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Profile: meredith zita
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User Name: meredith zita
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Saturday, January 19, 2013
Last Visit: Friday, March 21, 2014 12:28:52 AM
Number of Posts: 19
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: as much
Posted: Thursday, March 20, 2014 11:57:47 PM
shivanand wrote:
Hi meredith zita,

Here, both advance and culture are to be treated as third person singular. Therefore, the inflection s/es has to be added to the verb. Your translation thus becomes: The advance of material culture does bring us much convenience but as much bother too!




Cheers!

PS: I am hesitated... is not a correct sentence!




Thanks shivanand. Should be "I'm hesitating..."Sorry about that.
Topic: as much
Posted: Thursday, March 20, 2014 11:22:07 PM
Hello everyone,
I am hesitating on the use of 'as much as'.

The idea I want to express: Material culture do bring us much convenience, but also an equal amount of bother.

My translation: The advance of material culture do bring us much convenience but as much bother too.

But I feel there must be something wrong and quite odd with my translation, did i use 'as much' appropriately? And, how can I express the idea nicely?

Thanks for answering.
Topic: '...You'll come off as a professional and confident.'
Posted: Monday, November 11, 2013 8:29:17 AM
Hi everyone:)

I saw this: '...You'll come off as a professional and confident.' in a column of a newspaper.

Is it grammatically correct? Is 'come off' a rare expression?
Also, I feel 'confident' have not used correctly here since it is an adjective.

Thanks for clarifying:).
Topic: photographing
Posted: Friday, November 8, 2013 7:44:05 AM
Hi everyone!

This is the last sentence of my resume: Enjoy cooking, cycling, photographing and travelling.

Does 'photographing' sound odd here? I intend to say that I enjoy taking photos.

Welcome your suggestions ;)
Topic: Difference(s) between '-th' & '-s'
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 8:47:57 AM
Romany, is that why there are some nouns in the form of verb+ing?
Topic: Difference(s) between '-th' & '-s'
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 8:24:02 AM
oh...I never thought that the headline is so deep!

The article is about fashion design and it affords the values of clothing. Thank you two :)!


So, because of the wordplay, the headline can literally neglect the grammar accuracy? (Since it uses 'maketh' after the plural)
Topic: Difference(s) between '-th' & '-s'
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 7:50:22 AM
I got it,DragOnspeaker, thanks.

But in the last sentence, do you mean 'Clothes maketh the man' carries the opposite meaning that clothes do not make the man?
Topic: Difference(s) between '-th' & '-s'
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013 6:46:31 AM
Hi!
I recently saw a magazine headline from SCMP: 'Clothes maketh the man'
It recalls me a question that Bible also uses '-th' in a verb, which is, however, couldn't be found in some dictionaries, so i thought this is an ancient use of '-es/s'.
Am i right? Or does it carry any special meanings with a verb?
Topic: Humans 1, Robots 0
Posted: Saturday, October 12, 2013 1:28:05 AM
IMcRout wrote:
First of all, it's a pun. It relates, for examples to a report on the progress of, say, a football match (not American), in which one team has scored a goal. It does not necessarily mean that the game is over yet or that the other team has lost - although it can. It most often is just the stating of the current score.

I do not think it has anything to do with the binary code.


Thank for your answer. um, the article once mentioned 'The human has a more pleasing, less buggy interface.' in which 'buggy' implied errors of robot's system,so what if the headline has something to deal with this jargon? what language device could it possibly relate to?
Topic: Humans 1, Robots 0
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2013 11:23:47 AM
Hi everyone!

I saw this headline in a news article from The Wall Street Journal.
Here is the source: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303492504579115310362925246.html

My Question is: If a binary code(1,0) used in a headline with a potential meaning, is it the use of intertextuality?

If not, is it a use of metonym or pun? But I assume that intertextuality means a text linked to another text, or media, but I am not sure when it related to a computer jargon. I think there should be a language device that belongs to a text when its meaning is related/leading to other specific field.

I hope I can get what exactly language devices it's belonging to. Thanks.:)