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Profile: Audiendus
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User Name: Audiendus
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Joined: Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, December 14, 2017 11:58:54 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: You should deal with him in the same way [deal with <=> sb/sth as a transitive phrasal verb]
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 9:51:30 PM
See my latest post in the "usage of 'out of'" thread.
Topic: The usage of 'out of' ['A out of B' - a way of visually describing a statistic, or ratio]
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 9:47:42 PM
"Get my house out of" is wrong; you can only say "Get out of my house". (I am sure you knew that!)

The permissible order of the words does not depend on whether the verb is a phrasal verb or an ordinary verb. It depends on whether the word associated with the verb (in, on, up, down etc) is acting as a preposition or an adverb. If it is acting as a preposition, it cannot be split from the verb; if it is acting as an adverb, it can.

Examples:

1. run down - ordinary verb ("run" used literally), with "down" used as a preposition:
I ran down the street.
I ran the street down.


2. put down - ordinary verb ("put" used literally), with "down" used as an adverb:
I put down the book.
I put the book down.


3. run down - phrasal verb (meaning "to belittle"), with "down" used as an adverb:
He is unpopular because he often runs down his colleagues.
He is unpopular because he often runs his colleagues down.


4. put down - phrasal verb (meaning "to quell"), with "down" used as an adverb:
The soldiers put down the rebellion.
The soldiers put the rebellion down.


5. hit on - phrasal verb (meaning "to find", "to think of" [a solution, a good idea etc]), with "on" used as a preposition:
He suddenly hit on a clever idea.
He suddenly hit a clever idea on.



Topic: The use or using
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 7:45:35 PM
arshiaazadi wrote:
1- Using of this is better

How about this please?

No, it should be "Using this is better", as FounDit said.
Topic: The corridors crowded with sick and whiny people
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 7:42:21 PM
Parpar1836 wrote:
It's the connotation of "whiny" that seems to strike the wrong note. If Nikitus says that the patients are "whining", along with "groaning," that's fine. They're unconscious, or barely conscious, and are uttering instinctive, animal-like sounds of pain and misery. But, Romany, it sounds unintentionally comical in this context, as though the patients are complaining about trivial matters. That's the use of "whiny" on this side of the pond. It's a pejorative term.

I agree. I think "whining" is OK, but not "whiny". The "-y" suffix somehow makes it sound trivial.
Topic: Is it a program I need to have installed, I need installed(HAVE,GET SOMETHING DONE)
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 9:47:54 AM
A cooperator wrote:
But, if a phrase beginning with to + verb can be a direct object, then how to know if a verb is used intransitively.

If there is a direct object (either a word or a phrase), the verb is being used transitively; if not, it is being used intransitively.

A cooperator wrote:
For instance, "promise" in this sentence "I promised to help them and I cannot go back on it now." is used intransitively.

No, it is normally transitive here:

I - subject
promised - verb
to help them - direct object

What did I promise? Answer: To help them (noun phrase).
If the context indicates that "to help them" means "in order to help them", "for the purpose of helping them" (which is unlikely), then "promised" is an adverbial phrase, and "promise" is intransitive.

A cooperator wrote:
So, could you tell a sentence "promise" is used intransitively

"Don't promise if you cannot keep your promise."
"Oh, but you promised!" [although this could be thought of as short for "Oh, but you promised it", in which "promise" is transitive).
Topic: You should deal with him in the same way [deal with <=> sb/sth as a transitive phrasal verb]
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 9:16:24 AM
A cooperator wrote:
I didn't find any idiom of "deal with sb/sth"+ "with the same way".
But, I feel as if "you should deal with him.", for instance, is an incomplete sentence, and makes no sense. Thus, I guessed that "you should deal with him with the same way you deal with others." may make sense.

See the following:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/deal+with

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/deal+with

"Deal with" is a phrasal verb.

We say "in the same way", not "with the same way".

"You should deal with him" is a complete sentence; its meaning would be clear from the context.
Topic: The active form of "don't believe it has to be installed"
Posted: Thursday, December 14, 2017 8:54:20 AM
I do not wish to keep arguing about all these points. I have made my views clear. Pick whichever active form you prefer; it does not matter.

I just wish to comment on the following:

A cooperator wrote:
Finally:You had previously told me that the active forms of "I must be tested.", "I need to be tested.", and "I have to be tested." would be clear to make them in order as: "I must have someone to test me.", "I need to have someone to test me.", and " I have to have someone to test me.". But, why did we not deal with the following sentence with the same way:

Google Chrome must be closed to clean the Internet Cache. => Google Chrome must have someone/something to close Google Chrome it to clean the Internet Cache.
Google Chrome has to be closed to clean the Internet Cache. => Google Chrome has to have someone/something to close it to clean the Internet Cache.
Google Chrome needs to be closed to clean the Internet Cache. => Google Chrome needs to have someone/something to close it to clean the Internet Cache.

Google Chrome needs to be closed to clean the Internet Cache. => Google Chrome needs someone/something to close it to clean the Internet Cache.

We can deal with the first three of these sentences in the same way and omit "to", if we wish to make clear that Google Chrome needs to be actually closed, rather than (as "have someone/something to close it" may imply) just a person who is available to close it. But in the last sentence we must retain the "to" (we can say in English "have someone/something do X" but not "need someone/something do X").

I have also corrected (in red) some other errors in the above sentences.
Topic: Game with verbs
Posted: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 11:05:45 PM
lose
Topic: double consonant game.
Posted: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 10:50:48 PM
choreographic
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 10:44:42 PM
groundsel

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