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Profile: palapaguy
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User Name: palapaguy
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Joined: Monday, October 28, 2013
Last Visit: Wednesday, September 18, 2019 1:29:46 AM
Number of Posts: 1,664
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: difference(s)
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2019 1:03:40 AM
Reiko07 wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Reiko07 wrote:
(1) What is the difference in connotation between astonish, amaze, and astound?

(2) What are the differences in connotation between astonish, amaze, and astound?

Which is correct? If both are correct, is there any difference in meaning/connotation?


Here, we're comparing three objects, so they must be compared in plural form for more than two objects. That means "What are the differences among ...

"Between" will often be encountered in usages like this, but I believe that's incorrect.


Thank you very much, palapaguy. I learned in school that "between" is wrong when comparing three objects; however, there are some English teachers who say that is not necessarily correct.

I tend to use "between" when comparing each pair. In my examples, I have three pairs in mind:

astonish vs. amaze
astonish vs. astound
amaze vs. astound


But your post did not suggest any pairs. Regardless of what you had "in mind," in writing you were comparing three equal-level single-word objects. Therefore, "among" is appropriate.

Topic: 'listen in English'
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2019 12:45:58 AM
BobShilling wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
An informal and respectful place for new English learners to practice speaking and listening in English.


That is not an example of 'listening in'. It's 'practice speaking and listening - in English'. The words could have been 'practice listening and speaking - in English'.


Exactly right.

Coop, you can't simply treat two words that happen to be physically adjacent - in this case "listening" and "in" - grammatically as a phrase.

Topic: comma after "opinion"?
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2019 12:25:00 AM
FounDit wrote:
Koh Elaine wrote:
“If a person has raised the alarm, in my opinion he should be given at least some assurance that; Okay, we are not going to take any action against you, even if we suppose you are involved in other cases. Help us to be part of the process to uncover this whole mess, rather than be our witness."

Should there be a comma after "opinion"?

Thanks.



I say no, because the statement about the opinion is part of the main idea, not parenthetical information.

If it is left out, then the latter part states what should, in fact, happen, not his opinion about what should happen.


I agree. No comma.

Topic: difference(s)
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2019 12:13:09 AM
Reiko07 wrote:
(1) What is the difference in connotation between astonish, amaze, and astound?

(2) What are the differences in connotation between astonish, amaze, and astound?

Which is correct? If both are correct, is there any difference in meaning/connotation?


Here, we're comparing three objects, so they must be compared in plural form for more than two objects. That means "What are the differences among ...

"Between" will often be encountered in usages like this, but I believe that's incorrect.

Topic: Word to replace 'event"
Posted: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 11:27:54 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
He met with an unfortunate event, where a blood vessel in his nose ruptured and he had to be admitted to hospital.

1. I believe 'event' is the wrong word. I cannot think of a suitable word. Could somebody tell me what is the most suitable word?
2. Would it be better if the bold words were replaced by 'hospitalised'?

Thanks.


"He met with an unfortunate event ..." is quite common in AE. Here, "event" is understood to mean something similar to an occurrence or a situation.

Now on the other hand, "... he had to be admitted to hospital" would be considered ungrammatical without an article. Anxious

Or, "hospitalized" as you suggested.

Topic: Prompted monologue
Posted: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 11:10:55 PM
A "monologue" is commonly understood to be a long, extemporaneous speech by one person without assistance/steering/prompting by another. If someone else is going to guide or steer it, it's honest to describe it as "prompted" because most people wouldn't expect a monologue to be so.

I've never encountered the term "prompted monologue" before, but that's my guess as to its meaning
Topic: didn't like him
Posted: Sunday, September 15, 2019 1:08:15 AM
azz wrote:
a. I didn't like him for talking curtly to my husband.

Can't that sentence mean two things?
1. I didn't like him and the reason was that he talked curtly to my husband.
2. It wasn't because he talked curtly to my husband that I liked him.

I think (a) is ambiguous, but if a comma is placed before 'for' then it would only have meaning (1). That's my impression, but I am not sure.

Many thanks.


Yes, it can mean two things, but I think your #1 is the common interpretation. Your #2 is a slightly tortured and unlikely interpretation. The comma you mentioned has little effect.

Topic: Which are the correct prepositions?
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 11:40:57 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
We should try to do our best to be mindful about/of constantly upholding the object of worship in/at the centre of our lives.

1. Is the sentence correct?
2. Which are the correct prepositions?

Thanks.


"Mindful of ... " is most common in my experience. But "about" is quite understandable as well.

Topic: hyphenated adjective
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 12:27:59 AM
sureshot wrote:
Atatürk wrote:
Hi,

Why do we say "a two-year-old boy" but "a two-thirds increase"?

____________________

We say "two-year-old boy" and "a two-thirds increase".

In the first case, "year" is a noun functioning as an adjective. Adjectives are not plural. In the second case "two-thirds" is a fraction. It is a unit that is taken together to convey the intended meaning. The entire expression with an "s" already exists. It is used as an adjective of "increase".


Good answer. Applause

It is most important to understand that the main purpose of English grammar is to, first, understand and then to clearly convey the meaning of thoughts.

So, spelled-out numbers are not always treated as singular or plural. "Two-year-old boy" may be hyphenated or not, depending upon context and meaning.

Grammar is not simply an analytical tool. It should not be used to analyze words separately from their meaning and then to apply rules to them as is done in science. Mastering grammar is all about learning common usage, and that is achieved through practice and interaction, not through applying rules.

Topic: A dog is the man's best friend.
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 10:43:25 PM
Reiko07 wrote:
Thank you very much, palapaguy and Bob.

I don't like that fact that the word "man" is being used in the following version:

(3) A dog is a man's best friend.

Have you seen a gender-neutral version of this sentence?


How about "A dog is someone's best friend"?

Or the form that's in vogue lately, "A dog is their best friend"?

Or even "A dog is everyone's best friend"? This one solves the gender and inclusiveness issues!

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