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Profile: NancyLee
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User Name: NancyLee
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Female
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Joined: Monday, August 1, 2011
Last Visit: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 7:11:38 PM
Number of Posts: 262
[0.03% of all post / 0.08 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Let The Death Die.
Posted: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 3:47:05 AM
(Two sisters-in-law but no brothers?)

I'm sorry for your loss and sadness.
Topic: I wish..
Posted: Thursday, March 9, 2017 2:45:32 PM
Angel HI

I think you need to read about the Subjunctive Mood -

subjunctive mood
The subjunctive mood refers to verbs that are used to describe hypothetical or non-real actions, events, or situations. This is in comparison to the indicative mood, which is used to express factual, non-hypothetical information.
We most commonly use the subjunctive mood to express desires or wishes; to express commands, suggestions, requests, or statements of necessity; or to describe hypothetical outcomes that depend on certain conditions.
Continue reading...
The Farlex Grammar Book © 2016 Farlex International. All rights reserved.
Topic: Take an umbrella or else you will get wet.
Posted: Sunday, March 5, 2017 8:16:43 PM
Really has a classy sound to it Ashwin!
Topic: correct word order
Posted: Sunday, March 5, 2017 4:04:44 PM
(1) The store's new opening hours will be Monday through Saturday, from 9am to 10pm.

(2) The store's new opening hours will be from 9am to 10pm, Monday through Saturday.


My notice went to "opening." I have no problem with either order on the rest.

I suggest:


(1) The store's new hours will be Monday through Saturday, from 9am to 10pm.

(2) The store's new hours will be from 9am to 10pm, Monday through Saturday.

or

(1) The store's new opening and closing hours will be Monday through Saturday 9am to 10pm.

(2) The store's new opening and closing hours will be 9am to 10pm, Monday through Saturday.
Topic: Not to be
Posted: Saturday, January 7, 2017 12:16:09 AM
Nobody mentioned Shakespeare's Hamlet quote -- to be or not to be, that is the question...
Topic: Supposed to eat not playing
Posted: Friday, December 9, 2016 3:19:34 PM
1. You are supposed to eat not play.
2. You are supposed to eat not playing.

Is #2 absolutely wrong?

To fix #2, I would say, "You are supposed to be eating, not playing."
Topic: A "fun" Japanese word for Amer. Eng. learners
Posted: Saturday, December 3, 2016 5:03:45 PM
d'oh! Hi Everyone!

When I read this post I thought "Wow, That sounds familiar!" I came up with "Put a skosh (skoosh?) more salt in the soup please."

and then " Scooch over on the bench a little, will you.." I thought that these words might be appropriate to the post. But

when I looked them up I wondered...What do you all think?
Topic: How do you answer the questions beginning with "may"?
Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2016 5:19:53 AM
The difference between may and can was explained to me thusly -
may - permission by authority (parent, teacher, etc.)
can - ability to

You can go to the store, but you may not go right now because I need your help with this project.
You may go to the store, but you can't go right now because Dad has the car.
Topic: Is "who" the subject of the sentence?
Posted: Tuesday, September 13, 2016 3:14:53 PM
Dear All,

I remember my teacher describing the interesting world of the verb "to be" when any form of it was used alone.

Who is she? correct
She is who? correct

Whom is she? incorrect
She is whom? incorrect
Who is her? incorrect

Who is she calling? incorrect
She is calling who? incorrect

Whom is she calling? correct
She is calling whom? correct

in other words, nominative forms rule when the verb "to be" is by itself.
Topic: until / till / 'til
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2016 11:00:06 AM
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1 wrote:
TheParser wrote:
That restaurant opens until 10 p.m.

Is this a regular way of saying what you mean?


I think I would usually say -

The restaurant stays open until 10 p.m.