The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: A cooperator
About
User Name: A cooperator
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: A teaching assistant at a University
Interests: English
Gender: Male
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Thursday, October 27, 2011
Last Visit: Monday, November 12, 2018 8:37:58 AM
Number of Posts: 2,872
[0.32% of all post / 1.12 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: When to use capital letters for the first letter of a word?[Punctuation]
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2018 8:18:05 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Do whichever one helps you the most, and provides you with the data you need.


If persons, you, for instance, are going to preserve their names, along with their cellphone numbers, etc. in your address book, are members of a company, then according to Job Hierarchy, you can type their job titles in capitalised letters in the "job title" field of contact entity to be saved. For instance,

Prefix and Name: Dr John
Job Title: Executive Director
Company: Stallion Security & Safety Services Ltd

However, if you have a person not having a job in a company, but has a private job(non job hierarchy), then what would you type in the job title field in the contact entry of that person to be saved into your address book?

Prefix and Name: Mr Gray
Job Title: cobbler
Company: possibly typing the name of cobbler's shop.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: When to use capital letters for the first letter of a word?[Punctuation]
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2018 7:19:00 AM
Thank you so much,
However, other way to represent job titles in companies:
Dr Robert
General Executive Director
Stallion Company

Dr Smith
Head Manager
Stallion Company

Ms Julia
secretary
Stallion Company

Mr John
Chief Marketing Manager
Stallion Company


Mrs Lila
Lead Accountant
Stallion Company


Mr Richard
Senior Accountant
Stallion Company


Miss Soha
accountant
Stallion Company

Dr Adam
telcomms engineer
Stallion Company

Mr Gray
cleaner
Stallion Company
===============
If I am only going to save persons' names, along with their phone numbers, in contacts into my book address, a person does work as a cobbler as private job, then do I need to type a "cobbler" in the "job title" field of contact form to be filled in or leave it empty.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: When to use capital letters for the first letter of a word?[Punctuation]
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2018 5:56:43 AM
Would anyone please be so kind as to take out some of their precious time to address these points of mine?

First of all, if capitalization is a matter of preference, then how can I determine if it is a job/post title or it is a description.
I am a Professor of the Head of Computer Science. <=> I am a professor.
I am the Office Manager of General Executive Director
I am a cobbler.
I am an accountant.
I am a security guard.
=============
Other way to represent job titles in conmpnies:
Dr Robert
General Executive Director
Stallion Company

Dr Smith
Head Manager
Stallion Company

Ms Julia
secretary
Stallion Company

Mr John
Chief Marketing Manager
Stallion Company


Mrs Lila
Lead Accountant
Stallion Company


Mr Richard
Senior Accountant
Stallion Company


Miss Soha
accountant
Stallion Company

Dr Adam
telcomms engineer
Stallion Company

Mr Gray
cleaner
Stallion Company
===============
If I am only going to save persons' names, along with their phone numbers, in
contacts into my book address, a person does work as a cobbler as private job, then do I need to type a cobbler in the "job title" field of contact form to be filled in or leave it empty.

=================
Firstly: "a Master Builder", "a Master Carpenter", and "a Master Goldsmith", I am thinking of 'Master' is corresponding to / similar to "Head", "Chief", "senior" in "a Head Chef", "a Chief Engineer", "a Senior Engineer" in order. In other words, "Master", "Head", "Chief", and "Senior" all reveal a job level as in No#3 below.
If yes, then what difference is there between 'a Master Carpenter' and 'a Head Carpenter', 'a Chief Carpenter', and 'a Senior Carpenter'?

Secondly: Please correct me here if I was wrong in the concept of capitalization in 1, 2, and 3.

1- Job titles describing the responsibilities of the position: Executive, Manager, Director, Chief, Supervisor, Professor, etc.

2- Job titles reflecting what the person does on the job: a builder, a carpenter, a goldsmith, a chef, an engineer, an accountant, a housekeeper, a social media specialist, a programmer, a telcomms engineer, a mechanic, a guest services coordinator, a soldier, a police officer, a prison officer, a prison warder(Brit)/a prison guard (Amr), an auditor, an editor etc. It can be said not be capitalized.

3- Job titles revealing both the job level(a modifier as a noun, in bold) and the job responsibilities: a Master Builder, a Master Carpenter, a Master Goldsmith, a Master Prison Officer, a Head Chef, a Head Carpenter, a Chief Engineer, a Chief Carpenter, a Senior Engineer, a Senior Carpenter, a Lead Accountant, an Electrical Superintendent, a Marketing Manager, Assistant Professor, a Teaching Assistant, etc.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: To confront a bunch of countries, among which (are) the US and the UK, and also the UN (are).
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2018 5:44:27 AM
No one replied to me means I am correct here below.
You've said that the verb, auxiliary, 'are' should go after the relative pronoun "among which" since the subject of relative clause is far long to be followed by the auxiliary verb . Isn't 'the US and the UK, and also the UN (?) (which means the whole world?).' the subject of the relative clause?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: Zoology and Marine & Freshwater Biology Degrees=Zoology Degree. Marine & Freshwater Biology Degree
Posted: Sunday, November 11, 2018 7:42:37 PM
Hi Everyone!
I have read
ANIMAL BIOLOGY
Glasgow has had a long and outstanding record on Animal Biology. Our Zoology and Marine & Freshwater Biology Degrees are the most vibrant and highly demanded curricula in the whole of the UK.


First of all, I don't know what grammar term name can be called for such a topic. I am always stumped with combining or separating such patterns. So, 'Degree' or 'Biology Degree' will go with each of 'Zoology' and 'Marine & Freshwater' if I am going to separate them.
Zoology Biology Degree.
Marine & Freshwater Biology Degrees.



Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: 'Personal titles' and 'job titles'
Posted: Sunday, November 11, 2018 6:47:43 PM
Hello Everyone!

What does the job title 'Vice-Principal' here mean? "Vice-Principal" means "Vice-Rector" or "Vice-Chancellor" of a university. I.e. I can replace "Vice-Principal" below with "Vice-Rector" or "Vice-Chancellor"

Professor Muffy Calder, Vice-Principal and Head of College of Science and Engineering
Professor Dame Anna Dominiczak, Regius Professor of Medicine, Vice-Principal and Head of College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: 'The dying girl' Vs. 'The dead girl' (participles)
Posted: Sunday, November 11, 2018 10:13:16 AM
thar wrote:
I think you will make this too complicated if you try to match them too closely.
Dying is a participle - it represents an action. The girl was dying. That was what she was doing.

The dying girl
The running girl
The laughing girl.

At that moment, she was dying, or running, or laughing.
If you are dying, you may end up dead, or you may be saved and end up fine. It doesn't say what happens next. Dying is not a very dynamic action, but grammatically it is still an action, just as much as laughing.


Thanks a lot, Thar
1- does any present participle modifying a noun a participle represent an action.
a walking boy => a boy who is/was/has walking.
a Lying man => a man who is/was/has been lying.
Etc.

2- if a participle comes after a noun, then what it represents:

Caring my sick mother is a time consuming.
The man asking me is rogue.
The boy walking is my friend.
Any man lying can do anything.

thar wrote:
'dead' is an adjective. It describes the state of the girl. She is dead. She is not alive. She may have just died, or she may have died a long time ago. It is not something that she is doing, or something that is happening to her. It just describes her at that time. And if she is a dead girl, then unless this is a horror story she is going to stay that way.
The dead girl
The tall girl
The French girl


Thar,
1- if an ordinary adjective(non-derived adjectives from P.P), such as tall, French, bad, etc. is followed by or following a noun, then no doubt it describes a state of sth. However, "dead" is past participle which can be passivised form (something that is happening to someone).
The dead man was buried.

2- if a participle comes after a noun, then what it represents:

The man dead was buried.=> The man who was dead was buried.


As I am asking in general, not only with "dead".

I've been struggling to master these patterns to be able to write my own sentences well.
So, would you be so kind as to tell me the key of mastering such structures?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: 'The dying girl' Vs. 'The dead girl' (participles)
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 1:37:47 PM
Hi Everyone!
I am right about thinking of these forms as the following:
"Me and the Earl and the dying girl." means "Me and the Earl and the girl who is/was/has been dying."
"Me and the Earl and the dead girl." means"Me and the Earl and the girl who is/was/has been dead."




Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: admit" to allow (someone) to enter a place. (Verbs)
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 10:44:59 AM
Romany wrote:

Yes that's right.

However, "liberal justice" is a concept; a political stance. It doesn't make sense to admit a political ideology to a hospital!

One could say:


"The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was hospitalised....." - because it is the person who holds these views who has been hospitalised - not the actual ideology.


Thanks to you.

I have only two more questions pertinent to this topic on this thread, the first one is if an applicant applied for a place at a university, was given an admissions offer, then we could have said "You have been admitted for a place."

The other one is when "admit" is paired with "to" or "for". I have looked up "admit for" in my Longman dictionary, but I didn't find any.

As NKM said "Admitted to a/the hospital" is a rather specific idiom; it simply means "hospitalized".

Thus, with the meaning "enable to enter":
1- "admitted to a hospital" means "hospitalised"
The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.=>The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was hospitalised Thursday.
2- "admitted for observation and treatment"/ "admitted for a place at a university" means what.
"She went home, but after experiencing discomfort overnight, went to George Washington University Hospital early this morning," the court said in a statement Thursday. "Tests showed that she fractured three ribs on her left side and she was admitted for observation and treatment."

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Topic: an unnecessary comma before the dependent clause marker 'because, since' (Punctuation)
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 8:34:52 PM
Hi Everyone!

I was corrected it appears that I have an unnecessary comma before the dependent clause marker "because, since, if".

I decided to PM you, since I don't want to be drawn into an argument on the forum with anyone.
I decided to PM you, because I don't want to be drawn into an argument on the forum with anyone.
I could lend you, If I were rich.

But, when 'as' is written, there is no punctuation error with the comma or without it.
I decided to PM you, as I don't want to be drawn into an argument on the forum with anyone.
I decided to PM you as I don't want to be drawn into an argument on the forum with anyone.

There is no punctuation error with the comma or without it.
If I were rich, I could lend you.
If I were rich I could lend you.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.