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Profile: Verbatim
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User Name: Verbatim
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Wednesday, October 3, 2012
Last Visit: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 1:47:11 PM
Number of Posts: 2,162
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: I meant to write about death, only life came breaking in as usual.
Posted: Thursday, February 27, 2020 6:15:25 PM
Daemon wrote:
I meant to write about death, only life came breaking in as usual.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


One wonders how many times "life came breaking in"
for her..... but never once in vain,
as she thought of death, as usual.
Two mental breakdowns, 1895 and nineteen fifteen,
yet she held on living with the pain.
More than a "look at things" she was let t'have seen,
by the good grace of the Merciful!

Incidentally, Diary 168 dates February 17, 1922.
Topic: Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little...
Posted: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 7:43:15 PM
Daemon wrote:
Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)


I am persuaded that this is as good as any apology for a little spinning:
it can't be helped, we are flawed.
Topic: Compromise used to mean that half a loaf was better than no bread. Among modern statesmen it really seems to mean that half a...
Posted: Sunday, February 23, 2020 1:07:01 PM
Daemon wrote:
Compromise used to mean that half a loaf was better than no bread. Among modern statesmen it really seems to mean that half a loaf is better than a whole loaf.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)


Half a loaf is better than a whole loaf, indeed, because the alternatives to a whole loaf
may be "no bread" at all or a miserable crumb.
Topic: It is cruel to discover one's mediocrity only when it is too late.
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 2:35:29 PM
Daemon wrote:
It is cruel to discover one's mediocrity only when it is too late.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)


Not too cruel, nor too late.
Once discovered, mediocrity
will let you free alacrity:
your thirst of talent sate.
Topic: I realized that ritual will always mean throwing away something; destroying our corn or wine upon the altar of our gods.
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 3:51:32 PM
Daemon wrote:
I realized that ritual will always mean throwing away something; destroying our corn or wine upon the altar of our gods.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)


The ritual is a human construct to which the tiny beings have cheekily attached the notion that the beings with immense power may be pleased by the former throwing away something.
Topic: All things are admired either because they are new or because they are great.
Posted: Saturday, February 1, 2020 3:30:42 PM
Daemon wrote:
All things are admired either because they are new or because they are great.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)


...until either one reason is mutually excluding the other.
Topic: It is the power of thought which gives man the mastery over nature.
Posted: Wednesday, January 29, 2020 5:48:14 PM
Daemon wrote:
It is the power of thought which gives man the mastery over nature.

Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875)


The mastery over nature comes with applying the power of thought well.
Topic: There's none so blind as they that won't see.
Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2020 4:36:52 PM
Daemon wrote:
There's none so blind as they that won't see.

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)


won't=will not. Choosing to ignore seeing is wont to make one blind.
Topic: We ought to see far enough into a hypocrite to see even his sincerity.
Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2020 1:04:38 AM
Daemon wrote:
We ought to see far enough into a hypocrite to see even his sincerity.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)


Perhaps a gleam of sincerity? However brief?
Topic: To found principles of government upon too advantageous an estimate of the human character is an error of inexperience, the...
Posted: Sunday, January 19, 2020 6:09:22 PM
Daemon wrote:
To found principles of government upon too advantageous an estimate of the human character is an error of inexperience, the source of which is so amiable that it is impossible to censure it with severity.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848)


To overestimate human character and then to base principles of government upon that overestimate, is an error of inexperience with a source so naively sweet that it is impossible to reprimand it.