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Profile: LampsJT
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User Name: LampsJT
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Joined: Monday, April 4, 2011
Last Visit: Saturday, April 16, 2011 5:19:51 AM
Number of Posts: 14
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: transitive verb
Posted: Thursday, April 14, 2011 9:44:12 AM
ludic wrote:
In a recent tete-a-tete with one of our new members, a mistake (in the usage of transitive verbs) in one of my posts was pointed out to me.

Quote:
A transitive verb is a verb that requires both a direct subject and one or more objects.


According to this definition, I am finding it difficult to spot the mistake in the following sentence. Could you please help?


"The little boy had a hard time divesting of his fancy-dress-party costume."

Isn't 'The little boy' the subject, and 'his fancy-dress-party costume' the object?


I did run a forum search, but couldn't find any substantial help...Pray


tete-a-tete? Plus c’est la meme chose!


The little boy had a hard time divesting of his fancy-dress-party costume

S + V + O + depictive construction (participle phrase, transitive verb + O) - superfluous preposition.

The little boy had a hard time divesting his costume.
Topic: It is so pleasant to come across people more stupid than ourselves. We love them at once for being s
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 4:25:00 PM
MTC wrote:
None of this group, intelligent and educated though they be, is perfect. All of us have said things we regret, including me. And how many times have all of us been misunderstood? Please bear in mind these words: “To forgive is the highest, most beautiful form of love. In return, you will receive untold peace and happiness.” ( Robert Muller) Someday you and I may be in need of forgiveness ourselves.

To ludic: You are welcome for the comments on "phatic."

Sincerely,

MTC


I have always heard, Sancho, that doing good to base fellows is like throwing water into the sea - Quixote fella

Gross parachronistic relict!

A sapient mind reflects upon epigrams and subjects the most irreproachable of minds to critical analysis. A sequacious underling... - John Bull

People who use quotes to substantiate their contention are incapable of dialectical reasoning. Ipse-dixitism is their crust.
Topic: It is so pleasant to come across people more stupid than ourselves. We love them at once for being s
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 11:37:18 AM
AJC wrote:
How do you actually assess another as "stupider" than you,Ludic?


Gordon 'kin Bennet. Pardon my francais but let's not go there matey!!
Topic: It is so pleasant to come across people more stupid than ourselves. We love them at once for being s
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 11:15:18 AM
Vickster wrote:
Wow... can you say arrogant?? Truly sad if this is how you feel...


Germans call that schadenfreude. If you're one of those miffy sproglets, I'd suggest pity as a meiotic alternative.
Topic: It is so pleasant to come across people more stupid than ourselves. We love them at once for being s
Posted: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 11:12:13 AM
Daemon wrote:
<script>add2all('quote')</script><img align=left width="100" height="145" src="http://img.tfd.com/IOD/jerome.jpg">It is so pleasant to come across people more stupid than ourselves. We love them at once for being so.<br><br><a href="http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Jerome%2c+Jerome+Klapka">Jerome K. Jerome</a> (1859-1927)


Abso-'kin-lutely matey! I know the feeling ;)
Topic: difference between ethical and moral?
Posted: Monday, April 11, 2011 5:29:13 AM
Right, let's spare some of those agnosic gazes. If all the taradiddle I sputtered seems high-flown nonsensical fustian, I shall venture to exemplify with some commonplace instantiation celebrated timelessly in popular culture. A morally upright, one might presume, Johnnie Cochran would justify his defence of O.J.Simpson by citing professional ethics, albeit without so much as a regard for 'social' ethics/morals. Ethics comprehends morals, morals compose ethics.
Topic: difference between ethical and moral?
Posted: Monday, April 11, 2011 4:48:25 AM
curiousb wrote:
This question came up in a class discussion, and it wasn't clear what the difference between ethical and moral was if any. Does anyone has any idea what the difference is? Thanks


^^ Thar's gloss does 'ostensibly' ring hear, hear! after a fashion. In esse, Ethics are social constructs, memetic and militated by what evolutionary psychologists call collective unconscious, milieu, archetype et al., whilst morals are connatural(nativism)/inured precepts(empiricism). A subtler, pithy significance might impute morals to anima and ethics to the persona.
Topic: Through / Through to
Posted: Thursday, April 7, 2011 10:51:33 AM
musicgold wrote:
Hi,

I am not sure if ‘through’ or ‘through to’ is more appropriate in the following sentences. Are they the same, if not what is the difference? What do you prefer to use?

1. Nine new contracts come up for renewal from 2011 through to 2013.

2. Expenses will continue to decrease to 7% from 2008 through 2012.

3. However, these restrictions will fall away from 2008 through to 2015.

4. 156 billion in souring commercial real estate loans, with about two-thirds of the loans maturing from now through 2015 underwater.


Thanks,

MG.


From.. through(never followed by to) is an American, not English, correlative conjunction. Its English equivalent being to.. inclusive/ to.. exclusive.
Topic: 'anniversary'
Posted: Thursday, April 7, 2011 7:55:48 AM
kaNNa wrote:
thar wrote:
not really, although it now just means a date since something.

Annus is year, (an annual event, AD Anno Domini) so really an anniversary is a number of years since something happened.

But I think a lot of people now use 'anniversary' as 'commemoration'.





The second question had not been answered.


Mesiversario in Italian so you'd think it should be mensiversary(a la anniversary), monophyletic et al. Decidedly apocryphal and you cert. won't find any authentication. Fret not, remember 'frindle'?
Topic: Irrational Imitative Behaviour
Posted: Monday, April 4, 2011 11:05:46 AM
RuthP wrote:
Tourette syndrome or Tourette's syndrome?

Tourette's Syndrome of America (support group) This is the U.S. branch; they might have links for other countries.

National Institutes of Health (U.S.): Tourette syndrome Lots of information. You need to click on links to get to the actual information. Also provides links to other sites.

NIH: Tourette syndrome fact sheet Quite a bit of information on this link alone. A summary.


Misnomer that, Tourette, if only on account of being an umbrella term.