after months of asking and searching for information about them.

David.
Topic: Could you correct or confirm that?
Posted: Sunday, August 23, 2020 3:33:20 AM
Hello teachers,
I believe in grammar event verbs are also called dynamic or action verbs, right?
I'm asking this because I found somewhere on the net this definition:
The present perfect is used for an action or event, recent or not, that took place in the past.

To me is wrong, it should say:
The present perfect is used for an action or state, recent or not, that took place in the past.

Right?

Thanks.
Topic: Do you agree with the examples and explanations?
Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 8:22:14 AM
DaviLearn wrote:

3. The boy has been eating pizza since he was nine years old means that
(a) The boy is older than nine, but probably less than about fourteen--that is, he would still be called a boy, not a youth or teenager;
(b) He didn't eat pizza--perhaps it wasn't served to him, or perhaps he didn't care to try it--before he turned nine;
(c) he first ate pizza after his ninth birthday, and still eats it when it is served to him.
To me this is a possible meaning as well:
(d) The boy, who now may be 12 years old, will probably not be served pizza regularly every Tuesday or once a week, but perhaps on five to eight random days each month, he has pizza.

Sarrriesfan wrote:
There is nothing in that statement to suggest that he could be served pizza once a year and it would still be true. The sentence is not linked to the other sentences by anything.


Hi Sarriefan,
Thank you for your help and interest as well. Then I should find another sentence that grasps that idea.

David.




Topic: Do you agree with the examples and explanations?
Posted: Monday, August 17, 2020 3:24:28 PM
tautophile wrote:
I'm not quite sure what you're asking, but, as I read the sentences:
I want to known if the three explanations match with the examples I have given.
occasional: (1)regular, (2)regular with exceptions, or (3)irregular.


1. The boy eats pizza every Tuesday means just what it says--every Tuesday, the boy eats pizza. Of course he may eat pizza on other days too--or maybe not--but we're just talking about Tuesdays.
That is correct.

2. The boy eats pizza almost every Tuesday means that, on most Tuesdays, but not every Tuesday, the boy eats pizza. Again, he may eat pizza on other days. If there are four Tuesdays in a given month, he would probably have pizza on three of them.
That is correct as well.

3. The boy has been eating pizza since he was nine years old means that
(a) The boy is older than nine, but probably less than about fourteen--that is, he would still be called a boy, not a youth or teenager;
(b) He didn't eat pizza--perhaps it wasn't served to him, or perhaps he didn't care to try it--before he turned nine;
(c) he first ate pizza after his ninth birthday, and still eats it when it is served to him.
To me this is a possible meaning as well:
(d) The boy, who now may be 12 years old, will probably not be served pizza regularly every Tuesday or once a week, but perhaps on five to eight random days each month, he has pizza.


Sentences (1) and (2) are "related": they both refer to the boy, pizza, and Tuesdays. We would normally assume that the "boy" in sentence (1) is the same "boy" in sentence (2)...but they may be two different boys.
The boy is the same one in each sentence, just in different situations. Sorry, I should have given a name instead, let's say, "Roy."

Sentence (3) is a statement about z boy and his relationship with pizza. It says nothing about how often, or when, the boy eats pizza, but we can assume he eats it from time to time, and has done so since he was nine years old. We would probably not assume that the "boy" in this sentence is the same "boy" as in the previous sentences...but he may be, of course.

As said, he is the same boy.

]Hi tautophile,
Thanks for your help and interest.

David.
Topic: Do you agree with the examples and explanations?
Posted: Monday, August 17, 2020 9:45:35 AM
Hi teachers,
I've read this definition somewhere on the net:

We can use the present perfect continuous for actions over a period that began in the past and either has ended in the (usually recent) past or has continued until now (and may even continue into the future), and can be:

continuous: with or without interruptions, or
occasional: (1)regular, (2)regular with exceptions, or (3)irregular.

All of the above with or without since/for.

My question:
Do you agree with the examples and explanations?
1. The boy eats pizza every Tuesday. (Occasional Regular)
2. The boy eats pizza almost every Tuesday. (Regular with exceptions. There could be some missing Tuesdays)
3.The boy has been eating pizza since he was nine years old. (Occasional Irregular)
The boy will probably not be served pizza regularly every Tuesday, but perhaps on five to eight random days each month; right?

Thanks.

Topic: Do all the examples fit the explanation?
Posted: Monday, June 8, 2020 12:49:23 PM
DavidLearn wrote:
One of the uses of the simple past says:
a) It is used for an action or state, recent or not, at a definitive time in the past.

Do all these examples fit that explanation?
1. Dinosaurs lived millions of years ago.
2. She painted his room last year.
3. He arrived late at work yesterday.
4. The bus left at 7:00 am.

Isn't this one better only for sentences 1 and 2 or it also applies for all of them ?
b) When it is used with a time period, which is finished, it means that in the course of that time period the action or state happened, or didn’t happen.

[quote=FounDit]It applies to all of them. Whether it is a time period millions of years ago, or 7:00 am, the action/state is now completed.


*******************************************************
These are examples of time expressions that refer to a definite time in the past:
a year/two months/a few weeks/three days/etc. ago.
at 5 o'clock.
yesterday.
earlier today/this week/this month.
last week/month/year.

Then when we say a definitive time it doesn't matter if it's specific or general; right?
FounDit wrote:
Correct.


Hi FounDit,
Thanks for your help!

David.