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Profile: DavidLearn
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User Name: DavidLearn
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Saturday, July 11, 2020 10:01:01 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Do all the examples fit the explanation?
Posted: Monday, June 8, 2020 12:49:23 PM
DavidLearn wrote:
One of the uses of the simple past says:
a) It is used for an action or state, recent or not, at a definitive time in the past.

Do all these examples fit that explanation?
1. Dinosaurs lived millions of years ago.
2. She painted his room last year.
3. He arrived late at work yesterday.
4. The bus left at 7:00 am.

Isn't this one better only for sentences 1 and 2 or it also applies for all of them ?
b) When it is used with a time period, which is finished, it means that in the course of that time period the action or state happened, or didn’t happen.

[quote=FounDit]It applies to all of them. Whether it is a time period millions of years ago, or 7:00 am, the action/state is now completed.


*******************************************************
These are examples of time expressions that refer to a definite time in the past:
a year/two months/a few weeks/three days/etc. ago.
at 5 o'clock.
yesterday.
earlier today/this week/this month.
last week/month/year.

Then when we say a definitive time it doesn't matter if it's specific or general; right?
FounDit wrote:
Correct.


Hi FounDit,
Thanks for your help!

David.


Topic: Do all the examples fit the explanation?
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2020 10:56:14 AM
Hi teachers,
One of the uses of the simple past says:
a) It is used for an action or state, recent or not, at a definitive time in the past.

Do all these examples fit that explanation?
1. Dinosaurs lived millions of years ago.
2. She painted his room last year.
3. He arrived late at work yesterday.
4. The bus left at 7:00 am.

Isn't this one better only for sentences 1 and 2 or it also applies for all of them ?
b) When it is used with a time period, which is finished, it means that in the course of that time period the action or state happened, or didn’t happen.

*******************************************************
These are examples of time expressions that refer to a definite time in the past:
a year/two months/a few weeks/three days/etc. ago.
at 5 o'clock.
yesterday.
earlier today/this week/this month.
last week/month/year.

Then when we say a definitive time it doesn't matter if it's specific or general; right?

Thanks.


Topic: A state that was in progress until now?
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 10:51:23 AM
Let me rephrase my question. I'm saying that we can use the present perfect with the prepositions since or for to express also an action that was in progress for a period of time until now. Like for example:
I have painted three rooms since this morning.

Is it also possible to do that expressing a state?

FounDit wrote:
Yes, it's possible. You could have such states as:

She has been alive for 50 years.

He has been in exile since 1990.

She has been blind since the day she was born.


Got that, FounDit.


Topic: A state that was in progress until now?
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2020 11:24:01 AM
DavidLearn wrote:

We use the present perfect:
With the prepositions since or for to express an action that is (1), or was (2), in progress for a period of time until now.

1a. She has worked in this office for twenty years.
1b. He has lived in NY since 2012.
2a. I have painted three rooms since this morning.

*********************************
I can think of a state that is in progress for a period of time until now, but not one that was in progress until now.
Eg.
She has known him for twenty years.
They have had their house since 2005.

Can we also use the present perfect with the prepositions since or for to express a state that was in progress for a period of time until now?
I can't think of any examples, are there?
Can you help me on this matter?

FounDit wrote:
I'm a bit confused by this. Do you mean using the present perfect to describe a state, using since or for, that was in progress for a period of time, but is not now?


Hi FounDit,
Let me rephrase my question. I'm saying that we can use the present perfect with the prepositions since or for to express also an action that was in progress for a period of time until now. Like for example:
I have painted three rooms since this morning.

Is it also possible to do that expressing a state?

David.
Topic: A state that was in progress until now?
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2020 4:26:38 AM
Hi teachers,
We use the present perfect:
With the prepositions since or for to express an action that is (1), or was (2), in progress for a period of time until now.

1a. She has worked in this office for twenty years.
1b. He has lived in NY since 2012.
2a. I have painted three rooms since this morning.

*********************************
I can think of a state that is in progress for a period of time until now, but not one that was in progress until now.
Eg.
She has known him for twenty years.
They have had their house since 2005.

Can we also use the present perfect with the prepositions since or for to express a state that was in progress for a period of time until now?
I can't think of any examples, are there?
Can you help me on this matter?

Thanks.

Topic: Could you correct or confirm the comma usage?
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 1:16:15 PM
DavidLearn wrote:
I'm not sure that the commas have to be there. Could you correct or confirm them?

FounDit wrote:
I think you can omit the one after "time period", but could keep the one before "and". You could also shorten it a bit with some rewording. Such as:
We use the present perfect:
With a time period which is not finished, and during the course of that time period, the action did or didn’t happen.
Eg.
I have studied hard this week. (Of course) Brick wall
They haven't seen her today.


Hi FounDit,
Thanks for this one as well.

David.

Topic: Could you correct or confirm the comma usage?
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 11:08:32 AM
Hi teachers,
I'm not sure that the commas have to be there. Could you correct or confirm them?

We use the present perfect:
With a time period, which is not finished, and it means that in the course of that time period, the action happened or didn’t happen.
Eg.
I have study hard this week.
They haven't seen her today.

Thanks.
Topic: Is the shorten one as good as the long one?
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 10:53:40 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
Hi teachers,
I would like to know if the shorten guideline (2) is a good as the long one (1).

FounDit wrote:
Yes, it says the same thing, although we might normally put some commas around "or were" to indicate additional information. This, of course, depends on the level of comprehension of your students, but I would think advanced students would have no problem with it.


DavidLearn wrote:
1. We use the present perfect:
With the prepositions since or for to express actions that are in progress for a period of time until now or actions that were in progress for a period of time until now.

2. We use the present perfect:
With the prepositions since or for to express actions that ARE, or WERE, in progress for a period of time until now.

Eg.
She has worked in this office for twenty years.
He has lived in NY since 2012.
I have painted three rooms since this morning.


Hi FounDit,
Thanks for your help and correction.

David.
Topic: Is the shorten one as good as the long one?
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 10:41:17 AM
Hi teachers,

I would like to know if the shorten guideline (2) is a good as the long one (1).

1. We use the present perfect:
With the prepositions since or for to express actions that are in progress for a period of time until now or actions that were in progress for a period of time until now.

2. We use the present perfect:
With the prepositions since or for to express actions that ARE or WERE in progress for a period of time until now.

Eg.
She has worked in this office for twenty years.
He has lived in NY since 2012.
I have painted three rooms since this morning.

Thanks.
Topic: Which one is correct?
Posted: Friday, May 29, 2020 11:00:22 AM
I appreciate all your replies. I have a much better picture now.

David.