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Profile: Verbatim
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User Name: Verbatim
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Wednesday, October 3, 2012
Last Visit: Saturday, July 11, 2020 1:27:51 PM
Number of Posts: 2,213
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Friendships begin with liking or gratitude — roots that can be pulled up.
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 1:24:52 PM
Daemon wrote:
Friendships begin with liking or gratitude — roots that can be pulled up.

George Eliot (1819-1880)


Once pulled up, the roots grow thorns and prickles.
Topic: I've been a great deal happier ... since I have given up thinking about what is easy and pleasant, and being discontented...
Posted: Thursday, July 9, 2020 6:57:03 PM
I've been a great deal happier ... since I have given up thinking about what is easy and pleasant, and being discontented because I couldn't have my own will.
Our life is determined for us—and it makes the mind very free when we give up wishing, and only think of bearing what is laid upon us, and doing what is given us to do.

George Eliot (1819-1880)

I realize that it is not always easy and pleasant,
and only think of bearing what was laid upon me,
and doing what was given me to do.
So why do I wish the load had been lighter,
and the to-do list a little slighter?Think

Our wishfull thinking, easier to give up what we aspire,
Harder to bear a load that sinks our minds in the mire.
Topic: Our fear of death is like our fear that summer will be short, but when we have had our swing of pleasure, our fill of fruit,...
Posted: Monday, July 6, 2020 1:44:42 PM
Daemon wrote:
Our fear of death is like our fear that summer will be short, but when we have had our swing of pleasure, our fill of fruit, and our swelter of heat, we say we have had our day.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


Unlike the fear of a short summer,
our fear of death can be a permanent bummer.
We may say we have had our day with the first,
but with the other we seem forever to be cursed.
Topic: People who have tried it, tell me that a clear conscience makes you very happy and contented; but a full stomach does the...
Posted: Saturday, July 4, 2020 7:35:32 PM
Daemon wrote:
People who have tried it, tell me that a clear conscience makes you very happy and contented; but a full stomach does the business quite as well, and is cheaper, and more easily obtained.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927)


In the same satirical vein, people who have tried it tell me that even a good scratch of one's back does the business quite as well.
Topic: Believe there is a great power silently working all things for good, behave yourself and never mind the rest.
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2020 1:23:58 PM
Daemon wrote:
Believe there is a great power silently working all things for good, behave yourself and never mind the rest.

Beatrix Potter (1866-1943)


The silent workings we fail to recognize sometimes, and behaving ourselves is open to interpretation.
Topic: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646)
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 4:43:27 PM
Daemon wrote:
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646)

Leibniz was a German philosopher and mathematician who greatly expanded the field of calculus. He also perfected the binary number system—the basis for modern computing—and constructed one of the first practical calculators. A jack-of-all-trades, Leibniz worked on mechanical devices, delved into the study of logic, was a historian and lawyer at times, and is considered one of the fathers of geology. In the early 1700s, he became embroiled in a controversy with Isaac Newton over what issue? More...


His controversy with Isaac Newton was over the bitter issue of who had the better looking wig.Whistle
Topic: A rich man is an honest man—no thanks to him; for he would be a double knave to cheat mankind when he had no need of it.
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 1:17:38 PM
Daemon wrote:
A rich man is an honest man—no thanks to him; for he would be a double knave to cheat mankind when he had no need of it.

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731)


And he IS a triple knave for when he gives to charity he does it for his vanity, knowing full well he had cheated the humanity, and out of inanity he wants a tax break immediately!
Topic: Accuse not Nature, she hath done her part; do thou but thine.
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 6:40:30 PM
Daemon wrote:
Accuse not Nature, she hath done her part; do thou but thine.

John Milton (1608-1674)


Aside from the context, another way to read this quotation is this:

Accept what you were endowed by nature, work with what you have been given, build on it with your own effort.
Topic: A man can never quite understand a boy, even when he has been the boy.
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2020 12:46:53 AM
Daemon wrote:
A man can never quite understand a boy, even when he has been the boy.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)


The man has never outgrown the boy?
Topic: A fearful man is always hearing things.
Posted: Sunday, June 28, 2020 8:25:36 PM
Daemon wrote:
A fearful man is always hearing things.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC)


Sophocles may have written the quoted proverb if one finds similar meaning in the following:

"To him who is in fear everything rustles."
Sophocles, Acrisius

Interesting that what fearful men hear is soft and muffled as the term rustles implies, if correctly translating the Greek word used by Sophocles.

And for another trivia, searching for the source of the posted quotation, it seems that Sophocles
may have considered "hearing things" as caused by some mental disorder. His famous phrase from Antigone
is explained by Wikipedia:

"Whom the gods would destroy ... appears in verses 620–623 of Sophocles’ play Antigone: "τὸ κακὸν δοκεῖν ποτ᾽ ἐσθλὸν τῷδ᾽ ἔμμεν' ὅτῳ φρένας θεὸς"---they first make mad. My emphasis.