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Profile: Helenej
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User Name: Helenej
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Tuesday, September 24, 2013
Last Visit: Saturday, June 30, 2018 10:06:20 AM
Number of Posts: 1,975
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 9:55:45 AM
BobShilling wrote:
It can and may extend beyond the upper front teeth for some speakers and/or in some situations

Ooh, that’s already something.

BobShilling wrote:
but it does not do so for most of us in most situations.

Has it ever occured to you to write to the respected professor that you cited and ask him to correct his explanation? If the tongue, including its tip, is beyond the upper front teeth, as you say, then it doesn’t make a contact with the edge, as the professor says.

Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 8:58:38 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
this video is not "normal life" - it is an interview - he is speaking very slowly and deliberately, so that he can be understood by all.

Prince William speaks slowly because he is thinking while speaking, not because he wants to be understood. Also, his speaking slowly means pausing between words, saying all those um, er, eh, rather than pronouncing slowly the words themselves.

Anyway, I see your point. According to you, anyone who we can see on the Internet and whose speech can be considered the proof would speak slowly and would ennunciate their th's "so that to be understood": politicians, interviewers and interviewees, actors, singers, teachers of English, weather people and so on. The only proof is you and other people that are not on the Internet.Angel
Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 8:51:25 AM
BobShilling wrote:
I should have realised that your commnon sense outweighs the opinions of native speakers and highly trained professors of phonetics.

My common sense is the same as the professor’s. He says that you touch the edge of your teeth with the tip of your tongue and that can only mean that the tip of your tongue is between your teeth and sticks out. I only wish the opinion of all native speakers coincided with the professor’s.
Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 6:42:21 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
That Canadian guy saying "Thank you" is speaking as no British person (and no Canadian) would speak in normal life. I think the same is true of most USA Americans, too.

Does Prince William speak as a British person in normal life?

Prince William

I can clearly see the tip of his tongue between his teeth. Just enlarge the screen and slow down the video.
Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 5:37:10 AM
BobShilling wrote:
What makes you feel you know better?

Common sense. If the tip of the tongue touches the edge of the teeth, it can only be further out of the mouth than the edge of the teeth. Anyone can touch the edge of the teeth with their tongue and feel with their finger which is further out, their teeth or the tip of their tongue.

Actually, Alan Cruttenden doesn't say that the tip of the tongue doesn't stick out, does he?

Prince William

Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Saturday, June 30, 2018 4:34:40 AM
BobShilling wrote:
... the tip and rims of the tongue make a light contact with the edge and inner surface [emphasis added by me added - Bob] of the upper incisors and a firmer contact with the upper side teeth. Cruttenden, Alan (2001.183-4), Gimson's Pronunciation of English. London: Arnold.

If the tip of the tongue makes a contact with the edge of the upper incisors, it means that the tip of the tongue sticks out between the teeth.
Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2018 3:22:35 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


The description is lame. It doesn't say which part of the upper front teeth the tip of the tongue touches. It touches the edge of the teeth! You can make sure of that if you slow down the following video using that gear-wheel-looking icon at the bottom.

Thank you.

Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2018 8:52:41 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
look at that picture (above) of the woman saying "through" - you can see a tiny bit of her teeth. None of her tongue at all.

The th sound is reduced in this case because it is followed by the consonant r, which requires an instant withdrawal of the tongue back to the roof of the mouth. Consider cases when th is followed by a vowel: thank, that, theory.
Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2018 8:05:10 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Absolutely NONE of my tongue goes in front of the teeth.

That's even worse. In that case people can see the whole bottom part of your tongue. Nooooo!
Topic: My friends have took
Posted: Friday, June 29, 2018 7:09:41 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
That's odd - I don't stick my tongue out when I'm saying Ɵ . . .

Yes, you do. Otherwise it's not Ɵ.Angel
th sound

Okay, not the whole tongue, only its tip, but that doesn't change my feeling about the sound.

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