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Profile: Drag0nspeaker
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User Name: Drag0nspeaker
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Joined: Monday, September 12, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, December 14, 2017 1:42:49 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: The active form of "don't believe it has to be installed"
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 1:17:54 PM
I think really, the point is that the normal, understandable, and simplest form is
"Chrome must be closed to clean the cache."

Trying to change it to some sort of active form is a bit of n exercise in futility - they will all sound 'not quite right' to anyone who knows English.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: "Used" + "infinitive" Vs. "To be" + "Used/accustomed" + "infinitive".
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 1:11:19 PM
That's correct in British English to.

The past tense habitual can be made with "used to +infinitive".

The idiom "used to" meaning "accustomed to" or "acclimatised to" is followed by a noun or gerund or noun phrase.

I used to go to school. (The past habitual tense of the verb 'go').

I got used to school. (I became accustomed to being at school)
I got used to going to school. (I became accustomed to going to school)
I got used to going to school in snow at minus twenty. (I became acclimatised to the cold)

People used to bid farewell to others by saying "God be with you", which turned into the now common word "Goodbye".

People were used to bidding farewell to others by saying "God be with you", which turned into the now common word "Goodbye".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Honest people such as they/them are hard to find.
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 1:01:28 PM
It still sounds a bit strained to me.

You have the OBJECT of the preposition (them) being the subject of a verb (are).

"Them are hard to find" just doesn't sound right - even if it is!

It is better to swap the sentence round and make it the object of both.

It's hard to find honest people like them.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: The corridors crowded with sick and whiny people
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 12:57:46 PM
It CAN mean that - but it is not the meaning of the word.

If you called someone a whining coward or a whining wimp, then yes - it can mean the same as whingeing - but it's not the main meaning.

"Whine" is a normal verb and whiney is an adjective which someone may invent to mean "making a high-pitched sound as if in pain".

It is not in the 'ordinary' dictionaries (the Collins in TFD, my Oxford Concise, the Websters College Dictionary).
I did find it in the full Oxford.
It's main definition is "Having a drawn-out, high-pitched, unpleasant sound", and it has a secondary definition of "having a complaining tone".

It would seem like you only know the minor (slightly idiomatic) definition and not the real one.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: done in a pinch
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 12:44:38 PM
There are two phrases - 'he would have done' and 'in a pinch'

do
- vb
11.a. To be sufficient in meeting the needs of; serve: This room will do us very nicely.


in a pinch
In an emergency, when hard-pressed


He's a little bit old, but he would have done in a pinch.He's a little bit old, but in an emergency, he would have been satisfactory.

The text given does not say what he might be satisfactory for.
I can't even tell who said it - Veta, Ellwood, Harvey or someone else.


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Topic: high mark / high marks
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 12:00:37 PM
No - it's true.
That was the 'O'-Level I failed.

I was very knowledgeable about the play (the Shakespeare one with Scottish kings and witches), but *Groan* David Copperfield! I hated it.
Answering questions like "Why was David so antipathetic to his guardian?" - Because he was a creep!
It's not the sort of thing the examiners wanted.
"Critique the style of the book in your own words" - "I couldn't stand it. It was boring, defeatist and miserable."
that wouldn't gain me any marks either.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Which verb should I use?
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 11:53:04 AM
Hi!
The tense of the verb depends on how you are looking at time.

Because it is NOW (you are using the present tense in the first part of the sentence) "He is glad" - you cannot use the past perfect (had listened). The past perfect looks at one past incident from a different past time.

If you consider that John listened to his teacher ONCE in one single incident (then followed the advice for two months), then it would be the simple past tense - he listened.

If you consider that he had that single conversation, but 'listened to the teacher' for the whole period of two months, then you would use the perfect "has listened".

Personally, I would use the simple past.

John is glad that he listened to his teacher.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: You should deal with him in the same way [deal with <=> sb/sth as a transitive phrasal verb]
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 11:41:36 AM
Hi A Cooperator!

To answer the original question, the adverbial phrase you need is "in the same way as . . ."

"You should deal with him in the same way you deal with others."
"I am not sure how to deal with the situation at work." - "You can deal with the situation at work in the same way you deal with other situations.
"I am not sure how to deal with the situation at work." - "You can deal with the situation at work in the usual way.


*******************
If your translating materials give you phrases like "deal with something with the same way" or "What is meant with 'I'?" - then you need to get new materials or a new program. That one is wrong.

*******************
I don't know where your rule comes from, but "deal with" is a usually phrasal verb.
It is the same with some other phrasal verbs - like "put out".
The ship put out of the harbour. (It sailed out through the harbour gates)
You cannot say "The ship put the harbour out."

deal - verb
. . .
phrasal verb
deal with
1. To be occupied or concerned with:
consider, take up, treat.
Idiom: have to do with.
2. To behave in a specified way toward:

The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus

It is possible that you can use the verb "deal" to mean 'make a deal' and the 'with' as a normal preposition - but it is very unusual.

Normally - 'deal with' is used as a single verb. It cannot be split.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Which verb should I use in each of the sentences?
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 11:05:25 AM
All five suggestions are 'OK'.

In traditional grammar (as I learned, a little, in the middle of the last century), it would be fairly normal to use:

He would rather she stop calling him "Idiot".
He would prefer that she stop calling him "Idiot".


We most commonly use the subjunctive mood to express desires or wishes; to express commands, suggestions, requests, or statements of necessity; or to describe hypothetical outcomes that depend on certain conditions.
Farlex Grammar

In more modern days, no-one knows about the subjunctive, except a few old-timers and foreign students of English - so

He would rather she stopped calling him "Idiot".
He would prefer that she stopped calling him "Idiot".

became more common.

PJHarveys suggestion is a different style - it uses a conditional 'if' clause - but it works OK.

In normal use, there is no real difference between 'rather' and 'prefer'.
I think I remember someone saying that they had been taught to use 'prefer' for things, concrete items, and 'rather' for ideas, concepts and actions. However if that IS something a few people have been told, it is not worth bothering about because 90% of British people do not know it.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Topic: Honest people such as they/them are hard to find.
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 10:48:56 AM
Hello Koh Elaine.

In this sentence, it should be 'they'.
In other sentences it may be 'them'.

The 'rule' or 'test' is to remove the rest of the phrase.

They are hard to find.
Therefor, "Honest people such as they are hard to find."

It is hard to find them.

Therefor, "It is hard to find honest people such as them."




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!

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