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Profile: DavidL
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User Name: DavidL
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, March 31, 2011
Last Visit: Sunday, November 26, 2017 5:30:22 AM
Number of Posts: 212
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Is the colon needed?
Posted: Friday, December 30, 2016 7:57:03 AM
??
Topic: My Grammatical Nemesis
Posted: Saturday, February 1, 2014 5:19:31 AM
Whatever my emotional state, I would never utter (3) in its present phrasing. The combination of "he either" can be found in such sentence forms as:

When one realizes that his life is worthless, he either commits suicide or travels.

The full clause being : "...then he either commits suicide or travels."

"Usually, she either gets her own way or she cries."



Topic: Is This Correct Grammar?
Posted: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 12:02:07 AM
"With love, I blow a kiss to the small red finch and think of how great the sun feels in the cool blue sky, and how sweet, the smell of the grass and the plants and the trees."

The addition of the comma gives the sentence style!

I love it - except for the word 'great': it sounds too 'American teenager', like writing, 'and think of how awesome the sun feels...'[
Topic: Having left the keys( grammar point)
Posted: Saturday, January 18, 2014 8:26:53 AM
If you are not using the participle form, you must use 'in that'. It is the participle form that retains the 'in' of the original 'in that'.

The owner of the stolen car was remiss, in that he had left...
Only the Past Perfect form is correct, in order to preserve the time-line.
'having +past participle" = Past Perfect Tense in the non-participle sentence.

Also:
Having ridden her bicycle, she went to the airport. (omit the 'when')

She was riding her bicycle when she went to the airport.
Topic: Having left the keys( grammar point)
Posted: Saturday, January 18, 2014 5:25:25 AM
Look at the sentences with and without use of the participle:

The owner of the stolen car was remiss, in having left the keys in the vehicle.
The owner of the stolen car was remiss, in that he had left the keys in the vehicle.

in that: for the reason that; because.:" I was fortunate in that I had friends"

The preposition 'in' is retained when we use the participle form.
Similarly:
The owner of the stolen car was remiss in leaving the keys in the vehicle.
The owner of the stolen car was remiss, in that he left the keys in the vehicle.

'in leaving' becomes Past Tense 'left' in the full sentence .
But the keys were left in the car, and so - that act was remiss of the owner. The sequence of events in your original sentence is reversed, and so we need to use the Past Perfect Tense, 'had left', and so, 'in having left'.

Topic: I would like to ask if these sentences are correct
Posted: Friday, January 17, 2014 9:31:04 PM
Is this paragraph in the Results section of a paper, or part of the Abstract?
Topic: Emphasis
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:33:57 AM
Now I can see the whole text. No need to shout.

To write in all capital letters = shouting.

A sentence in bold is to highlight it as especially important. The issue under discussion in that particular posting was 'was v is'. Hence, my drawing your attention to my reasoning.

Topic: Mawkish regard
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:19:45 AM
What do you understand from those words?

If you understand he is referring to the Star Fighter......and his opinion of such craft vis-à-vis the planet.....then.................?
Topic: Emphasis
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:01:58 AM
dave freak:

re The person who told me about the accident was Keith.

The information you supplied was this was an EXERCISE, presumably to be judged; and that the sentence was to be changed to include the designated word.

If the given sentence is in the Past Tense, then that it is what I adhered to.

If now you're telling me...it was an exercise you set for yourself, and that "I wrote 'is' on purpose because a lot of native speakers, even those well-educated, speak thus"....

......maybe - that doesn't follow the tense of the given sentence!
Topic: Emphasis
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 6:33:09 AM
1. We have to wait here.
this

This is the place we have to wait. : Even better: This is the place where we have to wait.

2. We just need five minutes to fix it.
all

All we need is five minutes to fix it. ;YES
All we need are five minutes to fix it. NO. 'five minutes' is regarded as a single unit of time, not five individual minutes.

3. Jennifer started the strike.
person

The person who/that started the strike was Jennifer. :GOOD

4. I'm not questioning his education.
isn't

d'oh! no idea.
It isn't me that is questioning his education.
It is not I who is questioning his education. : Both would imply that someone else is, which is not implied in the original.
Try:
His education isn't in question.
or
His education isn't being questioned.

5. Our boss told us the news.
it

It WAS our boss that/who told us the news. [/quote] : Yes, but watch the tenses.

Also - and I don't know how much you can rewrite the sentence - but consider: " Our boss told us all about it."