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Profile: Tomahawk71
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User Name: Tomahawk71
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Translator
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Gender: Male
Home Page http://www.leventgoktem.com
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Joined: Thursday, January 07, 2010
Last Visit: Saturday, October 14, 2017 3:37:00 AM
Number of Posts: 415
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Why "worry"?
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 3:37:00 AM
Hope123 wrote:
To answer the original post - yes, we should find other ways and prepare for changes if we no longer need to work, especially if work is where one gets the most satisfaction.

But there really is no need for real worry - just be concerned enough to prepare for changes. It is actually not hard at all.

But change is something people often find hard to accept and to act upon in preparation, especially if it is a future goal.


Thank you, Hope. It's clearer now!
Topic: Why "worry"?
Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 9:25:33 AM
Romany wrote:

Punctuation seems to be a subject not many learners give importance to. Learning to "read" punctuation is necessary to an understanding of written English.

There is no full stop after the bold words - there is a dash. A dash tells us there is more to come - an explanation.(Do you see what I mean?)A dash doesn't STOP a sentence - it gives the explanatory part of the SAME sentence. So he gave the words in bold and then explained them. He gave the reason he said it; which was because "...we need to be more concerned ...."



What is the logical connection between the blue and red parts?
At the same time, many worry that our jobs
give us dignity, social status, and structure
that we need to be more
concerned with how we will entertain ourselves and what we’ll create,
possibly through academic or creative endeavors, than with merely
providing income.


My suggestion is:
"Many worry that we try to get dignity, etc. through our jobs and that's not healthy. They argue that we need to be more concerned with..."
Topic: Why "worry"?
Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 4:45:08 AM
Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
... many people express concern that ...

Why it is a concern, I don't understand.
Topic: Why "worry"?
Posted: Friday, October 13, 2017 4:10:30 AM
Hi all,
I don't understand why "worry" is used in the bold part.
Do they suggest we should find dignity and social status not through our jobs?
Should we find other ways?

QUOTE:
We are part of a collective intelligence. As our machines continue to
integrate into our networks and our society, they become an extension
of our intelligence — bringing us into an extended intelligence.
Some of the Singularitarians believe that it won’t be long before AI
is good enough to put many humans out of work. This may be true, especially in the short
run. However, others argue that the increase in productivity will allow
us to create a universal basic income to support the people made redundant
by the machines. At the same time, many worry that our jobs
give us dignity, social status, and structure
— that we need to be more
concerned with how we will entertain ourselves and what we’ll create,
possibly through academic or creative endeavors, than with merely
providing income.
Topic: To draw on
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 1:04:18 AM
thar wrote:
It might make more sense if you think of 'draw' as an evolution of the word 'drag' - to pull, tug.

Eg a drawer, to withdraw, draw a gun, draw back (retreat), draw out (protract, extend), draw up (stop)
To draw (with a pencil)was originally to pull a marker across a surface.

So, if you see this as 'draw on something' as illustration, that is a red herring! That meaning is a branch off the main tree!


To draw on something is to pull on it,
Eg


Hence metaphorically to draw on something is to pull on it, pull it out (from your memory, from your past), bring it to you, and use it here and now. - the meaning as given in the definition above, and used in that context.


Thank you, Thar. You made it clear! Thanks!
Topic: To draw on
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 11:09:39 AM
Serious students of the board game Go can point to
similar instances when a single player resets the table; they just RELY on considerably more history in doing so.
Topic: To draw on
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 7:43:09 AM
tunaafi wrote:
Have you a question for us?

Yes, please see my first (and edited) post.
Topic: To draw on
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 7:40:44 AM
Hi all,
What does "to draw on" mean, please?

QUOTE:

Once you learn to see a certain pattern you can
begin to recognize it everywhere you look. If all living things, for
instance, evolve in fits and starts — the pattern of long periods of
stability interrupted by brief intervals of explosive change usually called
“punctuated equilibrium” — is it any wonder the games humans play
would do the same? Basketball fans, for example, might point to
Julius Irving’s reverse layup during the 1980 NBA playoffs as a defining
moment in the evolution of the game. Hockey fans might argue that
by demonstrating that the greatest acts of athleticism were in what
you did when you didn’t have the puck, Wayne Gretsky turned hockey
into a true team sport.

Serious students of the board game Go can point to
similar instances when a single player resets the table; they just draw
on considerably more history in doing so.
There was the famous “dual
ladder breaker,” move first performed during the Tang dynasty when a
Chinese master scored an upset against a prince visiting from Japan, or
the legendary “ear reddening game” from 1846, in which a single risky
move changed the way people played the game for generations to come.1
Decades might pass between the appearances of these “myoshu” —
moves so “surprising and startling in [their] insight” they achieve a kind
of legendary status.2 It’s all the more remarkable, then, that not one but
two moves that may come to be seen as myoshu were performed in a
high profile match in early March 2016.
Topic: Makes no sense! Can you help?
Posted: Friday, September 29, 2017 1:26:00 AM
Thank you all!
Topic: Makes no sense! Can you help?
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 12:17:09 PM
Hi all,
What does the author try to say below? Could you paraphrase it in simple terms?

To their credit, the big tech firms have made genuine
efforts to bring more minorities and women into their ranks. Their
limited success, they claim, has more to do with “the pipeline” — the
available pool of applicants with reasonable qualifications for the job —
than any lack of initiative on their part. But to hear many of the
women and minority coders who have broken into the business tell it,
an unconscious bias about what a “techie should look like” is a more
likely obstacle.

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