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User Name: palapaguy
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Joined: Monday, October 28, 2013
Last Visit: Thursday, January 18, 2018 1:22:18 AM
Number of Posts: 605
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: did or had done
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 11:13:21 PM
Audiendus wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Now, say a shooter shoots someone and a police officer tackles him immediately just after he pulled the trigger. At that moment the shooter might say "I wish I didn't do it." Although he pulled the trigger one second earlier, that event was in the past.

I disagree. If the event was in the past, however recent, he should say: "I wish I hadn't done it" (although he might say "I'm sorry I did it").

"I wish I didn't do it" would only work with a habitual action, e.g:
"I sometimes bite my tongue when I am asleep. I wish I didn't do it."


Yes, I agree that "I wish I hadn't done it" is grammatically preferred and should have been used, but "I wish I didn't do it" is quite common and accepted colloquially.

But since the OP asked for the "correct" form, I must accept your point.
Topic: tense
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 10:38:41 PM
I think it's fine.
Topic: did or had done
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 9:44:27 PM
Fyfardens wrote:
Fyfardens wrote:
a) I wish I didn't do it. The speaker is expressing regret about something they do in the present time.


georgew wrote:
In (a) the speaker is expressing his feelings in the present about an event that happened (that he did) in the past.


Not if they are speaking standard English.

Let's make this clear with an obvious present-time situation:

I am in Prague. It is cold. I regret that I am not in Florida, where it is warm. I wish I were in Florida now. Some people would say 'I wish I was in Florida now' but that is not important. What is important is that we use a past-tense (preferably subjunctive) for a present irrealis situation.

If we wish to talk about a past irrealis situation, we use the past perfect: I wish I had been in Florida last week.



The issue here might be where the line between past and present is - in other words, where does the past end and the present start.

"The speaker is expressing regret about something they do in the present time." That would be expressed as "I wish I weren't doing this." or something similar. THAT's present time.

Now, say a shooter shoots someone and a police officer tackles him immediately just after he pulled the trigger. At that moment the shooter might say "I wish I didn't do it." Although he pulled the trigger one second earlier, that event was in the past.

The OP's question was:
When expressing regret of something done in the past, which of these is the correct one to say?

a) I wish I didn't do it.
b) I wish I hadn't done it.

The shot was fired immediately before the shooter was tackled. So the shot occurred the past. The most likely things he would have said to the officer are the two statements above.
Topic: "still" at the end of a sentence
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 1:30:56 AM
And then there's this classic:

allpoetry.com/poem/3805675-Man-Shoots-Wife--The-Bullet-is-in-Her-Yet--by-malmadre
Topic: did or had done
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 1:22:48 AM
No, they both occurred in the past. The only distinction is how FAR in the past.

(a) sounds more recent than (b), but (a) is still in the past. "I wish I (did not) do it." is past, no matter how recent.
Topic: "still" at the end of a sentence
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 1:10:34 AM
robjen wrote:
I am going to make up a sentence below.

(ex) After ten years, you are working for ABC Company still.

Is it wrong to put "still" at the end of any sentences? Please help me. Thanks.


An old variant of this form uses the word "yet."

Here's a modern example:
genius.com/Ragnbone-man-life-in-her-yet-lyrics
Topic: The writer Michael Viney left Dublin 13 years ago...
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:47:17 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
The writer Michael Viney left Dublin 13 years ago to live a life of peace and self-sufficiency in a remote house.


I think there should be a comma after writer and another comma after Viney. Hence, I would amend as follows: The writer, Michael Viney, left Dublin 13 years ago... . Am I correct?

Thanks.

Both forms are "correct," but the writer's style is more pleasant to read.
Topic: What is the real meaning of "inspiration" in this context? Thanks.
Posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2018 12:23:07 AM
Yes, "it" refers to the "pressure."

Whether it's a good idea about what should be done, is not known. The inspiration is to do something, but how "good" that something is, is not known. "Suddenness" is irrelevant here, I think.
Topic: What is the real meaning of "inspiration" in this context? Thanks.
Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 11:43:18 PM
Lingo wrote:
The pressure gave me more will and power. It gave me the inspiration to win.

1)What is the real meaning of "inspiration" in this context?

Thank you.

Best wishes.


An online dictionary states "inspire" means to "fill (someone) with the urge or ability to do or feel something, especially to do something creative."

I think that fits your context well.

I'll leave the rest of your question to others.
Topic: did or had done
Posted: Tuesday, January 16, 2018 11:02:43 PM
yummyspringroll wrote:
When expressing regret of something done in the past, which of these is the correct one to say?

a) I wish I didn't do it.
b) I wish I hadn't done it.

Actually, what's the difference between the two? Are they interchangeable?

thank you~


I think they're interchangeable. They mean the same thing in my opinion.

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