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Profile: leonAzul
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User Name: leonAzul
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: musician, computer consultant
Interests: reading, bicycling, taijiquan
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, August 11, 2011
Last Visit: Friday, December 15, 2017 2:01:53 AM
Number of Posts: 8,129
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Morning Star - Yeshua/Satan
Posted: Friday, December 15, 2017 1:43:07 AM
Sanmayce wrote:
What "Kokhav HaShachar" stands for?


It means "star of the morning", literally.


In both examples Lucifer and Jesus are in turn likened to the morning star, itself usually a good omen.

In the case of Lucifer, the intent is to show how far he had fallen, not to make a permanent identification with the morning star. Indeed, the word "lucifer" itself means "that which brings (bears) light". The name suggests that he was so close to God that he reflected the Divine Light, which he proudly allowed others to worship as if it were his own.

For many centuries the nuances of various evil entities have been simplified into a common arch-enemy, the Devil, who now travels under several aliases. Keep in mind that for over a thousand years, most christians were not able to read the Bible, except for trained priests and bishops, and even if they could they probably couldn't afford one. Their Sunday school consisted of homilies and hymns at services and festivals.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: 'come undone' throughout lyrics
Posted: Thursday, November 30, 2017 2:13:19 PM
Sanmayce wrote:
Just saw a lovely example of human fidelity towards dog, rare:
Guy Thinks Nobody's Watching When He Kneels Over Old Dog

... watched their old friend "come alive" ...

Made me think of all the 'come+' bigrams (adjectival/adverbial, mostly). Strange, the closing (at the end) song from 'Roadhouse' movie classic came to mind as well, it goes "the night comes falling". Wonder whether 'comes undoing' is a plausible/understandable phrase, in a different but similar incoming event as quickdarkening!



I can't recall that usage in anything written or sung, but I see no reason why it couldn't work. I would hear it as someone coming around as a trouble maker, creating a disturbance.
Whistle


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: 'come undone' throughout lyrics
Posted: Thursday, November 30, 2017 1:43:29 PM
Sanmayce wrote:

leonAzul, could you explain your take on that couplet:

Ho! I've got a little love
I've come to let my feeling joy
You've been away too long baby
As in the go Man go yeah!

- The second verse, cannot make sense of it, as if 'joy' is not the word in use. Love how his gestures at 2:00 mark, they say 'shown', that is, he allowed his feelings go outward.
- Is the 'go Man' same as 'go-to man' or entirely elsething (heh-heh, was about to write 'something else' but thought of 'elsewhere')?

Wonderful, felt it, but failed to get the meaning.


These are the lyrics as I hear them:
Quote:
I've got to let her know
I've come to let my feelings show.
You've been away too long, Baby.
It's time to come undone, yeah!


I thought the stylized Raï beat was a particularly clever detail.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: 'come undone' throughout lyrics
Posted: Sunday, November 26, 2017 12:18:02 PM
Sanmayce wrote:

Cool/hot mintage is 'coolth'.
One way of looking at it using your digital analogy, the stack is shuffled:
-1 Come undone
0 Coolth
+1 Warmth

In a way, 'come undone' equals your 'nullified' state - devoid of control/passion/temperature - which is what my 'get down' maps onto.
I start to think 'come undone' points to a zennish state where the person losses one's baggage and returns to the original unburdened state.


We can agree to disagree about that. To my mind a 'zennish' state is rather orthogonal to the simple -1—0—+1 scale. It's a place where one can accept achievement or loss without identifying with it.

Quote:
Achieve results,
But never glory in them.
Achieve results,
But never boast.
Achieve results,
But never be proud.
Achieve results,
Because this is the natural way.


Daodeqing #30



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Should the two "at's" be replaced by "in"?
Posted: Saturday, November 25, 2017 12:43:29 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Lee’s white Maserati was found at Cedar Avenue near Upper Aljunied Road later that night. Hours later, Lee was arrested in an HDB flat at Geylang Bahru Road.

The following day, he was charged with causing grievous hurt by committing a rash act. The punishment for this offence is up to four years’ jail and/or a fine of up to S$10,000.

Should the two "at's" be replaced by "in"?

Thanks.


The preposition 'at' is correct in both instances. Each instance refers to a location at which something occurred.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: 'come undone' throughout lyrics
Posted: Friday, November 24, 2017 3:48:35 PM
Sanmayce wrote:

Context #0,000,000,025 (680bytes or less long) holding the 'come undone' pattern found at line #0,000,581,199:
[...rl (I'm in love with)
Girl, girl, girl (I'm in love with)
Girl, girl
",A Girl Like You
John Travolta,"I don't know what I like about you, baby
But I'm wakin' up in firelight
Spinning like a crazy wheel
Feels so good to be in love again
I don't know why I love to love you, baby
But your touchin' somethin' in my soul
Suddenly I've come undone
Feels so good to be in love again

And I'm not questioning what's goin' on today
Whatever's happenin' don't let it go away
And I say I don't know what I like about you, baby
Maybe, it's you

And I'm not questioning what's goin' on today
A million 'thank you, babe's would just get in the way
So I say I don't know what...] /Lyrics_for_500000+_songs_in_English/

My take is that 'come undone' is used in above two instances as 'get down' variant i.e. lowering the inhibitions and become open to the surrounding mood, no?


In this example I would apply the notion of "become unraveled", like a tightly twisted rope. The sense, to me, is that the speaker's composure, or "coolth", has been disturbed by his emotions.

My memory is often faulty, but I believe the word "coolth" was invented by Harlan Ellison as an antonym to "warmth": something warm has warmth, so something cool ought to have "coolth".
Dancing


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: 'come undone' throughout lyrics
Posted: Thursday, November 23, 2017 11:44:00 AM
Sanmayce wrote:
Heh-heh, glad that you shared this usage. A must-have for a bar/restaurant background sound, (is there a word for 'background sound', we have literally the same 'фоново озвучаване' but also the 'аудиофон' monolith word counterpart).

'Background sound' works for me. A fancier expression would be 'ambient sound', or even 'ambience', although the latter could also refer to all of the environment—the light, the smell, the temperature, the type of people, etc.—and not just the sound.

Sanmayce wrote:
For example, the excellent resource on living language UD features only one definition which has nothing to do with afore mentioned ones:
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=come%20undone
Wonder, how 500+ Americans chose 'feel sadness' as primary usage.

You are, of course, familiar with the concept of GIGO?
Angel

'Votes' for the 'best' definition at UD are more typically for the most amusing rather than the most accurate.
;-)

Sanmayce wrote:

I wanna deepen the diving by asking what are the TFD top definitions of 'come undone', the Undun song adds another unknown aspect, isn't it?

leonAzul, what 'She has come undone' means? Listened like ten times to the song and couldn't reach a final verdict.

Having searched for "she's come" into 500,000 lyrics corpus found only this occurrence (The Guess Who's Undun is missing):


No doubt because the title of the song is Undone. To come 'undun' would be to get those pesky debt collectors off your back.
Whistle

To paraphrase the dictionary definitions, 'to come undone' is 'to become nullified'. In other words, a knot or bow that is untied has come undone; a rope that is unraveled has come undone; a successful person who loses everything but what they started with has come undone. It's like starting from 0, achieving +1, then returning to 0 suddenly. It's not exactly the same as being destroyed, which would be by analogy going to -1. In some ways it is worse, because instead of having the solace of seeing oneself as the victim of outrageous fortune, one appears totally inept and impotent.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: These are aloe vera.
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 5:48:42 AM
bihunsedap wrote:


He saw the aloe vera pots on the windows.

"What are these" he said.

"These are aloe vera."

"These are aloe vera pot."


When we not sure what the object he is asking. We tell him which one?


If you are not sure what the question is about exactly, you can ask "Do you mean the pots or the plants?"

In context, I would assume that the plants are what is being asked about.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 5:07:41 AM
Konstantin Frolov wrote:
Thank you for answering.

I'm afraid, however, the question still remains: what I was asking about is 'the short twenty years ... has taught me'


I'll listen again, perhaps I stopped too soon.Anxious

Indeed, I did! Sorry for the mistake.

The answer still is as above. The phrase "few twenty years" is treated logically as a single block of experience, as are the "short few terms I have been on Oxford Union committee".

Also, the topic of "mass nouns" is more relevant than my first suggestions. So far, I haven't found an article that addresses your question directly, but this from Wikipedia touches on it and gives sources for further reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_noun



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 5:06:37 AM
To answer the more general part of your question, the topics you want to search for are "collective nouns" and "number".

There is a feature of English that allows the use of an expression that is literally plural in number to be treated grammatically as if it were a singular thing. This can happen with an expression of time, which usually involves a continuum rather than separate moments, or when an expression of weight, volume, or items is to be considered as a singular lot.





"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."

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