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Profile: Drag0nspeaker
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User Name: Drag0nspeaker
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Monday, September 12, 2011
Last Visit: Friday, May 7, 2021 2:51:56 PM
Number of Posts: 35,097
[3.39% of all post / 9.95 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: His face was full of contempt.
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 2:49:57 PM
Thanks!
I never read King Lear.
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COME IN NEW WORDS (continued 2014 edition)
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 12:59:06 PM

arachnid
Topic: change one letter game
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 12:57:18 PM

The road leading into the mire is the problem.
Topic: Picture Association Game WITH ONLY STILLS FROM MOVIES, TV SERIES/FILMS
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 12:54:25 PM
anton-Юрий wrote:
Village Of The Damned (1960 CE)
- based on "The Midwich Cuckoos" by John Wyndham. The book was better than the film, I think.



Avengers - Infinity War
Topic: song title association
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 12:38:21 PM

Doom Unto Others - Czarface & MF Doom
Topic: association game
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 12:28:36 PM

röntgen
Topic: word association(Psychoanalysis)
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 12:26:51 PM

malware
Topic: Paddlefoot
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 11:59:18 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
But that’s not a widely cited source.

But it's a fun dictionary to read sometimes.
Topic: His face was full of contempt.
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 11:52:34 AM
thar wrote:
Ah, is that the new Justin Bieber? Think

'Fraid not.
John Guillim - scholar and Officer of Arms - wrote it in about 1610.

Topic: With
Posted: Friday, May 7, 2021 11:43:02 AM
Yes - as FounDit shows, "deadliest" modifies "woman with a knife".
Several women in the world are deadly with a knife, that is 'deadly when using a knife as a weapon'- but she is the MOST deadly of them.

I understand the difficulty with "pretty" - it depends HOW it is said, how much of an intensifier it is.

He's pretty smart. - This could be said with stress on "pretty" and a definite 'unstress' on "smart". It would mean that he's not smart, but better than stupid. It might be followed by "But . . ."
He's pretty smart, but doesn't have the confidence to be a leader.
It's a moderator here - not really 'dumbing it down' - "moderately, not very".

He's pretty smart, considering his lack of education. - This could be said with stress on "smart". It would sound admiring - as if he's smart, but limited a bit by his lack of education. It's an intensifier here - "quite" or "very".