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Profile: Audiendus
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User Name: Audiendus
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Interests: Language, philosophy, music
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Joined: Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 11:15:38 PM
Number of Posts: 4,337
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: It could well be that it is ...
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 7:32:03 AM
onsen wrote:
In what way are the two sentences different in meaning?
I suppose they have almost the same meaning.


There is no real difference in meaning. The phrase 'that it is' is unnecessary.
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 6:51:53 PM
pulsation
Topic: How likely would you be to recommend [.... would .. subject ... be ....]
Posted: Tuesday, October 17, 2017 9:10:27 AM
A cooperator wrote:
First of all, my question is that I asked if what are written in blue colour in examples below are adjectives as Thar said "Because it is an adjective - I am likely... I would be likely". However, what are written in red colour are verbs.

Yes (except that "how" is an adverb). I am sure thar meant that "likely" is an adjective.

A cooperator wrote:
Secondly: I noticed the questions in these constructions are indirect questions, in particular in "How likely is it that you would recommend....?" AND "What is the probability that you would recommend …?". Thus, On which verb would the answer of those constructions be reflected?. In other words, the answer for 'how likely is it you would recommend......' would be as 'It is extremely likely that I would recommend....' or as 'I would be extremely likely"
Also, the answer of "What is the probability that you would recommend …?" would be as "The probability is extremely likely....' Or as 'I would be extremely likely...'

These questions have "is" as the main verb, but you can answer by saying either "It is extremely likely..." or "I would be extremely likely...".

"The probability is extremely likely..." is wrong; it would be like saying "The likelihood is extremely likely". We would say "The probability is extremely high" - but even that would sound awkward here.

A cooperator wrote:
Thirdly: as NKM said, I think I can have a slightly roundabout way of asking the following:

"How likely is it that you would recommend …?" --- For example, how likely is it that you would recommend Tadhamon Bank to a friend or colleague?
It is Not at all likely to recommend...." Or "It is extremely likely to recommend..."
"It is not at all likely that I would recommend..." or "It is extremely likely that I would recommend..."

Or
"What is the probability that you would recommend …?"---- For example, what is the probability that you would recommend Tadhamon Bank to a friend or colleague?
I would be extremely likely to recommend..." Or "I would be Not at all likely to recommend..."

Or 'How likely would you be to recommend...?'-----for example, How likely would you be to recommend Tadhamon Bank to a friend or colleague?'
"I would be Not At All Likely" OR "I would be Extremely Likely"

Or
"How likely are you to recommend …?"---- For example, how likely are you to recommend Tadhamon Bank to a friend or colleague? I am Not At All Likely" OR "I am Extremely Likely"

Those are all OK, except the one I have corrected.

A cooperator wrote:
Finally: I didn't find that "probability" is being stated in the answer of "What is the probability that you would recommend …?". However, we stated 'likely'.

"Probability" and "likelihood" mean the same thing, as do "How probable is it?" and "How likely is it?"
Topic: 'The username and password combination you entered is incorrect.'is incorrect[Noun Phrase(noun+noun)
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 11:51:46 PM
A cooperator wrote:
First of all, AFAIK, a password alone can be a combination of characters(digits, upper letters, etc.). Thus, I would be saying that a combination would be apply to a password. On the other hand, a password cannot be a combination with a username.

Thus, why do you still say a password itself is not thought of as a 'combination', so the reader is unlikely to group together just the words "password combination".

I am sorry, but I have nothing further to say about this. I have stated my view clearly, and we will have to disagree.

A cooperator wrote:
Secondly:
Then I can say that 'the username and password combination you entered is incorrect' would be rephrased as:
'The username-password combination you entered is incorrect.'
'The username/password combination you entered is incorrect.'
'The user-name/password combination you entered is incorrect.'
'The username-and-password combination you entered is incorrect.'
'The combination of username and password you entered is incorrect.'

Yes, these are all OK.

A cooperator wrote:
The same thing would be for "a combination of video and hands-on interactive experience" in the following below would could be rephrased as:
To see why Rosetta Stone is the best way to learn a new language, our product demo includes a combination of video and hands-on interactive experience where you can try it for yourself. We'll have you thinking and speaking in your new language in no time.

"a video-hands-on interactive experience combination."
"a video/hands-on interactive experience combination."
"a video and hands-on interactive experience combination."
"a video-and-hands-on interactive experience combination."

These are bad, because the modifying phrases (which I have indicated in blue) are too long to go comfortably before the noun "combination". The reader would be confused.

A cooperator wrote:
Finally: I am still confused to distinguish if the sentence refers to two things or one, in particular if a sentence is rephrased as an 'adjectival phrase(an adjective (or modifier) modifying a noun), something like in:
a video and hands-on interactive experience combination."
"The username-password combination you entered is incorrect.'

On the other hand, when rephrasing the modifying adjectival phrases "a video-hands-on interactive experience combination" and " The username-password combination" as a modifying noun phrase like 'a combination of video and hands-on interactive experience" and "The combination of username and password", then I can directly distinguish that the sentences refer to two things?

However you phrase them, they refer to one combination of two things. Since the main noun is "a combination", it needs to be followed by a singular verb (e.g. "is"), even if the modifying "of..." phrase comes in between.
Topic: Game of Adjectives
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 7:57:49 AM
immersed sponge


disembodied
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 7:55:28 AM
vetch
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 7:53:16 AM
village
Topic: much to be desired
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 7:47:54 AM
Romany wrote:

It doesn't quite mean that it's "unsatisfactory".

If something "leaves much to be desired" it means it would benefit from improvements, OR it doesn't fit in with one's needs or desires. It is not unusable, or unsatisfactory...but neither is it perfect. It's just "ok" but with a little change it could be much better.


I would use "something to be desired" to convey that degree of quality. I think "much to be desired" is stronger, signifying that something is a long way short of perfection.
Topic: have you yet/ haven't you yet
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 7:37:59 AM
Romany wrote:
This is one of the few occasions where I disagree with Wilmar. I wouldn't use a comma before yet; but am unsure if that is just a personal preference or a BE habit?

I agree with you. I would certainly not use, and would be surprised to see, a comma before 'yet'. (Except perhaps in Wilmar's third example, if 'yet' is said as an afterthought.)
Topic: Is the comma after "lovely" required?
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 7:29:02 AM
I agree with tunaafi. There should not be a full stop after "lovely", as it is part of a longer sentence which does not end there.

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