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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, April 25, 2019 12:11:52 PM
Number of Posts: 10,648
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: country bumpkin
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 12:11:34 PM
RuthP wrote:
As opposed, of course, to a city slicker.


And at one time, mountain people referred to them as "flatlanders"...Whistle


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Pre-determiners
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 12:08:54 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Thanks FounDit.
So it seems that your (American) style is very much the same as my (British) style.

I guess that the omission of "of" in some situations is informal - but it sounds "OK" for 'half' but somehow, not quite OK for 'quarter' - and definitely not for "a tenth" or "a sixth".
EDITED to add: However, the hyphenated "fractional units" - a half-cup or a quarter-tank - are quite normal.

**************
Does the second one sound OK to you?
For this recipe, we need a quarter of the sugar as last time.
It sounds definitely weird to me . . .Think


This one sounds fine to me. It is a bit strange, however, that some fractions sound okay with the omission of the word "of", while others don't. But I find it often depends on how the sentence is worded, with no particular rule about when to use it, and when not to. I suppose it depends on the speaker.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: using "she" when referring to an inanimate thing
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:58:01 AM
As an American, I wouldn't think of the house I grew up in as either he or she. I would say "it". I hope it is still there (it is). I "might" think of a car as "she", but that would be rare. It, too, would still be an "it". But that might just be me.

And I don't think of my country it terms of male or female, and while I don't think of it this way, I have heard others speak of our flag as "she", as in, "long may she wave", and it doesn't sound strange, but I would tend to say "long may it wave".

Perhaps a few others will voice an opinion and we'll see how common it is to think like that, because I have, on occasion, been told I don't think like everyone else. I can't imagine why anyone would say that ... Shhh


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Sit in the middle.
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:34:56 AM
Yes, I would say, "Sit in the middle of the chair, not on the edge".


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: You spat on me.
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:22:49 AM
ozok wrote:
Quote:

A phrase I've heard people use is "Say it - don't spray it!"


I’ve also heard people use this smart phrase.

But be careful saying this…it could be interpreted as being aggressive or offensive and you could end up with a black eye. Or worse.


Yes. If you use this phrase, only use it with someone who is a friend, in a joking way, or with someone who will not be offended.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: I go swimming now.
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:20:12 AM
tracker890 wrote:
Dear Everyone:
First, the word "likes" is the wrong usage. For the personal pronoun "I/you" we use "like", (singular) but "they" (plural) uses "like". "Likes" is used for individual others, he/she/it "likes".

S+~go + (to-) v :
I like to go to swim.
This says you like the activity. You like to swim.

S+~go + n./adj.:
I like to go swimming.
This one is good.

S+~go + v-ing:
I go swimming now.
Using "I go" says you like the activity, so the only way to use "I go" is to put swimming in that category. "I like to go swimming in the summer", or "I like to go swimming whenever I have opportunity". It's something you like to do.

For the action of swimming, you would say, "I am going swimming now". This is an active idea. You are going to do it now.

I hope I haven't confused you.

In order to understand the usage of the word "go", so I wrote three sentences.
And I'm not sure if it's right or not, so if have wrong in the sentences, please help me to correct it.

Thank you for your time and consideration.




We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: late for (the) first period
Posted: Thursday, April 25, 2019 10:00:52 AM
lazarius wrote:
https://books.google.com/books?id=paaMAAAAQBAJ&pg=PA51&dq=%22late+for+first+period%22

Quote:
As a result, my As plummeted to Bs and Cs most of my Senior year, I overslept, was always late for first period, forged my mother's name on my excused notes to my teacher, half did my work and did not really care.

Why is there no article?

Is it the same with 'lesson' - late for first lesson?

-


Here in the U.S., students most often refer to their classes for the day by the order they have them e.g., first period (which might be History) through sixth period (which might be English) for example. An article isn't used in this case.

As for "lesson", we might normally say, "late for my first lesson", but normally not for any others that come after the first. We would probably just say, "I was late for my first two/three etc. lessons", or "late for my English lesson". I should add, however, we don't use "lesson" much at all. More often we would say "late for (my) class" without any article.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Pre-determiners
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 9:31:38 PM
Mr.Shark wrote:
Hello. Can you explain when we need to use 'of' after the fractions, please?

Here are some examples from https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Determiners.htm

“I used to earn half (of) my current salary.” Yes. I would almost always use "of" in this sentence. I say "almost" because I could easily imagine saying, "I used to earn about half my current salary" in a very informal setting.

“For this recipe, we need a quarter (of) the sugar as last time.” For this one I would always use "of".

“One-tenth of the respondents answered ‘yes’ to my question.” (Of is necessary in this construction.) And the same here.

The only time I might omit the "of" would be if I were speaking of using something like "a quarter-cup" as the answer to a question.

"How much oil am I supposed to use for this?"
"A quarter-cup".

"How much gas do we have left in the tank?"
"About a half-a-tank"/ maybe a quarter-tank".


We do we need the preposition 'of' in the last example?

Thank you in advance


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: I count religion but a childish toy, and hold there is no sin but ignorance.
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 10:44:05 AM
Alice M Toaster wrote:
Mintaka: Not only is the Bible not a book of truth, the version that most people know was written by relatively educated people at a time when most people were illiterate.

I agree with Marlowe: the only sin is ignorance.


I disagree with both you and Marlowe. Ignorance, or being unaware of something, is not a sin. It cannot be. Sin is selfishness. In every case of "sin", the self is elevated over others, or by putting the self over some rule or given law. Only this can be rightly called "sin".


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: saltish
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 10:36:26 AM
I've never heard it used in the U.S.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit

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