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Profile: sb70012
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User Name: sb70012
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Thursday, June 6, 2013
Last Visit: Wednesday, August 3, 2022 12:26:13 PM
Number of Posts: 1,387
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: I'd like an ice cream. /vs./ I'd like ice cream.
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2022 11:26:27 AM
context: me talking with my friend in a restaurant or a coffee shop

Alex: What would you like?
Jack: I'd like ice cream.
Jack: I'd like an ice cream.

Hi,
Are both Jack's replies fine? I say to myself yes. I think both of Jack's replies are OK.

Any guidance?

Thank you.
Topic: doctor/Doctor
Posted: Sunday, May 29, 2022 1:09:36 AM
would you write "Please bring me another coffee, Waiter"?
Topic: doctor/Doctor
Posted: Friday, May 27, 2022 10:14:28 PM
Hello,
As far as I know, job titles such as "Doctor" or "officer" should be capitalized if they are used in a way to address them. But recently, on Cambridge Dictionary website I saw a weird example in which the word "doctor" isn't capitalized which it's used to address someone in an example. This is the sentence:

Do you think it’s serious, doctor?

Source: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/names-and-titles-addressing-people

I wonder why the word "doctor" isn't capitalized in the sentence above.

I find it wrong since it's been used as a title.

Any guidance?

Thank you.
Topic: Thank you, bro/Bro.
Posted: Friday, May 27, 2022 9:44:30 PM
My student told me this => Is there any resource to tell us which words are titles and which words aren't? As an English leaner, if we see words like these, then where should we refer to know more about these kinds of words to know whethere they are titles or not?

i. e. If we see words like these, how should we know whether they are titles or not? Are they listed in any dictionary under the title categories?
Topic: Thank you, bro/Bro.
Posted: Friday, May 27, 2022 1:18:46 PM
1. Thank you, bro. (friend).
2. Thank you, Bro. (friend).

Hello,
Most of the native English speakers have told me that #1 is correct and #2 is wrong since we only capitalize titles.
There is something that confuses me. As you know "Auntie, Mom, Doctor, Uncle, Dad" are often capitalized since they are titles. But "bro" can also be used as a title such as "Hey, Bro (friend). How are you?"

Then, why don't you consider it to be a title?

Topic: mailwoman/mail carrier/letter carrier (in the US)
Posted: Saturday, May 21, 2022 7:13:18 AM
Hi,
I am asking this question of Americans:

In the US if you see a female letter carrier approaching your house, then what would you call her?

Look, the mail carrier is here.
Look, the letter carrier is here.
Look, the mailwoman is here.

Which one will you say in the US in such context? Are all three fine and common in the US?

Thank you.
Topic: post lady
Posted: Friday, May 20, 2022 10:45:11 PM
Hello,
This is my understanding of the following words that which is AmE and Which is BrE:

Mailman/Mail lady is (AmE)
Letter carrier is (AmE)
Postman/postwoman is (BrE)
Courier is (AmE/BrE)
Post lady (BrE)

This is my question => Is "post lady" still used in the UK? Is it also as common as "postwoman"?

And my second question is that is "mail carrier" BrE or AmE? Is it a common word?

Thank you.
Topic: mail woman
Posted: Thursday, May 19, 2022 9:16:43 AM
Hello,
I have heard "mailman" but I have never heard "mail woman".

Do we have it in English? I mean do we have any other words to mean a female letter carrier?

Thank you.
Topic: fire woman
Posted: Thursday, May 19, 2022 9:14:44 AM
Hello,
I have heard "firefighter" and "fire man" but I have never heard "fire woman".

Do we have it in English? I mean do we have any other words to mean a female firefighter?

Thank you.
Topic: Who are they? This is my ...
Posted: Tuesday, May 17, 2022 11:19:23 AM
So, if both of us are sitting very close to the photo so that we can touch it, then "this" can also work. Depending on the distance. Right?