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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Interests: Psychology, philosophy, thought-provoking discussions
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 3:17:12 PM
Number of Posts: 11,827
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Sensing something amiss...
Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 3:13:50 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Sensing something amiss, I checked the camera playback.

I think my original question above
has not been answered.


Shouldn't it be "Sensing something was amiss..." instead?


Both are acceptable and correct. As ARMECH said "something amiss (adverb form) is an acceptable construction, and so is something was amiss (Amiss in the adjective form, hence needing was)."

It's just two ways of saying something with a slight difference in the sense of it. Like saying, "Sensing something was missing" vs. "I sensed something was missing".

In the first one, you are definite/certain in saying what you think. In the second, you suspect something is missing, but may not be certain.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: me or myself
Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 3:05:31 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
He also explained that when asked by a member of the public earlier this year about the staffing of The Online Citizen (TOC), he ”did not shy away from confessing that TOC does hire foreign staff due to lack of resources”.

“Therefore, Ms Chng’s comments about TOC and myself have caused unfair damage to TOC’s reputation,” he asserted.

Shouldn't it be"me" instead of "myself"?

Thanks.


Modern use is "me", but older English used to employ "myself" like this. It isn't considered wrong, I think, but is not considered as "proper" as it once was.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: MMA fighters Adam...
Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 3:01:32 PM
Amybal wrote:
Thank you for the correction. I have a question, may I know what does mean for “ face off in the ring”?

Adam and Johan face off in the ring


Hi Amy,

"face off" is an idiom that means two people, or two teams are about to engage in a competition, or a contest of some kind. Often said of fighters or sports teams. It is sometimes used with a hyphen when the competitors have a face-off.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Attractive and suave...
Posted: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 10:40:21 AM
Also note this word needs to be changed:

Long summary
Attractive and suave Faiz is a conman with years of experience in investment scams, real estate scams and other illegal dealings. However, his extravagant lifestyle as a Dato is soon in jeopardy when the police begin to suspect him as the lynchpin of suspicious activities.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Being detained
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 12:27:24 PM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
He chased two police community support officers (PCSOs) before being detained, the force said.
I saw the above at https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-50014205
I know that the preposition are followed by a noun or noun phrases so
"Being detained" must be a noun. I still don't get it the role of "being" here.


It is an on-going condition. "He is detained" means the same thing as "he is being detained". He finds himself in that condition or circumstance.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Being used
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 12:22:36 PM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
You might hear about immunoglobulin being used in some people with other immune (autoimmune) problems.
Immunoglobulin therapy
I am really sorry to ask again about "being" but is "being used" a present progressive passive in "being used in some people.."?


Yes, the sense is of an on-going condition, or action.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: sorry + infinitive/perfect infinitive/gerund
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 12:20:38 PM
Tara2 wrote:
The following quote is from Practical English Usage by Swan".
"Sorry for/about + -ing is used to refer to past things that one regrets. Sorry + perfect infinitive can be used with the same meaning. Sorry + infinitive is used to apologise for current situations - things that one is doing or going to do, or that one has just done."


According to the above quote can I use "to wake up" with the same meaning? And also "for waking you up"?
I'm sorry to have woken you up.


Yes, this is fine. Some people would also say, "Sorry to wake you up", at the moment the person wakes up. The sense of that is that you are sorry for the need to wake them.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: more likely to hear
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 12:16:58 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
In America you would be more likely to hear "The faculty is meeting today" than "The faculty are meeting today."

Can "more likely hear" replace "likely to hear"?

Many thanks.



Not without changing more words.

You can say, 'In America you would be more likely to hear "The faculty is meeting today" than "The faculty are meeting today."'

But to use "likely to hear", you would have to change it a bit.

In America you are likely to hear "The faculty is meeting today" more than "The faculty are meeting today."




We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: a/the seemingly infinite number of
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 11:43:16 AM
Reiko07 wrote:
The Japanese language is in stark contrast to the English language in many ways. It wouldn't be too much to say that English is a million miles away from Japanese. Nevertheless, little effort has been made to help Japanese learners of English surmount a/the seemingly infinite number of obstacles arising from the differences between English and Japanese.
[my sentences]

Which is correct, a or the?


I think either can be used. "A" seemingly infinite number and "the" seemingly infinite number both mean the same thing - a number that is unknown, and the number that is unknown. So it doesn't matter which word is used, in this case, it's the same number.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Topic: Immunoglobulin
Posted: Sunday, October 13, 2019 11:39:35 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
Biochemistry
Any of a class of proteins present in the serum and cells of the immune system, which function as antibodies.
‘she was given intravenous immunoglobulin’
count noun ‘they are susceptible to infection in spite of high concentrations of immunoglobulins’

https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/immunoglobulin
I find it difficult to differentiate the use of the noun "immunoglobulin" as mass and countable noun.


I tend to think of it as being like blood. Blood is a mass noun, but there are four different types.

Immunoglobulin is a mass noun, but there are five different types.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit

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