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Profile: leonAzul
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User Name: leonAzul
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: musician, computer consultant
Interests: reading, bicycling, taijiquan
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, August 11, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 9:11:21 PM
Number of Posts: 8,108
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: the with a store name
Posted: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 9:06:17 PM
Joe Kim wrote:
Thank you.

Then what make you to use "the" for pubs or restaurants, but other stores or business names?

Why not the kinko (printing shop), the apple soda (clothing shop), the blue light market (grocery store)?


The examples that thar gave include individual places with singular locations. The examples you ask about are companies (chains) with multiple locations. You would need to include more specific information about a particular place — the Kinko at La Défense, for example — in order for the word "the" to be meaningful.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Grammar analysis
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 4:01:10 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
May: we'll spend whatever it takes to be Brexit-ready.

I saw the above in Metro news paper today.

Is "whatever it..." a subordinating clause with "whatever" as a relative pronoun?

Why do we need "to be" here? Is there any clue here that suggests that "to be" is to follow?


You are close, yet I think it would be better to parse it differently.

Starting from the inside-out, "Brexit-ready" is a compound adjective. It is the complement to the infinitive phrase (aka non-finite clause) "to be Brexit-ready". This, in turn, is chained (catenated) to the finite verb "takes", and "takes to be Brexit-ready" is the predicate of a subordinate clause. This last phrase can also be analyzed as a compact form of "takes in order to be ready for Brexit."

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: reaction was/were
Posted: Thursday, October 12, 2017 3:34:52 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
undergo an IV push injection.
IV push injections are safer than IV drips. If a rare adverse reaction was to occur, the practitioner controlling the injection is able to detect untoward effects immediately and respond accordingly.

http://www.vitamininjections.co.uk/iv-push-vs-iv-infusion-which-is-better /

Should it not be "were" in "a rare adverse reaction was/ were...."?

Is it a subjunctive or conditional?

Thanks


You are correct. Either the two clauses should be properly matched as subjunctive ("were to occur") and conditional ("would be able to detect"), or in present tense ("occurs" and "is able to detect").

While this sort of miss-matched mood is common in spoken English, even among educated speakers, and might even be expressive in a creative way, it is to be avoided in written language, especially in a discussion of therapeutic modalities.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Outside is cold. Down here is scary.
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 1:47:44 PM
robjen wrote:
I am going to make up two sentences below.

(1) Outside is cold.

(2) Down here is scary.

Some of my friends think my sentences are grammatically wrong because you cannot use the green words as subjects. What is your opinion? Thanks a lot.


Each of these is very common in spoken English. Formally, your friends are correct, but informally it is understood that the real subjects would be something like "The weather outside is cold," and "Being down here is scary."

It could also be a lazy way of pronouncing "Outside it's cold," and "Down here it's scary."

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: the fastest route
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 1:38:29 PM
robjen wrote:
I think it's correct to say:

(1) This is the shortest route to his house.

Can you say "fastest route" as in the sentence below?

(2) This is the fastest route to his house.



Yes, you can.

You can also say, "This is the quickest route to his house."



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: The usage of 'out of' ['A out of B' - a way of visually describing a statistic, or ratio]
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 8:47:56 AM
Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
1- Make a problem out of it = make a problem from (the material) within it.
2- Get the best out of the BBC = get the best from (what is) within the BBC.
3- Write out of joy for the English language = write joy from(the material) for the English language.

Before leonAzul answers your latest questions, I will just mention the following:

"Write" in (3) above (unlike "make" and "get" in (1) and (2)) is an intransitive verb. "Write joy" does not make sense.


The last part might make sense, in an e. e. cummings sort of way, that is to say as poetry, not standard language.

To back track, I'll confess that what I had written was intentionally ambiguous, and that there is a point to it.

The exact meaning of "I write out of joy for the English language" depends on how it is parsed, which in turn depends on the context in which it is uttered.

As Audiendus wrote, one way is to assume an elliptical "it": I write [it], from joy, for the English language. There is something that needs to be translated or reported in English, and I am glad to do it.

If one considers "joy for the English language" as a noun modified by a phrase headed by a preposition, then it means that I write because I enjoy writing in English.

If, instead, the words are organized as "I write | out of joy | for the English language", that would suggest that I write joyfully in defense of English.

If that last interpretation sounds absurd, then you need to reside in Dade, Mariposa, or Bergen County through a few election cycles. In each of these places, electoral ballots are published in Spanish, as well as English. That should come as no surprise considering the history of North America. What might be more surprising is that in a number of other jurisdictions Tagalog, Vietnamese, and even Haitian Creole translations are included as well.

This is because there is no official language in the USA. To date, the de facto legal language is English because the overwhelming body of law is written in that language, or some legalistic semblance thereof, but although there have been a number of referendums to legally establish English as the official language, it has never been established, constitutionally, nor in the legal codes.
Think

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: The usage of 'out of' ['A out of B' - a way of visually describing a statistic, or ratio]
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 5:52:05 AM
Audiendus wrote:

A cooperator wrote:
Thirdly: Also, "place out of the ELC..." in this sentence below would be "prepositional phrase 'out of'" category, as in "He went out of the house."?
To place out of the ELC requirement students in this category may choose to take and pass the Stevens English Communication Proficiency Exam (ECPE) administered by Stevens upon arrival. (There is a $50 fee for this test.).

I am unfamiliar with this use of the phrase "place out of". It seems to mean "be exempt from" in the above sentence. Perhaps someone else can help on this point.


Your intuition is correct. Frequently colleges have minimal skill levels requirements when entering a degree program, and a student has the option to "place out of" these basic classes by scoring well on a single exam.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: usage of "earn"
Posted: Saturday, October 07, 2017 10:44:18 PM
tunaafi wrote:
leonAzul wrote:

The use of "earn" in the passive voice is rather vernacular, yet not incorrect.


'... which earned me' is not passive.


Right you are. I didn't read carefully, and it was my turn to mess up.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Singapore citizen
Posted: Saturday, October 07, 2017 7:09:34 PM
Romany wrote:

But you're right Koh, on Visas and applications it does say "Singapore Citizen" - just as it says "Shanghai Citizen" or "Hong Kong Citizen.

Perhaps it's something to do with the fact that Shanghai is a *city* - and both Singapore and Hong Kong are *city-states*?


This is something in general with many republics. Each person is fundamentally a citizen or resident of a particular city or county, and the nation recognizes such citizenship as part of a national citizenship.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: 'Personal titles' and 'job titles'
Posted: Saturday, October 07, 2017 5:10:41 PM
A cooperator wrote:

But, I think some professors are appointed as the heads of a departments, deans of colleges, the vice-rectors of the academic affairs, the vice-rectors of the students affairs, or even the rectors of universities although all those job titles are only managment jobs, and not teaching jobs/academic teaching appointments. Thus, why do you think a professor must only be "the principal lecturer or teacher in a field of learning at a university...."


Whatever you think doesn't matter. What matters is what actually takes place in any particular university.
Think


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."

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