The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: NancyUK
About
User Name: NancyUK
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
Statistics
Joined: Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Last Visit: Thursday, February 13, 2020 9:58:39 AM
Number of Posts: 776
[0.08% of all post / 0.23 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: "We are not amused"
Posted: Thursday, January 30, 2020 9:22:19 AM
I believe it's called the royal we.

TFD definition

Topic: It has been less than twelve days since the day of her death.
Posted: Thursday, December 12, 2019 8:22:58 AM
Reiko07 wrote:

Which of the following sentences sounds natural to you?

(5) It has been less than a week since the accident happened.

(6) It has been less than a week since the day of the accident.

(7) It has been less than a week since the day the accident happened.

(8) It has been less than a week since the day that the accident happened.

(9) It has been less than a week since the day when the accident happened.


All of these sound absolutely fine to me with very little, if any, difference in meaning.
Topic: emotional fuckwites
Posted: Thursday, December 12, 2019 8:16:10 AM
Romany wrote:


And you're absolutely right - when learning a language - any language - one doesn't only learn "nice" words. You need to learn how English-speakers actually use language - and to pretend that words one doesn't like oneself are not part of the language is hardly the way to become fluent in a language. I, personally hate the word "bosom". It's not a swear-word, but I just hate it: - however I'm hardly going to tell my students not to use it! Yours is the intelligent and realistic way of learning about language - and it shouldn't come under unwarranted criticism simply because of one stranger's own personal choices or ideals.


Completely agree. The title of your post should have been a good indicator to those with delicate sensibilities that they will not like the content - so don't read it anyway and then complain about it!
Topic: Divided we stand
Posted: Thursday, December 12, 2019 8:06:56 AM
Hello alibey1917

I would think this is a reference to the motto or idiom:

United we stand, divided we fall.

Further details here: "United we stand"

What he means by this may become clear by reading his book, but it is a commonly-used play on the motto, as a quick Google search will show.
Topic: Is "once" the correct word?
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:34:44 AM
Hmmm...

Once and the other don't seem to me to match.

I think it should be:

Once at about 7.15am and again at about 2.15am.

or

One time at about 7.15am and the other at about 2.15am.

Topic: It has been less than twelve days since the day of her death.
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 10:00:13 AM
Hi Reiko07

Reiko07 wrote:
(1) It has been less than twelve days since the day of her death.

This is very formal, and perhaps in a formal sentence the strictly correct adjective should be used. I would suggest:

Formal: It has been fewer than twelve days since the day of her death.
Informal: It has been less than twelve days since she died.

(2) It hasn't been twelve days since the day of her death.

This does not sound natural to me, although I can't see anything grammatically incorrect. Usually this form would be used with an intensifier or other qualifier, such as:

It hasn't even been twelve days since she died.

(3) It has been less than a week since the day of her death.

This is correct (still formal), in my view.

(4) It hasn't been a week since the day of her death.

Same problem as the second example: It hasn't been a week yet ...

Which are correct?
Topic: Lying out - meaning
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 11:52:31 AM


Edit: the yard or yardarm is a horizontal spar which supports a square sail, as I understand it. The sailors on big sailing ships had to climb into the rigging and manage the sails.
Topic: Entertain
Posted: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 11:33:13 AM
Hi Kristina

In this case, entertain means to do the things mentioned earlier in the paragraph: to host dinner parties, cocktail parties, or garden parties.

She was the wife of a prominent man.

His job was Chief of Surgery at the hospital.
Her job was to:

Maintain her looks and dress well (be a trophy wife, perhaps?)
Look after their children's health, wellbeing and education (idealised 2.4-child family?)
Keep the house - keep it cleaned, well-decorated etc and make sure meals are provided
Entertain - have parties, perhaps for his friends, staff or people he wants to impress
Run committees - doing good works, perhaps charitable work for example

All of these things sound quite old-fashioned to me - a 1950s era idea of the roles of men and women. I'm aware some families still operate in this way, which is fine as long as everyone is happy with their assigned roles!

I think the other meaning you are referring to would not fit in here!
Topic: She can speak French a little. / She can speak a little French.
Posted: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 11:49:48 AM
Hi Reiko07

They both sound fine to my ear. I can't see anything wrong with the first sentence, but grammarians may disagree.

In my view, the first sentence uses a little as an adverb.

TFD (Collins)

adv
14. (usually preceded by a) in a small amount; to a small extent or degree; not a lot: to laugh a little.

The second is using it as an adjective or determiner, depending on which dictionary you prefer.

TFD (Collins)

determiner
1. (often preceded by a)
a. a small quantity, extent, or duration of:

TFD (Websters)

adj.
4. small in amount or degree; not much:
Topic: the subject main
Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2019 9:35:53 AM
According to Wikipedia:

The Royal Navy

From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy vied with the Dutch Navy and later with the French Navy for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century (around 1750 - my addition), it was the world's most powerful navy...

However, I do agree that the line "Rule, Britannia" Britannia rule the waves" is an exhortation rather than a statement of then-current fact.