mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Profile: Sparrow
About
User Name: Sparrow
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
Statistics
Joined: Saturday, October 9, 2010
Last Visit: Wednesday, February 9, 2011 5:07:48 PM
Number of Posts: 180
[0.02% of all post / 0.05 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Do you say AT Father's day or ON Father's day?
Posted: Wednesday, February 9, 2011 5:03:33 PM
Never heard "at". Always "on".
Topic: "The genuine article takes a lot of beating"
Posted: Wednesday, February 9, 2011 2:41:02 AM
Ah! Yes! Now it all makes sense to me! Thanks a lot, Kitten!
Topic: "The genuine article takes a lot of beating"
Posted: Tuesday, February 8, 2011 9:08:47 PM
Hello, me dear friends!
I haven't been here for a long time. At first, my computer broke, then my husband and I both got sick, and then it was just the daily life that drew me away.
I am glad to be back finally, I very well remember all of you here whose posts I used to love to read, and tonight I have something to ask and share.
I have been reading "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" by Agatha Christie.I just love every bit of it! But, of course, have some questions. Here is a piece.

"Quite a lot of people do not like Flora Ackroid, but nobody can help admiring her. And to her friends she can be very charming. The first thing that strikes you about her is her extraordinary fairness. She has the real Scandinavian pale gold hair. Her eyes are blue - blue as the waters of Norwegian fiord, and her skin is cream and roses. She has square, boyish shoulders and slight hips. And to a jaded medical man it is very refreshing to come across such perfect health. A simple straightforward English girl - I may be old-fashioned, but I think the genuine article takes a lot of beating."

So, my question is what "the genuine article takes a lot of beating" mean?
Thank you.
Topic: Translation Ruusian in english or french
Posted: Monday, December 27, 2010 3:07:28 AM
Quote:
ia videla chto tu mne zvonila

It probably doesn't matter anymore, but just for the record, the translation is "I saw that you have called me"... methinks.
Topic: Is there a difference between "all the time" and "all time long"?
Posted: Sunday, December 12, 2010 8:51:35 PM
excaelis wrote:
All the time ( not all time long ) generally carries the sense of a repeated/extended event/behaviour occurring over an indeterminate period, up to and including the present. All day/night/summer/winter/etc long would be, rather, a repeated/extended event/behaviour occurring within a defined period, past, present or future.

Any clearer ?

I thought not. Think


So it's all about the word "long" which adds the sense of a defined period, correct?
Topic: Chillax!
Posted: Sunday, December 12, 2010 8:35:30 PM
Thanks, Babezy! Merry Christmas!Dancing
Topic: Goodwill
Posted: Sunday, December 12, 2010 8:33:18 PM
The word goodwill sounds quite natural to me too, but it makes me smile to read all these cute tips on meeting your love. The last I've heard was shopping in WalMart compare to which the charity sounds like a progress toward the less selfish lifestile.
Topic: Chillax!
Posted: Sunday, December 12, 2010 8:25:04 PM
I've just picked up a new word, such a charming one. It's "chillax", a verb - "chill out"+"relax". A colloquial probably, not to use in your essay in the Science class or any formal speech. I heard it in a TV show.
Do I spell it right?
Topic: Is there a difference between "all the time" and "all time long"?
Posted: Sunday, December 12, 2010 8:15:35 PM
All winter long Whistle
Topic: The five rules of Socialism
Posted: Sunday, December 12, 2010 8:03:10 PM
Neither set of rules sound quite life-friendly to me. So where should a person go to have a life? Back to Mother Nature probably...