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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:31:02 PM
Number of Posts: 8,917
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: On Political Correctness
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:30:28 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I've been away . . .

I'm glad you both liked the clip - as I said, it's not an example of political correctness.

Actually, what it is is an example of the type of person who (in my experience) mostly indulges in making everyone else wrong for the way they speak and the words they use.
As I said before - it is not the progressive, or the left-wing (two completely separate categories), it is the ultra-conservative, right-wing, wannabe-aristocrat snobs who act that way. "Better-than-thou, elitist" are very good descriptions.
Agreed.

And that way of acting is very different from someone in the setting of a grammar-forum mentioning that one will lose marks in an exam by using gendered pronouns.
It is the fact that marks on an exam will be lowered for use of gendered pronouns that would constitute political correctness. That was my point. Mentioning that fact is not itself political correctness, but supporting and/or advocating for it would be; not because someone wants a change, but because people are punished for not accepting it (lowered marks), or for questioning the need for it (labeling with pejorative terms anyone who dares do so).

It is the attempted total character-assassination and embarrassment of everyone around - the words one used just happen to be the current topic which can be used.
One day it's "Ooh, you said 'he' instead of 'they'."
Another day it might be "I see you bought non-organic eggs.(sneer)"
Another day it could be "Did you just throw that in the rubbish, instead of the recycle-bin?"
Not said to you . . . but said broadly to anyone who is within hearing-distance.

I pity the kids really.



A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: 'Many a '
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 3:01:25 PM
Ashutosh S wrote:
'Many a' is always followed by a singular verb - e.g Many a student in the school is good at English.
I think you mean "singular noun".

Why then is the below marked incorrect ? (in one of the books with me) In short, my question is, isn't the below statement correct ?
The polling was marred at many a place by violence.
I don't know why this is labeled as incorrect. It seems perfectly fine to me, although this usage is declining in modern times. I still hear it, however, from the older generation (mine and above).

The ngram viewer says it was very popular usage around 1900, but has been declining ever since.



A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Grammar
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 2:41:54 PM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, do you see anything grammatically wrong in these sentence?

Just to get more understanding on this, Lawak Ke Der is a stand-up comedy show.

Short summary
Hilarity ensues! An ensemble of comedians are ready to entertain you today. From Istana Budaya, Harith Iskandar, Nabil, Jozan and Boboi are set to keep you laughing harder and louder!

Long summary
For the first time Lawak Ke Der takes the stage at Istana Budaya. This popular comedy show features Malaysia’s godfather of comedy, Harith Iskander, and his group of hilarious comics, Dato' Afdlin Shauki, Boboi, and Jozan. It is directed by the famous producer, director and actor, Hans Isaac and Raja Lawak fame, Nabil as host and performer.
The last part of this I can't help you with. You mention the director, but then list two names (Hans Isaac and Raja Lawak. Or, is it Hans Isaac and Raja, of Lawak fame? I can't tell) and Nabil as host and performer.



A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: conditioNAL
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 2:22:07 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Are all the following sentences correct?

1) He will help you, if you lend him $10.


4) He would help, you if you lend him $10.
5) He can help you, if you lend him $10$.
6) He could help you, if you lend him $10.
7) He may help you, if you lend him $10.
8) He might help you, if you lend him $10.



All these sound natural to me, but all need the comma.

A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Is the list correctly punctuated?
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 2:18:51 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
I would like to explain about the following Buddhist terms:

1. The Lotus Sutra;
2. The Essential teaching; and
3. Tiantai.

a) Is 'about' needed? No. You could simply say I would like to explain the following Buddhist terms:
b) Is 'and' optional? I'm not sure is there is a rule about that, but I have seen it done. However, a comma would follow "teaching" if it is used. In the end, it might be better to omit it.
c) Is the list correctly punctuated? I've never seen a list punctuated with semi-colons, as you have it here. It looks wrong to me. Generally, I think there are no punctuation marks in a numbered list.

Thanks.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Email?
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 2:12:48 PM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, just want to ensure that is the below email composition is grammatically correct?
Like DragOnspeaker, I'm not familiar with the jargon, but just looking at what the sentences appear to say, I find a few things I think might be changed.

I just wanted to briefly recap the things we spoke about using episodic title (True/False).

True: If there is an episodic title on TPS, we will key in on AMC into the title tab. Here, I would say, "key AMC on the title tab".
Even if it says “True” on TPS, but if the business unit cannot confirm the episodic title for such a TV series/reality shows from KixHD/FYI/Lifetime and etc, we will key in the episodic title in the long synopsis, and not on the AMC ‘Title” tab.

False: Even if it says “False” on TPS, but if there is a complete episodic title provided by supplier/SharePoint, we will key in the episodic title on the AMC “title” tab. Eg: HBO/Warner TV/ Fox and etc.
The corrections made here are based on the idea of the sentence saying, "Even if it says "True/False" on TPS, but the business unit cannot confirm/there is a complete episodic title..."

Animax (Library and concurrent): The episodic title remains in Long synopsis.

Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

Thank you.

TPS and AMC is the system name.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: I took it
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:40:57 AM
Tara2 wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Which meaning of "took" is used in the sentence below?
I like to bet on anything that is exciting, so when my friends tried to tempt me with an offer, I took it.


Here, "took" means "accepted." The writer accepted the offer that was given.


Thank you so much

Can you please explain in the text below which usage of "would" is used?
"The idea was for me to spend a frigid December night in a cemetery, all alone, in order to win twenty dollars. Little did I realize that they would use dirty tricks to try to frighten me to abandon the cemetery and, therefore, lose my wager."


The writer is speaking about a series of events in the past. "Last year I didn't realize that if I did A, B would follow."

Compare that to the present: "Now that I'm older I understand that if I do A, B will result."

But only twenty bucks to stay in a cemetery all night??!!

Yes it's only 20 dollars. Maybe it's an old story :D
Thank you so much
Is "would" future in the past?

Yes. It expresses the possibility of something happening at a time in the past. While you were in the cemetery, you did not know your friends would (might/possibly) try to trick you.



A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: The way it is
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:31:53 AM
kullboys wrote:
Hello everyone
Is it possible to say: Somebody wants to go on the way it is? I would like to say that there are those who are reluctant to change their way of living.

Thanks.


Your question indicates only one person, but your second sentence indicates a group of people.

There are several ways to say each one. For an individual, you might say,
He/She wants things to go on as they have in the past/as they always have/as before.

For a group, you could say:
They/Some people/People want things to go on as the always have/always have in the past.
They/Some people/People want things to continue as they are today.





A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: driving down the street
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:25:08 AM
pjharvey wrote:
No, they are not correct, because there is no subject agreement.
You must use something like "They injured him while he was sitting behind the wheel of his car" (by the way, what was he doing sitting behind the wheel of his car???, and which wheel was it?).
This is valid for all 3 sentences.


A very funny mental picture...LOL.


You might even wonder how they managed to shoot her in the shoulder while driving down the street. That's takes some pretty good shooting, the marksmanship increasing proportionally to the rate of speed...Whistle

It's also interesting to think how you could talk to her driving, whether the driving took place on her street or another street; and did her driving answer?...Whistle




A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Topic: Is "consists of" correctly used?
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 10:17:37 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Sans, who lives with her husband and daughter, told Stomp that the neighbouring unit consists of a couple and their five children. At times, Sans would see the couple's parents and their other family members too.

Is "consists of" correctly used?

Thanks.


If by "neighboring unit", another apartment or condo is meant, then no, this would not be correct. A better description would be to say, "...the neighboring unit houses a couple and their five children."

Even better, IMO, would be to say, "a couple and their five children live in the neighboring unit".


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~

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