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Profile: leonAzul
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User Name: leonAzul
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Occupation: musician, computer consultant
Interests: reading, bicycling, taijiquan
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Joined: Thursday, August 11, 2011
Last Visit: Saturday, June 23, 2018 2:25:55 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Etymology of 'dragon'
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 2:19:45 PM
Sanmayce wrote:

It's confusing how -ad is sometimes seen as -ade and -ada, perhaps it is fully legit similarly to the suffix -dome vs -dom?


Although spelled similarly, these are each very different suffixes from different sources.

By itself, the "-ad" or "iad" suffix comes from a Latin declension that indicates dative or genitive case, typically signified in English with a preposition such as "of" or "about". Thus, "Kamakiriad" is a succinct way of saying "all about Kamakiri" or "the saga of Kamakiri".

The suffix "-ada" is almost always derived from the perfect participle of a verb. Depending on whether it is borrowed directly from classical Latin or from a Latin-influenced language, this pattern can also be observed in words that end in "-ado", "-ato", "itti", etc.

Words that end in "-ade" could be derived from either meaning.


The suffixes "-dome" and "-dom" are also not necessarily synonymous. Sometimes they do refer to a domus, a home or homeland, yet other times the suffix "-dome" refers to a hemispherical shape.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Why gerund
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 11:46:53 AM
Joe Kim wrote:
• To furnish a new space: using new or reconfiguring old for a space.
• To replace or upgrade existing FF&E: accommodate new/replace outdated technologies.

This is someone's writing. Why has the arthor used using or recognizing instead of use or recogniz?


In modern English there is a certain equivalency between the infinitive and gerund forms of verbs. When applied skillfully, this can be helpful as a way to offer a fuller explanation of a simpler phrase.

I agree with NKM that this example does not represent a skillful application of this feature of English.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: What are Different Meanings of 'fee or Fees'?
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 11:12:30 AM
TMe wrote:
Teachers please explain what are different meanings of fee or fees.


In everyday speech a "fee" is a standardized price for something. It is typically used in reference to a service that must be provided in return for the fee by regulation or law.

As a legal expression, the word "fee" has a similar meaning in general, yet can have very specific meanings depending on the nature of the the contract, or deed. In this context, deed refers to the public record of the transfer or conveyance of title, which in turn is an abstraction for the ownership of property or permission to use property according to the terms of the title.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: in this way vs thus
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 10:51:05 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
When we express this Middle Kalpa with twenty spans, the first span is called the first decreasing kalpa, the second span is called the second increasing and decreasing, and the third span is called the third increasing and decreasing. We call these spans in this way and the last one is called the twentieth increasing kalpa.

1. The phrase 'is called' is repeated twice.

Can I write as follows to avoid repeating is called? "...the first span is called the first decreasing kalpa, the second span, the second increasing and decreasing, and the third span, the third increasing and decreasing.

2. Can I replace 'in this way' in the last sentence with 'thus'?

Thanks.


Another way would be: "This is how these spans are named."


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Etymology of 'dragon'
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 4:41:16 AM
Sanmayce wrote:
Didn't get your drift, yet 'cannonade' serves well, made me think how is called a barrage of shenanigans...

shenanigan-ade

As for the saga meaning, maybe shenanigan-i-ade.




There is a convention for this sort of composition.

The suffix would be "-iad", as in "Iliad", "shenaniganiad", or "Kamakiriad".

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: Which part of the day is dinner eaten?
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 4:08:47 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

In America, I think 'take dinner' is common.

It sounds common to my American ear in the sense that it sounds vulgar and highfalutin.
Whistle
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I don't think many people use 'dining' regularly at all (though some might).

From my experience, the only people who use "dine" as a verb are those who prepare advertising for restaurants, eateries, and cruise ship packages.
Whistle

For the moment, I am sharing some of the divergences in connotation of the notion of "dinner"; that doesn't mean we don't share what is emerging from this conversation: that a dinner is more than just a time for ingestion of food, but rather something more socially significant and meaningful.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: How do I state a period in one's life?
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 3:30:10 AM
robjen wrote:
(1) When he was from thirty to thirty-five, he had a happy life.

(2) At the age from thirty to thirty-five, he had a happy life.

(3) This is the context for my next example.

context
Tom lost his parents and two of his siblings when he was 10-13.
Tom was sick when he was 18-21.
Tom was unemployed when he was 25-28.

my sentence

During these periods or times
in life, he faced a few challenges.



I have lot of trouble stating a range of times in one's life.

In (1), do I need "from"?
In (2), is it correct to say "At the age from thirty to thirty-five"?
In (3), which word is correct: times or periods?

Thanks for your help.


There are several idioms for these ideas. Because they are idiomatic, they are not necessarily logical, so continue to ask questions if my suggestions are not clear.

Tom lost his parents and two of his siblings during his teens.

Tom was sick as a young adult.

Tom was unemployed during his late twenties.

The choice of word for the last idea depends a great deal on what one wishes to express. The word "periods" often includes the sense of a cycle, things that recur periodically. The word "times" would express that these were challenges that were more random and not cyclical.




"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: could be the next threat that + a tense
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 3:13:58 AM
NKM wrote:
No!

Since "could be" states a future possibility, there's no place for a past or perfect tense in the final clause. It should be "causes" (or "will cause").

"The unknown virus could be the next threat that causes the people's worries."  -or- "The unknown virus could be the next threat that will cause the people's worries."



To elaborate, it could also be possible to say "would cause", "might cause", or "could cause", yet as NKM has explained, it is absurd to say something hypothetical or potential has already been caused, unless one is writing some sort of speculative fiction with multiple timelines.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: placement of "with"
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 2:54:22 AM
robjen wrote:
(1) This gift is the only one I received with a wrapper.
(2) This gift is the only one with a wrapper I received.


Both are grammatically correct. Neither is particularly natural.

I would suggest: "This gift is the only one I received that was properly wrapped."

There might be even better suggestions.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Topic: When you have been
Posted: Saturday, June 23, 2018 2:47:21 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
Potassium Successful transplants should mean that your previous potassium restriction is relaxed. Your dietitian and doctor can further advise you about how to reintroduce high potassium foods, such as bananas, coffee, nuts and chocolate. When you have been advised you can reintroduce potassium containing foods, be sure to do this gradually for example, one new item a day and not everything all at once.

https://www.cuh.nhs.uk/cambridge-transplant-centre/transplant-programs/kidney/after-kidney-transplant/dietary-information


Please explain the use of "should" in "should mean" and "have been" in "when you have been advised ....


I agree, the phrase "should mean" is sloppy English. That particular sentence is not well written, yet it might be an attempt to simplify the more correct expression: "Best practice with successful kidney transplants includes the relaxation of potassium intake limits as appropriate."

The phrase "[w]hen you have been advised" means "After a qualified medical care-giver gives the advice"; in other words, do not eat potassium-rich foods until the advisement has been given.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."

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