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User Name: palapaguy
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Joined: Monday, October 28, 2013
Last Visit: Wednesday, August 15, 2018 12:38:41 AM
Number of Posts: 1,079
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Is the comma optional?
Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 9:29:43 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
He had listed his watch on online marketplace Carousell(,) which was spotted by Misso's friend Joshua Chua Yong Cheng on Nov 30 last year.

Is the comma (in brackets) inserted by me optional?

Thanks.


It's better with the comma. It helps to set off the additional information "... which was spotted ..." adding clarity.
Topic: A group of tourists walked through the historic center
Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 1:19:02 AM
The grammar is fine. But "... they realized that it had a glorious past that contrasted with its gloomy present, abandoned to its fate." seems hyperbole to me.
Topic: Are the bold parts correct?
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 12:24:29 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 8 — Former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak today questioned Finance Minister Lim Guan Eng on why it took him three months before realising that the GST refunds trust account was missing RM18 billion.

The question is why did it take three months before the Finance Minister realised that RM18 billion was not paid (to the GST Refund trust account) and now they say the government can’t pay the refunds because they have been ‘robbed’.

Are the bold parts correct?

Thanks.


The first bold text is fine.

The second bold text also is fine, IMHO.

It could be argued that "The question is why did it take three months ..." should instead be "The question is why it took three months ...". I think the original form is better because it accurately states the original text. But both are understandable and grammatical.
Topic: starting from
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 6:12:08 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Thanks, DragOnspeaker.

starting from May 11, for submitting the false claims. (All along, I thought that it should be 'starting on...".)

I agree with you. I think things start on or at a specific time. They may continue from some time. I guess this is more a matter of logic than of grammar. Or maybe it's grammar too --- ? Think
Topic: Should it be "put on" instead?
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 4:45:10 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Quote:
"Put on" is most commonly used in AE, but I have seen "put up" often used as well, mainly by BE speakers.


That's odd - I would have said "I've heard 'put up' used occasionally - mainly by American English speakers" . . . Anxious

If a native AE speaker ever said that to me, well ..., I simply wouldn't put up with it! Not talking
Topic: Should it be "put on" instead?
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 11:17:40 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
... but I ask that Singaporeans support the EXCO (Executive Committee) so that they can put up a really good National Day Parade this year for all of us to celebrate together.”

Shouldn't it be "put on" instead?


"Put on" is most commonly used in AE, but I have seen "put up" often used as well, mainly by BE speakers.
Topic: Times
Posted: Thursday, August 9, 2018 3:58:00 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Isn't "times" redundant in the following paragraph?

"Flying nonstop can help, too: The more times you take off, the more fuel you use. According to a 2010 report from NASA, about 25 percent of airplane emissions come from landing and taking off. That includes taxiing, which is the largest source of emissions in the landing-takeoff cycle."

I think the sentence reads better without it.




"Takeoff" is an event, and it occurs some number of "times" in a flight. Technically it may be redundant in the given usage, but "times" adds clarity to what the speaker is expressing and it is commonly used in this manner.
Topic: Reach
Posted: Wednesday, August 8, 2018 2:34:08 PM
Yes. Both have the same meaning.
Topic: meaning of 'pants'
Posted: Wednesday, August 8, 2018 12:57:16 AM
Topic: where or in which
Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 11:08:33 PM
"In which" is correct.

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