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User Name: DavidLearn
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Monday, April 12, 2021 5:31:05 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: directions for an exercise
Posted: Sunday, April 11, 2021 5:24:12 PM
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi teachers,

If I have an exercise, for example the following one:
1. Is ______ _______ ___ ________? Yes, _____ _____.

Which letter is better for the directions of the exercise, "a", "b" or both?
a) Look at the pictures and complete the yes questions and answers. With this one, you might think they would fill in all the blanks, but they may only fill in the "Yes" blanks

b) Look at the pictures and fill in all the blanks to complete the yes questions and answers. With this one, there is no doubt all the blanks need to be filled, especially if you add that one word.


Hi FounDit,
I do appreciate your help! Crystal clear with the word "all". Angel


David.
Topic: directions for an exercise
Posted: Sunday, April 11, 2021 12:32:38 PM
Hi teachers,

If I have an exercise, for example the following one:
1. Is ______ _______ ___ ________? Yes, _____ _____.

Which letter is better for the directions of the exercise, "a", "b" or both?
a) Look at the pictures and complete the yes questions and answers.
b) Look at the pictures and fill in the blanks to complete the yes questions and answers.

Thanks.
Topic: Is the definition appropriate?
Posted: Wednesday, April 7, 2021 10:44:27 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
It's better like this:
To deny that this is the name of an object or an animal in singular and plural we use these no questions.

Still, can I use "negate" instead of "deny", in this case?


FounDit wrote:
I'm not sure if the object of the lesson is to understand "no" statements, or the words, "deny" and "negate". I'm going to assume the former.


The object is if it's appropriate to use "deny" or "negate" for the explanation. That's all.

FounDit wrote:
Neither negate, nor deny, seem like the best word to use here. To deny something is usually used after a statement of truth, or an accusation (he denied the accusation that he killed someone. He was first accused)

In your examples, there would first have to be the statement:
This is a dog.
This is a plate.
This is a cat.

To negate something is generally to invalidate it, or nullify it in some way. That could fit, but sounds odd as the word to use here.

I would suggest "correct", or "correctly".
To "correct" the name of an object, or an animal, in singular and plural we use these no questions.

To "correctly" identify an object, or an animal, in the singular and plural, we use "no" questions.

Is this a plate? No, it is not. It's a glass.
Are these plates? No they aren't, They're glasses.
Is this a dog? No, it isn't. it is a cat.
Are these dogs? No they aren't. They are cats.


Hi FounDit,
Very interesting explanation of yours. I really thought both were interchangeable for the explanation. Anxious

David.
Topic: Is the definition appropriate?
Posted: Wednesday, April 7, 2021 6:49:46 AM
It's better like this:
To deny that this is the name of an object or an animal in singular and plural we use these no questions.

Still, can I use "negate" instead of "deny", in this case?

David.
Topic: Is the definition appropriate?
Posted: Wednesday, April 7, 2021 3:18:25 AM
Hi teachers,
The Oxford dictionary says that ''negate'' can mean ''to state that something does not exist''. That said, can I use "negate" instead of "deny" in my definition?
To deny the name of an object or an animal in singular and plural we use these no questions.

Examples:
Is this a plate? No, it is not. It's a glass.
Are these plates? No they aren't, They're glasses.
Is this a dog? No, it isn't. it is a cat.
Are these dogs? No they aren't. They are cats.

Thanks.
Topic: Are both explanations correct?
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 2:08:59 PM
FounDit wrote:
[quote=DavidLearn]Hi teachers,
Trying ti explain and differentiate simple past with the present perfect.
Situation.
Tom: I lost my keys.
Lisa: When did you?

Explanations:
a) The focus is on the action that took place in the past with no present state of that action and there is not an implied present consequence.
b) The focus is on the action that took place in the past with no present state of that action and no implied present consequence.

Accepting that the explanations are right, are both explanations correct?
Yes. This statement of fact tends to focus the mind on the time when the keys were lost in the past. You tend to think about when it happened in the past.

The idea is to differentiate simple past and present perfect which is this other example:
Tom: I have lost my keys.
Lisa: Now what?
This statement tends to focus the mind on the present, and looking back at the completed fact of losing the keys. You realize, in the present, something that happened in the past.



Hi FounDit,
I appreciate your reply. Then both explanations, "a" and "b" make sense completely.

David.
Topic: Are both explanations correct?
Posted: Wednesday, January 13, 2021 6:07:08 AM
Hi teachers,
Trying ti explain and differentiate simple past with the present perfect.
Situation.
Tom: I lost my keys.
Lisa: When did you?

Explanation:
a) The focus is on the action that took place in the past with no present state of that action and there is not an implied present consequence.
b) The focus is on the action that took place in the past with no present state of that action and no implied present consequence.

Accepting that the explanations are right, are both explanations correct?

The idea is to differentiate simple past and present perfect which is this other example:
Tom: I have lost my keys.
Lisa: Now what?

Thanks.
Topic: Is it really necessary to use "just" in both sentences?
Posted: Friday, January 8, 2021 11:51:42 AM
Under the circumstances of Tom saying,
"I have lost my keys and...",
I would agree with you, but your original statement by Tom was that he simply said,
"I lost my keys and...",
not "I have lost my keys and...". That was my mistake.

It could still be ambiguous. Much would depend on what follows those words, "True"
"I lost my keys and I can't open the door",
"I have lost my keys and couldn't open the door twice before".
or "I lost my keys and had to get new ones made".



Right, other examples could be:
I have lost my keys and now I can’t get into my house.
I have lost my keys and now I have to call my sister for extra keys.
I have lost my keys and now I have to call the locksmith.



Topic: Is it really necessary to use "just" in both sentences?
Posted: Friday, January 8, 2021 10:13:14 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
I have simplified the exercise after your commentaries. Does it look better now?

Scenario: Tom and Lisa are walking to his house and only a few seconds away from his front door he says, “I lost my keys and… ”.

According to what Tom says, what do you think is more likely?
a) He has just noticed his keys are missing, and (he) is using the wrong tense.
b) He simply wants to tell her the story about when he lost his keys a week ago, and (he) is using the correct tense.

To me, both "a" and "b" are correct. On second thought... No, they are not.

I'm not entirely sure what your question is.
The problem as I see it is that what Tom says, “I lost my keys and… ”, doesn't convey any sense of urgency over the loss of keys, or if he is simply wanting to relate a time when he lost his keys.

Assuming the question is about the tense of the word "lost", adding additional information wouldn't affect that. So Tom could have said, "I've just realized I've lost my keys." That would imply an immediate problem, a) fits and the word "lost" is fine.

If, however, Tom says, "I've lost my keys before...", he is simply relating a story about that, then b) fits and the tense of the word "lost" remains the same, and again is fine.


Somehow, I wanted both "a" and "b" to be correct. That's impossible.
If I say "... his front door he says, “I lost my keys and… ”. The only possible answer is "b": He simply wants to tell her the story about when he lost his keys a week ago, and (he) is using the correct tense.

***********************************

Scenario: Tom and Lisa are walking to his house and only a few seconds away from his front door he says, “I have lost my keys and… ”.
Here, again, this simple introduction doesn't convey which idea is being communicated, and extra words are necessary to convey that.

If Tom says, "I've lost my keys and we can't get into the house", then a) fits and the tense is fine.

If Tom says, "I've lost my keys before and...", then b) fits and he's telling her a story. Once again the tense is fine.

According to what Tom says, what do you think is more likely?
a) He, suddenly, has just noticed his keys are missing and (he) is using the correct tense.
b) He simply wants to tell her last week’s story and (he) is using the wrong tense.


To me, both "a" and "b" are correct. On second thought... No, they are not.

If I say "... his front door he says, “I have lost my keys and… ”. The only possible answer is "a": He, suddenly, has just noticed his keys are missing and (he) is using the correct tense.

Thanks for your help as well, FounDit.

David.
Topic: Is it really necessary to use "just" in both sentences?
Posted: Wednesday, January 6, 2021 5:26:54 PM
I have simplified the exercise after your commentaries. Does it look better now?

Scenario: Tom and Lisa are walking to his house and only a few seconds away from his front door he says, “I lost my keys and… ”.

According to what Tom says, what do you think is more likely?
a) He has just noticed his keys are missing, and (he) is using the wrong tense.
b) He simply wants to tell her the story about when he lost his keys a week ago, and (he) is using the correct tense.

To me, both "a" and "b" are correct.

***********************************

Scenario: Tom and Lisa are walking to his house and only a few seconds away from his front door he says, “I have lost my keys and… ”.

According to what Tom says, what do you think is more likely?
a) He, suddenly, has just noticed his keys are missing and (he) is using the correct tense.
b) He simply wants to tell her last week’s story and (he) is using the wrong tense.

To me, both "a" and "b" are correct.