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Profile: DavidLearn
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User Name: DavidLearn
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Monday, January 27, 2014
Last Visit: Monday, August 2, 2021 5:41:24 PM
Number of Posts: 4,033
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Could you tell me if the explanations in parentheses make sense?
Posted: Monday, August 2, 2021 9:58:48 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
According to the underlined word/s, could you tell me if the explanations in parentheses make sense?

FounDit wrote:
They look good to me with the exception I note below.

He sees an old man walking a dog and thinks, “If I don’t study something, that could be me (is a possibility for me) in the future, alone (with no friends) with (in the company of) only my dog. I have to make a move (take action, act). There’s no other way. I need the strength (power, force) to go very far. I’m sure I can do that (I am convinced it is possible for me). I’m sure I can”.

After that, he thinks that it’s time to go back (return) home and talk to (have a conversation with) his aunt, Ms. Taylor, about his idea. He is sure (convinced) that she will support (emotionally animate encourage/agree) his plans.

Ms. Taylor usually gives him good advice (guidance, recommendation). Only a couple of more minutes and he will be home. He is very excited (enthusiastic) to tell (inform) Ms. Jones about his new plans.


I am so thankful for all your help and corrections, FounDit.

Topic: Is the sentence correct?
Posted: Monday, August 2, 2021 9:54:51 AM
tautophile wrote:
In my opinion, your sentence "I have a picture of a man showing with two balloons exactly what the sentence below expresses:" isn't a good sentence. I gather that what you have is a cartoon of a man, such as you might find in a comic strip. Above him are two "thought-balloons" (cloud-shaped blank spaces in which his thoughts are expressed in words; like "speech balloons", thought-balloons are a convention in cartooning). In one of the thought-balloons, his thoughts concern his future. He might be thinking, "What ought I to do? Get some more education?" In the other thought-balloon, his thought might be, "I know! I'll take that on-line course in [some subject or other thst he's considering]. That'll help me get a job."

I would recommend you revise the two sentences to something like "I have a cartoon of a man sitting and thinking about his future. In the cartoon, he is considering taking an online course, or "... about his future. Thought-balloons in the cartoon reveal that he is considering taking an online course."


I do appreciate the corrections, tautophile.

tautophile wrote:
I wonder: Is this a cartoon you drew yourself?

In a way it isn't. I take pictures from a paid web page and I modify them with a professional software.

Topic: Could you tell me if the explanations in parentheses make sense?
Posted: Monday, August 2, 2021 9:45:26 AM
Hi teachers,
According to the underlined word/s, could you tell me if the explanations in parentheses make sense?

He sees an old man walking a dog and thinks, “If I don’t study something, that could be me (is a possibility for me) in the future, alone (with no friends) with (in the company of) only my dog. I have to make a move (take action, act). There’s no other way. I need the strength (power, force) to go very far. I’m sure I can do that (I am convinced it is possible for me). I’m sure I can”.

After that, he thinks that it’s time to go back (return) home and talk to (have a conversation with) his aunt, Ms. Taylor, about his idea. He is sure (convinced) that she will support (emotionally animate) his plans.

Ms. Taylor usually gives him good advice (guidance, recommendation). Only a couple of more minutes and he will be home. He is very excited (enthusiastic) to tell (inform) Ms. Jones about his new plans.

Thanks.




Topic: Is the sentence correct?
Posted: Sunday, August 1, 2021 11:27:56 AM
DavidLearn wrote:
I have a picture of a man showing with two balloons exactly what the sentence below expresses:
Here, a man is thinking about his future and thinking about taking an online course.

My two questions:
1. Is the sentence correct? It looks good to me.

2. Do I need the comma after "here" because immediately after there is the subject? Yes, because the word "here" is being used as an introduction to what follows. It has the sense of, "Here (in this picture)...", but since these words are omitted, we pause a moment for the introduction, or something presented.


Great! I value and respect your comments, FounDit.

Topic: Is the sentence correct?
Posted: Sunday, August 1, 2021 6:32:10 AM
Hi teachers,
I have a picture of a man showing with two balloons exactly what the sentence below expresses:
Here, a man is thinking about his future and thinking about taking an online course.

My two questions:
1. Is the sentence correct?
2. Do I need the comma after "here" because immediately after there is the subject?

Thanks.

Topic: Could you correct or confirm this guide-line?
Posted: Monday, July 26, 2021 11:54:53 AM
tautophile wrote:
BTW, "guideline" in this context is a single word, not "guide-line" or "guide line".


Thanks for your interest as well, tautophile.


Topic: Could you correct or confirm this guide-line?
Posted: Monday, July 26, 2021 11:53:10 AM
FounDit wrote:
[quote=DavidLearn]Hi teachers,
Could you correct or confirm this guide-line? Can the guide-line be shorter?

To make the possessive noun of two or more proper nouns, add ’s on the last proper noun except if it ends in “s” where you can add ’s or only the apostrophe () to the end of the proper noun.

Examples:
This is Carla and Joe’s restaurant.
That is Mary and Peter’s dog.
They are Paul, Rudy, and Ines’s / Ines offices.


FounDit wrote:
It looks right to me. I don't see how you could make it shorter unless you make it into a list, but even at that, it would be about the same length.


Thanks for your help and comments, FounDit.



Topic: Is this small paragraph correct?
Posted: Monday, July 26, 2021 11:46:39 AM
FounDit wrote:
[quote=DavidLearn]Is this small paragraph properly written?

Dear XXX,
Could you help me, please?
I am in the department of supervision and training and I have not understood really well the fields that I have to fill in on the attached table. I am requesting a signature for edcs. Sorry for the inconveniences.


FounDit wrote:
It looks good to me, but if the department is a proper title, you might capitalize it. Also, I added "on" as it made it more clear, I thought. As an alternative wording for one of your sentences, you could say,
"I am in the Department of Supervision and Training and I do not clearly understand the fields I need to fill in on the attached table...".

I appreciate the correction.

FounDit wrote:
[b]I'm guessing the recipient will understand what you mean by "understand the fields I need to fill in". It isn't clear to me by that wording whether you are having difficulty with the information needed for the fields, or the fields themselves.


[color=blue]Yes, the recipient will understand that.




Topic: Is this small paragraph correct?
Posted: Monday, July 26, 2021 5:43:06 AM
Hi teachers,

Is this small paragraph properly written?

Dear XXX,
Could you help me, please?
I am in the department of supervision and training and I have not understood really well the fields that I have to fill in the attached table. I am requesting a signature for edcs. Sorry for the inconveniences.

Thanks.
Topic: Could you correct or confirm this guide-line?
Posted: Monday, July 26, 2021 3:52:59 AM
Hi teachers,
Could you correct or confirm this guide-line? Can the guide-line be shorter?

To make the possessive noun of two or more proper nouns, add ’s on the last proper noun except if it ends in “s” where you can add ’s or only the apostrophe () to the end of the proper noun.

Examples:
This is Carla and Joe’s restaurant.
That is Mary and Peter’s dog.
They are Paul, Rudy, and Ines’s / Ines offices.

Thanks.