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Profile: Drag0nspeaker
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User Name: Drag0nspeaker
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Interests: Life, languages, Scientology
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Joined: Monday, September 12, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 8:00:06 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Should have gone, would be
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 7:59:14 PM
Hello Joe Kim.

They could both be used, and they really express the same idea.
If you analyse the words and phrases, they say a slightly different thing - but the 'message' is the same.

You should have gone that way, it would have been faster.
This is a hypothetical (unreal) statement. It is all about a past journey.

You should have gone that way, it would be faster.
This is abbreviated, conversational language.
In full it would be something like:
You should have gone that way. Next time, try going that way, it would be faster.
or
You should have gone that way. If someone went that way, it would be faster.

The overall 'message' for all these is "That way is faster."

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: The Real Memes
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 7:48:06 PM
Hello FounDit, Hope (and Epi when you get back).

I have some ideas - partly in agreement with FounDit but sadly also disagreeing. This is 'sadly' for the world and the huperson race (joke!Whistle ), not sadly for him and me (we seem to be quite used to agreeing 'partly' on a lot of things).

I agree that, ultimately, we have a choice. In an extreme analysis, we are each responsible for the future of the whole planet. If I had struggled and fought and persuaded the right generals and politicians forty, fifty years ago, I would be the dictator of the planet now, and could mandate the policies which I feel would make life better for everyone on the planet. I didn't - I'm responsible.

On a slightly smaller scale, each person is responsible for accepting ideas.
However, we (the people who at least try to look at both sides and find a Truth among all the 'facts' which are thrown at us) are a small minority. Most don't even have the responsibility-level to try.

Another point (which comes into the realm of 'memes') is that, particularly as children when we are developing our view of the world, we are only exposed to one side, very often.
I may seem to go on about this a bit, but, looking back at the 1950s and 60s (my childhood and teens),what was 'popular reading' portrayed all Germans as belligerent, 'The French' as a bit stupid, 'The Russians' as both stupid and belligerent, 'The Americans' as loud-mouthed ignorant louts.
How many other ideas were given to me without my even knowing that another side existed, I have no idea.
One obvious one which I have recognised:
"You have fun by getting drunk" - it took me about eight years (ages 16 to 24) to learn by experience that I had a lot more fun when I was sober. From age six, I had only ever known that drinking was a way of having fun which adults had, but was forbidden for me.

The kids of today have a much wider scope with the internet - but what they watch is "what kids watch" - and that is very one-sided (for each social group and country).

A solution? I can only see educational reform as a long-term hope.
Meanwhile persuading one or two people at a time that the ideas they have never questioned - which they have known since they started to speak - may not be the only way to look at things.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: On Political Correctness
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 7:02:52 PM
Ah! I understand.


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Topic: Stretch
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:55:14 PM
Hello teachersalah.
Welcome to the forum!

stretch n.
5.a. A continuous period of time.

American Heritage

You (or the original article) have a few typographical errors.

For a long, uncomfortable stretch this season, no one really seemed to know what, exactly, the blue jackets were.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: 'Many a '
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:48:19 PM
The thing which seems to 'not quite fit' is the 'at' (and IMcRout is correct that the sequence sound a little odd).

"Place" can mean either "a point in space" (which uses 'at') - or "an area, town or neighbourhood" (which uses 'in').

Meet me at a place of your choosing. (a single location)
We should meed in some place like Soho. (a district)

If I were to say this in my normal idiom, I would say:
"In many places the polling was marred by violence."

If you want to use 'many a place', the way I would expect would be:
"In many a place, the polling was marred by violence."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: conditioNAL
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:22:40 PM
Hi!
I'm also not very happy with "would" and the simple present. It seems more natural to me to use the subjunctive (or simple past form) 'lent' with 'would'.

I don't know about the commas - the sentences don't seem to need a pause.

"He would help you if you lent him $10."
"He will help you if you lend him $10."

He would help you if you lend him $10. - ??

To me 'shall' seems wrong.
"Should" does not seem to make sense to me.
It can be used with a present tense condition - but not this particular condition 0f $10.
"He should help you, if it's possible."

5) He can help you, if you lend him $10.
6) He could help you, if you lend/lent him $10.
7) He may help you, if you lend him $10.
8) He might help you, if you lend him $10.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Grammar
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 6:07:53 PM
Hi Amybal.
I think that both FounDit and I are having difficulty because we don't know any of the names.
I think that:
Lawak Ke Der is a stand-up comedy show.
Istana Budaya is a place (either a town or a theatre)
Harith Iskandar, Nabil, Jozan and Boboi are comedians
Harith Iskandar is the leader of the group
Dato' Afdlin Shauki is also known as "Nabil"
Raja Lawak is a show
Hans Isaac is a famous producer, director and actor - and is the director

If that is all true, then it would read like this:
Short summary
Hilarity ensues! An ensemble of comedians are ready to entertain you today. Harith Iskandar, Nabil, Jozan and Boboi are ready in Istana Budaya to keep you laughing harder and louder!

Long summary
For the first time Lawak Ke Der takes the stage at Istana Budaya. This popular comedy show features Malaysia’s godfather of comedy, Harith Iskander, and his group of hilarious comics, Dato' Afdlin Shauki, Boboi, and Jozan. It is directed by the famous producer, director and actor, Hans Isaac of Raja Lawak fame, and features Nabil as host and performer.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Is the list correctly punctuated?
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:52:27 PM
There are some 'firm' rules about punctuation, but also many 'styles' which differ.

One point which seems to be agreed upon by everyone is that a list of simple items (short noun-phrases) is separated by commas - but a list of longer, more complex items is separated by semi-colons (because you will sometimes need to use a comma within an item) and is preceded by a colon.

The group consisted of three boys, two girls and four adults.
The group consisted of: three boys, aged between six and nine, who were brothers; two eight-year-old girls, who were not related; and four adults, who were the children's guardians.

I would like to explain the Buddhist terms "The Lotus Sutra", "The Essential teaching" and "Tiantai".


If you make that last one into a numbered list, it seems natural to use commas, as they are fairly 'simple' phrases.

I would like to explain the following Buddhist terms:

1. The Lotus Sutra,
2. The Essential teaching, and
3. Tiantai.

However, I agree with FounDit - it would not seem unnatural to omit the commas (and the "and") - because the items are separated by the use of separate lines. The punctuation is not necessary.

I would like to explain the following Buddhist terms:

1. The Lotus Sutra
2. The Essential teaching
3. Tiantai.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Email?
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 5:29:24 PM
One of the problems I had was that I did not know the idiomatic verb (to key in). I've never heard or seen it used (I have known a completely different, very specialised technical meaning of 'to key in', but that obviously was not the right meaning).

Now I've found it - it means 'to type'.
"Please key in your name and address in the spaces provided" = "Please type your name and address in the spaces provided".

True: If there is an episodic title on TPS, we will key in on AMC into the title tab.

(. . . we will type "AMC" in the title tab".



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Has been shown to be
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:50:29 PM
"to be" is an infinitive - it is part of the verb-phrase "has been shown to be".
Infinitives do not have a subject.

The subject is "Iron isomaltoside"
The verb is "has been shown to be"
The (adjectival phrase) complement is "non-inferior to IV iron sucrose"
"in an RCT" is a prepositional phrase (an adverbial, modifying "Iron isomaltoside has been shown to be non-inferior to IV iron sucrose").


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!

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