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Profile: Sanmayce
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User Name: Sanmayce
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Tuesday, May 29, 2012
Last Visit: Sunday, March 28, 2021 9:00:09 AM
Number of Posts: 404
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Etymology of 'dragon'
Posted: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 4:50:24 AM
Hah, right.

Similarly, I find close DEMON-ION and DOMINION - the first being a realm of DEMONS, whereas the second "territory or people subject to a specific government or control" (taking the second usage from the superb Etymological Dictionary):
https://www.etymonline.com/word/dominion

This DOMINION second usage prompts for rethinking DEMONION as being not only the realm but as the group (i.e. demons) being subjects of .. demonic rulership, hellagood!

Another twist, there could be many a DOMINION i.e. dominions, thus the 488th entry comes:
-ion dragonions

Recently, I rewatched the whole saga of SPARTACUS (all seasons), in there the poetic dialogues were so ringy, everytime on hearing DOMINUS or DOMINA (being the household rulers) I appreciated the lost ... calling.

Now, this -ION suffix is awesome, Latin and Greek are complementing each other nicely.
Topic: Etymology of 'dragon'
Posted: Sunday, February 7, 2021 1:50:29 PM
For a long time I knew of a missing postfix, but today I made up my mind to include it despite possible misgivings.

My word is for the Greek -ion suffix.

The thing that got me started was hearing a song (used as an outro in a podcast) by the Swedish Gothic Metal Band "Therion".

Instantly, I recalled Hyperion - the Atlas "The Great One", surely, after looking up Wiktionary, we see the double-beauty of it:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-%CE%B9%CE%BF%CE%BD

- A noun-forming diminutive suffix.
- Suffix forming names for places.

Therion is a prime example for the second usage, whereas the second formation is used in:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E1%BC%B0%CF%87%CE%B8%CF%85%CE%B5%E1%BF%96%CE%BF%CE%BD#Ancient_Greek

Etymology[edit]
From ἰχθύς (ikhthús, “fish”) +‎ -εῖον (-eîon, “-shop, -market”)

Noun[edit]
ἰχθυεῖον • (ikhthueîon) n (genitive ἰχθύδιον); second declension

fish-market

Given the sign of Jesus, we can derive from Ἰησοῦς the Iisous-ion or Iesous-ion, interestingly what can it be mapped onto! My first guess is ... the-anointed-one, shoker.

I find morphology fascinating, the beautiful Japanese word 'Masakari' could be strengthened to 'Masakarion', love it.
Strange, in Bulgarian 'Sekira' denoting 'broad axe' sounds quite close to the Japanese word, thus another gem was coined: 'Sekirion'.

So, the next beauty enriches the DRAGON roster, being the 487th entry:

-ion dragonion

Hm, it could be both - the name (the dragon one) and the realm (place of dragons).
Topic: MASAKARI: The people's choice 'General Purpose Grade' English wordlist
Posted: Friday, February 5, 2021 10:42:09 PM
My never-ending quest "Textual Madness" continues, in fact it never stops, just was "sidetracked" for a while doing some search/compress dive-ins (writing the fastest (both vector and scalar) exact searcher - searching at 30GB/s, as unbelievable as it sounds see here: https://www.overclock.net/threads/cpu-benchmark-finding-linus-torvalds.1754066/page-2#post-28681743)
As a result I got reenergized and my wish to offer one simplistic, yet powerful, GUI (Graphical User Interface) assisting/sidekicking the English Language Lovers, resulted in writing Masakari - the textual viewer/browser allowing (in the near future) users to get statistics, unigram checking (i.e. spell-checking), bi-gram and tri-gram checking (a.k.a. phrase-checking), also to use transparently the fastest (no kidding) exact/wildcard/fuzzy searchers, from the GUI without bothering the viewer with loading resultant files (from searches) into other programs. Hope, this year will be most productive, GUI-wise.

Two weeks ago, by-chance, I have found QB64, a wonderful project by the superb programmer Galleon (I bend a knee before him) who resurrected an old compiler (QuickBasic) by writing a nifty IDE and compiler which translates the "old code" into C++ thus enabling it to run on Windows, Linux and MacOS, being a cross-platform, that is. It is important to have one tool, as Masakari, operating/serving regardless of the platform while looking the same on all of them - this is achievable because I will write all the code behind scenes, rejecting using the "controls" of visual API (Application Programming Interface) offered by Operating Systems, for example, the control "List Box" is so nastily written that few thousand lines choke it, it becomes virtually unusable. In contrast, in current revision 7 of Masakari, you can see billions of lines, no kidding, scrollable at 55 plus frames-per-second rate.

I did a quick showdown using the must-have English Wiktionary XML dump, downloadable at:
https://dumps.wikimedia.org/enwiktionary/

On a regular netbook or notebook with 8GB you can see the whole English Wiktionary XML dump (6GB in size) loaded into RAM (each line has its own descriptor 16 bytes long), nearly 4GB are used. For the entire English Wikipedia, the memory footprint is around 20GB - 1.2 billion lines x 16 bytes, it means that if you have 32GB (either physical RAM or 32GB swap file) you can browse off-line the incoming Wikipedias in next years, the XML dump from 2021-Jan-01 is 77GB strong, Wikipedia is steadily growing in size, roughly 5GB a year, so even if it becomes twice as big 150GB, Masakari will have no problems showing it.

Only for two weeks (that's how friendly and productive the QB64 environment and compiler are), I was able to write and share one stable revision (it is 7) which contains the source code and the executables, both for Linux and Windows, I have so many features to implement on my mind, however I won't go the path of burdening the interface with drop-down menus and what not, will keep it simple, if one kid is unable to use it, with ease and joy, it will mean - I failed. The point, Masakari is to be People's (or rather Kid's) textual browser/assistant for English texts.

The current package is downloadable at:
https://www.qb64.org/forum/index.php?topic=3518.msg129436#msg129436

For the first time I see the whole English Wikipedia loaded as if it is an ebook:



On my Internet drive I uploaded some Wiktionary screenshots:

Showing the wrapped 200+ million lines of Wiktionary:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gYgambc-MpKN5A_wk1xr5t_0DMPCkkHf/view?usp=sharing

Showing how the Wiktionary loading happens (it could be done in a Drag-and-Drop fashion as well) from the command prompt:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/17Gf5bjQRaSrHggf5_DCtiRPplP2XmSfM/view?usp=sharing

Showing the help (currently implemented keyboard/mouse combos/gestures) in the command prompt:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Ld1x2sKNJTpt50vNFLQbHIORUrxezVhM/view?usp=sharing

So, if you fellow members have some suggestions for adding specific features, I am open to implement them as long as they bring functionality. For instance, in next days will add this thread's MASAKARI_General-Purpose_Grade_English_Wordlist.wrd spell-check file to the package, in the following weeks gradually will add the biggest unigram (Schizandrafield) corpus as well, by the end of the year I want to offer the first bigram/trigram spell-checker...
Topic: Narcissist/Sociopath/Psychopath/Hubris - highlighting the differences
Posted: Monday, August 10, 2020 12:46:10 PM
> I think you’ll have to accept that in modern psychiatry the term “narcissist” is used to describe a number of conditions that stretch further than the classical idea...

Agreed, the word is loaded with additional aspects, in my view it would have been more wise if psychology invented new words/derivatives.

After looking it up, indeed, the loads/mappings began rather recently:

narcissism (n.)
1905, from German Narzissismus, coined 1899 (in "Die sexuellen Perversitäten"), by German psychiatrist Paul Näcke (1851-1913), on a comparison suggested 1898 by Havelock Ellis, from Greek Narkissos, name of a beautiful youth in mythology (Ovid, "Metamorphoses," iii.370) who fell in love with his own reflection in a spring and was turned to the flower narcissus (q.v.). Narcissus himself as a figure of self-love is attested by 1767. Coleridge used the word in a letter from 1822.
Source: https://www.etymonline.com/word/narcissism?ref=etymonline_crossreference

The dynamism among these 4 words is too much to handle, the confusion remains.

> To a narcissist other people just don't count. They aren't important. They are disposable.

Yes, this is the wide-spread notion, my objection is only about mapping a more proper word onto it, something like 'dismissive/disposable' as a root... thinking of the funny Sylvester Stallone's trilogy "The Expendables", I am sure Sylvester named it after the superscene from Rambo 2: YOU'RE NOT EXPENDABLE, also remembering gems as 'corrupter' in lockstep with 'corruptible' leads to ... hm, no result at the moment. On second thought, perhaps it is better to stick to the 'empath' (as in Star Trek) by introducing the antonym - APATH (devoid of suffering/feeling):

Etymology
From French apathie, from Latin apathīa, from Ancient Greek ἀπάθεια (apátheia, “impassibility”, “insensibility”, “freedom from emotion”), from ἀπαθής (apathḗs, “not suffering or having suffered”, “without experience of”), from ἀ- (a-, “not”) + πάθος (páthos, “anything that befalls one”, “incident”, “emotion”, “passion”).
Source: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/apathy

> and "hubris" is the odd one out because it doesn't refer to a person at all.

As you know, my inclination to new coinages often brings gems, in here, taking narciss+ist pattern, we have the beauty hubris+ist, a word nowhere to find.

> Also know that these terms are used incorrectly by the general population. "You seem like a narcissist" does not make you one. Please know that.

Yes, it is not wise at all to take a random talk/insult as a ... pure coin.

The thing that triggered me asking is that once I was called 'narcis' (in Bulgarian we often use it as a shortened form) by a woman with parapsychic abilities, it got me thinking, she stated it as if it was a fact, kinda no opinions allowed, however after looking into her eyes she changed and smiled, many years later on, I realized she wanted to warn me of my foolish overconfidence/ideas that I had the right understanding of things. To me, the world is a mirror everyone has the opportunity to look at and see oneself through eyes of others. If forced to describe myself using one of above 4 words, I would use 'hubrisist', I have the unpleasant strong tendency to accuse/faultfinding, as the accusator from Torah - the accusative angel Satanail/Satanael.

All in all, my current understanding is that psychopathy (pathological psy = ill soul) gathers such words into one herd, ruled/owned by Satanism.
It is worth mentioning that this woman was pro Bogomil teaching (Bogomilism being part of our Bulgarian heritage).

Satanael in Bogomilism

In Bogomilism, a Gnostic dualistic sect that flourished in Europe in the 10th through 15th centuries, Satanael is the older of two sons of God; the other is Christ. Satanael existed before Christ and was created good along with all the other Angels. He was held in the highest esteem and sat at the right hand of God as his steward. Soon, however, he grew dissatisfied with his station and rebelled.
...

Source: https://occult-world.com/satanael-satanail/

The topic is scary, yes, looking into yourself is a wise thing to do. That's why I love the myth about Narciss.
Topic: Narcissist/Sociopath/Psychopath/Hubris - highlighting the differences
Posted: Saturday, August 8, 2020 7:32:33 AM
While surfing, YouTube suggested a video of Dr. Carter with 40 years expertise in Narcissism, it got my attention, so I asked him how to distinct them.

What are the differences, the thing that troubles me is the huge amount of psychotherapy issues mapped onto e.g. Narcissist word.
In my view, this very word is badly polluted and overburden, no? AFAIK, it simply means a self-loving person, those 8 issues in the video appear as if taken from the psychopath definition, thus mishmashing the terms. Too often I see the usage of 'narcissist' as some general way to insult.

If you are called "Narcissist or Sociopath or Psychopath or Hubris", what is the first reaction of yours?
Mine was, "I don't understand."

Context: 8 Questions A Narcissist Simply Cannot Answer

Topic: Word for one saluting authentically, joyfully and serenely
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 3:56:42 PM
How to call a person/female saluting in a serene and beautiful manner?

Vocabularywise, I'm in search for words describing Hannah Davis' appearance in next clip:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWMVqCmC_NQ&list=LL4Jpqj0zx9z1ii2b0CSJX5Q&index=4&t=0s

Last night saw the 'Vacation' comedy and this scene made great impact on me, the song has this verse: "Que bonita ola para navegar", please Spanish fellows to help - is 'ola' a 'wave' or 'hello'?

"Bonita is a feminine given name as well as a word meaning "pretty, cute" in Spanish and Portuguese."

If there is no English word suitable for this cutie I turn to Spanish and Italian/Latin, my first thought was to use above 'bonita' and strengthen it by using superlatives as 'bonitisima' however after quick look-up in:
https://www.spanishdict.com/answers/157968/what-is-the-superlative-form-of-bonita

and using the suggestion there, my first finding became 'lindisima', but, another thing got me started, today I heard an old song - DNA - La Serenissima, so the Latin suffix '-issima' prompted for appliance, may come in handy.

Indeed, Spanish (pretty, cute) and Portuguese (beautiful; gorgeous) reinforce each other, especially when seeing what Old Spanish holds:
"In Old Spanish, the term originally meant "legitimate", later "authentic", "pure", "good", and finally eventually gave rise to the modern meaning."
Source: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/lindo#Spanish

Yet, not descriptive enough since the master theme in this clip is the "BEAUTIFUL/SERENE HELLO/SALUTATION", so how to transmute it into a monolithic word combining 'lindisima, serenissima' who salutes happily ...
Topic: MASAKARI: The people's choice 'General Purpose Grade' English wordlist
Posted: Monday, October 14, 2019 8:24:44 PM
My textual madness continues reaching new depths, just done the fastest hasher for English words/phrases/verses.

For fellow members that are unaware of what hashing is, it is the simplicity itself - the transformation (lossy compression) of a given chunk of data into a number. It is the fastest way (known to man) to search.

To sidekick English language users, three pillars have to be planted firmly in form of superfast functions for SEARCHING, HASHING and DECOMPRESSING and the following SUPERPILLAR, being very elusive, AUTO-COMPLETING (a.k.a. word-completion a.k.a. auto-predictor). Currently, no mindpower in my thinktank to play with automatic suggesters.

After years of searching for the best etude, finally, I have come up with the FASTEST one - FNV1A-Totenschiff, named after my second-best favorite book - 'The Death Ship' by B.Traven.

The greatest English rhymer ever has been hashed by the two rival "FASTEST" functions on Internet - the first being Wang Yi's WYHASH rightfully placed as #1 among 90+ superhashers all crafted by professionals from around the world:
https://github.com/rurban/smhasher

The second, written by machinely yours amateur Sanmayce, the brutal showdown I shared on IDZ forum - the Intel Developer Zone:
https://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/intel-moderncode-for-parallel-architectures/topic/824947#comment-1946707

The love for this book continues since 1991 when destiny threw it at me, literally.
Since then lots of Zen material passed my way, to honor it, I wrote an Haiku:

Night
Skylight
Key Sea
Deathship sailing


The humble disposition is paramount, therefore the dim light from the night sky refers to "shedding light" on hashing department.
In computer science, 'keys' are the data chunks for processing.




The overview in form of a PDF booklet:
https://software.intel.com/sites/default/files/managed/2c/10/NO-FIT_14-pages.pdf

Funny, how books, impressions and love for morphology collide (or rather converge) after many years UNEXPECTEDLY into a superfast practical etude.
Topic: mighty mad/sad/glad
Posted: Sunday, September 8, 2019 1:36:20 PM
Thanks whatson,
never encountered 'mighty mad' phrase, so I ran Google ngrams viewer for scary good,mighty mad,mighty glad, funny, it turns out my intensified "mighty glad" is in use widely, :P

Just heard another superb intensifier while listening to Dr. Courtney Brown - 'scary good', in contrast to 'mighty mad', 'scary mad' is unseen in Google Books corpus.

https://youtu.be/yXjwovIquGA?t=361

SCARY MAD, love it. As for SCARY GLAD, even rarer it is, but I saw a lot of scenes in which the grinning of the scary Leprechaun caused mixed feelings, as in this frame:

Topic: mighty mad/sad/glad
Posted: Sunday, September 8, 2019 10:30:57 AM
Wanted to share a strong coinage of mine stealing the awesome style of Ma Baker, among the best phrases I use are those "stolen" or/and rearranged from exciting lyrics and film dialogues.

Since today, when in communications I have to express great excitement I will use "mighty glad" - to pay respect to Boney M. - a mighty group indeed.

Ma Baker
Boney M.

Freeze I'm ma Baker
Put your hands in the air and give me all your money
This is the story of ma Baker the meanest cat from old Chicago town
She was the meanest cat
In old Chicago town
She was the meanest cat
She really mowed them down
She had no heart at all
No no no heart at all
She was the meanest cat
For she was really tough
She left her husband flat
He wasn't tough enough
She took her boys along
'Cause they were mean and strong
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She taught her four sons
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
To handle their guns
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She never could cry
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
But she knew how to die
They left a trail of crime
Across the USA
And when one boy was killed
She really made them pay
She had no heart at all
No no no heart at all
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She taught her four sons
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
To handle their guns
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She never could cry
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
But she knew how to die
She met a man she liked
She thought she'd stay with him
One day he informed on them
They did away with him
She didn't care at all
Just didn't care at all
Here is a special bulletin
Ma Baker is the FBI's most wanted woman
Her photo is hanging on every post office wall
If you have any information about this woman
Please contact the nearest police station
Don't anybody move the money or your lives
One day they robbed a bank
It was last foray
The cops appeared to soon
They couldn't get away
With all the loot they had
It made them mighty mad
And so they shot it out
Ma Baker and her sons
They didn't want to hang
They died with blazing guns
And so the story ends
Of one who left no friends
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She taught her four sons
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
To handle their guns
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She never could cry
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
But she knew how to die
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She taught her four sons
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
To handle their guns
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
She never could cry
Ma ma ma ma
Ma Baker
But she knew how to die


Source: LyricFind
Songwriters: Frank Farian / Fred Jay / George Reyam
Ma Baker lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

https://youtu.be/9c5yPIQ3LQI?list=PLrXiF8SQfJJ6-V56FyYXoFaF9peFu1kiM&t=205
Topic: "What can not love must hate"
Posted: Sunday, July 28, 2019 7:13:19 AM
Yesterday, on my way home, I was listening (in a loop) to the album version of Diamant on my Samsung portable player, felt centered and "on the path" as I used to be. Too much garbage I carry on my back, I worry about, it is good to feel oneself alive.