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Profile: Julya
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User Name: Julya
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Tuesday, July 19, 2011
Last Visit: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 6:39:20 PM
Number of Posts: 925
[0.09% of all post / 0.24 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 12:50:21 PM
nowherenothere wrote:
Julya,

The phrase, 'roll upon', means to roll something on or across something else.

The ball rolls upon the floor. - A ball rolls around on the floor, or a ball rolls across the floor.

Billiard balls roll upon a table.

What difference between" to roll out onto the table" (I get it) and "roll upon the table" and "roll on the table"?
Topic: For a moment
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 12:41:35 PM
Angel
SwanIntheSky wrote:
What does mean "for a moment"
1)a minute later
2)during a minute
"For a moment they rolled up-on the ground in the fierce frenzy of combat." What does mean "roll up on" (or upon-not sure) the ground?

Have you got the answers to your questions now? Angel Do you like these answers?
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 11:55:20 AM
nowherenothere wrote:

If you think that by giving different nouns for unclear phrase the " to roll upon", you can explain the meaning of this phrase,you are mistaken.
I tried to explain this phrase above, but instead of comments of this got nothing except the empty meaningless answer from JJ and others.
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 10:32:17 AM
You can continue to talk with each other. Speak to the hand Speak to the hand
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 10:16:26 AM
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:


If you think that you answer you are mistaken.
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 10:07:24 AM
Hope1 wrote:


You are Liar Liar Liar Liar Liar you are doing many mistakes in your "answers" like many others and it's ok?
Topic: Does a "more" use as a determiner to modify a noun ?
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 10:00:08 AM
leonAzul wrote:
... but also indicators of the comparative forms of the adjectives that they modify. This includes the phrase "more often" in example 2. Think

These "indicators" are adverbs.
It is better to listen more than to chat. (more-adverb)
Read more and often if you want to know much.
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:47:53 AM
How many posts! No one answers... To write something doesn't mean to answer.
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:11:45 AM
leonAzul wrote:

i can't understand what you mean.
Topic: roll upon
Posted: Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:09:11 AM
pedro wrote:
Sisyphus did a fair amount of rolling upon.

You think your explaing OK?