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Profile: FounDit
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User Name: FounDit
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 19, 2011
Last Visit: Saturday, July 11, 2020 11:50:21 AM
Number of Posts: 13,927
[1.39% of all post / 4.33 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: When politicians try to do the right thing.
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 11:47:49 AM
towan52 wrote:
A little digression is good for the soul and does tend to lighten the moment (at home we call it an "LTM"). Very useful to take the heat out of a discussion. I've been guilty of going off topic for years - but I'm not sorry Angel . I hear you about memory issues, I frequently think of vitriolic abuse to hurl at FD, but by the time I get online, I've forgotten what it was and remembered what a nice chap he really is!


I really am just a lovable little fuzz-ball (well, I've lost most of my fuzz, but some remains).

Signed:
FD: Fidei Defensor - defender of the faith

A defender of my country and its greatness; defender of its current leader, President Trump; defender of it Rights and Constitution; defender of truth, logic and reason; defender of our country's commitment to always strive for improvement by learning from its mistakes.


Topic: cut/cut up
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 11:36:56 AM
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain 'cut up'? Is that different from 'cut'?

Each time you wear them for a week and then wash them, they become a little bit more worn. Eventually, after they have been around this loop many times, they will become so worn that they are unattractive or there is a risk that they will fall apart. If they fall apart while you're wearing them, everyone will find this very funny, but you won't. So before this happens, you will decide that they are "worn out" and you will cut them up into rags for dirty jobs like cleaning your bicycle.


You can "cut up" a shirt or a towel to use as a rag, or you can say, "Cut that shirt up into pieces to use for rags". The meaning is the same.

There is an idiom, "cut up" as in, "He is such a cut up". In that case, "cut up" means someone who is always joking or trying to make others laugh. There are other uses for "cut up", such as:

cut someone or something up
Fig. to criticize someone or something severely. Jane is such a gossip. She was really cutting Mrs. Jones up. The professor really cut up my essay.
See also: cut, up
cut someone up
Fig. to make someone laugh. That comedian's routine really cut me up. Tommy's rude noises cut the whole class up, but not the teacher.
See also: cut, up
cut up (about someone or something)
Sl. emotionally upset about someone or something. She was all cut up about her divorce. You could see how cut up she was.
Topic: rags
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 11:30:23 AM
Tara2 wrote:
Is 'rags' like the things that we want to threw away or like old and worn clothing?

Each time you wear them for a week and then wash them, they become a little bit more worn. Eventually, after they have been around this loop many times, they will become so worn that they are unattractive or there is a risk that they will fall apart. If they fall apart while you're wearing them, everyone will find this very funny, but you won't. So before this happens, you will decide that they are "worn out" and you will cut them up into rags for dirty jobs like cleaning your bicycle.


Yes, this is a good description. They don't have to be cut into rags. Sometimes a whole towel or tee shirt can be used for a larger job.
Topic: worn out/worn
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 11:28:04 AM
Tara2 wrote:
Hello Sarries!
Sorry, I understand 'worn' and 'worn out'. But when we want to use 'worn' before noun like 'worn clothes' here we mean the clothes that are worn out NOT the clothes that are worn, right? Here we can't say 'worn out clothes', right?


Hi Tara,

Usually, when we speak of "worn clothes", we mean clothes that you can tell are not new, but show signs of having been worn for some time. If they are "worn out", they generally look so bad you would think they need to be replaced.
Topic: A group of superbike...
Posted: Saturday, July 11, 2020 11:22:20 AM
Amybal wrote:
Hi, is there anything wrong in these sentences?
You can omit the word, "the" in both summaries.
Short summary
A group of superbike riders calling themselves Pirate Bikers share a deep common interest and commitment in their superbikes. Sick of illegal races, they want to challenge on the real race tracks.

Long summary
The Pirate Bikers, lead by Bugis, share a deep, common interest in their Superbikes. After years of illegal racing on the streets, they are now eager to compete on real race tracks. After a fateful meeting with Pak Hamid, who is a veteran racer, and receiving tutelage from him, the Pirate Bikers feel ready to take on that challenge.
Topic: When politicians try to do the right thing.
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 6:34:07 PM
Romany wrote:


There have been instances where FD's abuse has had consequences; and this fact has been mentioned, yet he's not expressed concern, or even interest in the fact that his language and manner are so toxic they have led on to blight a couple of people's entire lives! Neither of whom had, like most of us, any idea about, nor interest in Democrats & Republicans and American politics.
Umm,...not sure you can get away with that lie since you have repeatedly criticized the President and all who supported and voted for him over the last four years. But as to blighting people's lives, I think a person would have to be extremely weak-minded to allow a post on a forum to devastate them to such a degree (but perhaps you are speaking of yourself. I can believe that if so).

Which is one of the reasons that the fact that he now interferes on both "Learners" sites - Grammar & Vocabulary - dragging his opinions to present as facts. To-day he proudly planted his (Confederate) Flag of Political Intent:
"Interfere"? So now, offering an opinion in the Grammar and Vocabulary topics is "interfering"?



"Hmm..., since many here often refer to me as FD, that could be me:

FD: Fidei Defensor - defender of the faith

A defender of my country and its greatness; defender of its current leader, President Trump; defender of it Rights and Constitution; defender of truth, logic and reason; defender of our country's commitment to always strive for improvement by learning from its mistakes.
Yeah, I like it...Dancing"

Confederate? Was that supposed to insult me? ROTFLMAO. This is the flag I respect and admire:

so
This was in a Vocabulary post. As we all know by now, FD doesn't understand satire, sarcasm, irony. Nevertheless, his only response will be to reach into his meagre grab-bag and pick out, dusted down, and set in their well-worn grooves again, the usual excuses: "Can't you take a joke" "You people are so hate-filled you now want to ban joking around"...etc.
And you just proved the truth of that statement. Thank you.

Quo vadis TFD? Does YOUR silence give consent to your English resource to toe a political line?
Ah, yes. Having no success with insults and aspersions, she seeks someone in authority to save her. It's almost comical. No, it's really rather pitiable.
Topic: What does "Fides" mean here?
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 11:37:01 AM
Hmm..., since many here often refer to me as FD, that could be me:

FD: Fidei Defensor - defender of the faith

A defender of my country and its greatness; defender of its current leader, President Trump; defender of it Rights and Constitution; defender of truth, logic and reason; defender of our country's commitment to always strive for improvement by learning from its mistakes.
Yeah, I like it...Dancing
Topic: Present Perfect and Past perfect
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 11:26:42 AM
A cooperator wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

"Since" is similar - it can be used with several combinations of tenses - whatever makes sense.


Dragonspeaker,
But, the writer of the Guide for Mixed Tense Exercises only mentioned that when the time-marker is "since", the time clause is past simple and the main clause is present perfect.

So, when non-native learner of English reads such a guide, s/he will only expect that 'since' can be used in such tense mixing.

But, I also today came across this example:
There have been more than 6 months of updates since the version you are using. There's a lot of cleaning updates you're missing out on.


The sense here is that "There have been more...updates since the version you are using.

The "more than 6 months" refers to the updates, not "There have been". To be clear, it would have been better to write, "In over 6 months, there have been more updates since the version you are using."
Topic: scaffy witch gave me a gammy spell (BE)
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 11:17:00 AM
Just to add a bit to your knowledge, in AmE, we often use the word "game" (as in "soccer game") for "gammy".

game2 (geɪm)

adj.
lame: a game leg.
[1780–90; perhaps shortening of gammy, though change in vowel unclear]
Topic: On Sundays, a few of the party's old grandees
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 11:11:50 AM
Boris66 wrote:
Do my sentences sound natural?

On Sundays, a few of the party's old grandees would convene at an unassuming pub in the countryside, where, heartened by a large amounts of food and drinks, they plotted to oust the Prime Minister. What they didn't know was that one of them was an informer. Tom, now in his seventies, embittered because he was never given the post of foreign secretary that he had coveted for decades, now saw his chance to get the revenge on his colleagues who had in the past ignored him most of the time.

He listened attentively to what had been said, and on Monday evenings he would secretly meet the Prime Minister, revelling in his new role. He looked forward to those Mondays like a child going to the cinema. He always imagined old age to be dull and uneventful, but this sudden opportunity of becoming the Prime Minister's confidant and spying on his colleagues made him feel energized. He didn't feel pain in his arthritic joints, nor did his weak heart trouble him any longer. A widower for several years, he now felt it was the right time to find a new spouse and have some fun.


Two notes:
On getting revenge, you could say it as I did, or you could say "...now saw his chance to avenge himself on (the) colleagues who had in the past ignored him most of the time.
(revenge and avenge have slightly different meanings, but in this case I think both will work)

On being a widower, you could say it as I did, or perhaps, "A widower since his wife passed/died some years earlier/ago,...he felt it was time..."