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Profile: DHeavyOne
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User Name: DHeavyOne
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Friday, November 6, 2009
Last Visit: Thursday, September 29, 2011 9:24:33 PM
Number of Posts: 124
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Don't let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches, just...
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 5:39:49 PM
All I can seem to concentrate on after reading this quote from Georgie is the song running through my head....


"Amaaaazing Grace! ....how sweeeeet the sound.....that saaaaaved a wreeeetch like MEEEEEEEE!...."


Mike
Topic: There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.
Posted: Tuesday, September 6, 2011 6:54:48 AM
Daemon wrote:
There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


I see he's heard of Harlequin Romance.......
Topic: What a man really has, is what is in him. What is outside of him should be a matter of no importance.
Posted: Friday, August 26, 2011 8:23:36 AM
MTC wrote:
"There is nothing in which people more betray their character than in what they laugh at." Goethe


....ouch.
Topic: What a man really has, is what is in him. What is outside of him should be a matter of no importance.
Posted: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 8:36:59 AM
Daemon wrote:
What a man really has, is what is in him. What is outside of him should be a matter of no importance.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)



.....not to be confused with what is ON the outside of him.......he he he........

Oscar seems to have never been in the position to have been recognized as having much (shall we say) "extrinsic" value.....he he he....poor Mrs. Wilde.


Crass? ...of course.....couldn't resist.....but that's just MY opinion!

PS: I love the footer-line, Kitten......please, walk by again....
Topic: Ambition is like choler, which is a humor that maketh men active, earnest, full of alacrity, and stirring, if it be not...
Posted: Tuesday, July 5, 2011 5:46:37 AM
MTC wrote:
Brilliant though he was, Bacon (and his contemporaries) still struggled with the theory of the Four Humors to explain personality and disease. An excess of the humor choler in the blood causes one to become "adust." Bacon was using this word in a now obsolete sense:

"5. Having much heat in the constitution and little serum in the blood. [Obs.] Hence: Atrabilious; sallow; gloomy." (http://www.websters-dictionary-online.com)

We imagine a courtier of frustrated ambition who becomes darkly moody, hatching Machiavellian plots and schemes.


I certainly concur in giving thanks to you for the definition and the opinion. As I read this, having my first morning coffee, I couldn't help but wonder if I'd ever heard a nicer way for anyone to ever have told anyone else to sit down and be quiet! .....he he he. I can absolutely picture him pushing that hat forward a little and saying, "...stop talking like that! Travel, education, other religions.....what WILL people THINK? This ambition of yours is like choler...."

....yep, I need to wake up a lot more....Happy-belated Independance Day, to my American counterparts.
Topic: How dreadful it is when the right judge judges wrong.
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 10:43:42 PM
MTC wrote:
The quotation is from Sophocles tragedy,Antigone. In summary,Creon the king and tragic hero, has ordered that Antigone's brother must remain unburied because he acted as an enemy of the State. Antigone,out of familial loyalty to her brother, flouts Creon's order. As a result, and despite entreaties for mercy, Creon orders that Antigone she be entombed alive as punishment. In an excess of pride, Creon's "tragic flaw," he proclaims: "My voice is the one voice giving orders in this city! The state is the king. That much is sure!" Later, following Aristotle's theory of Tragedy, Creon has a moment of insight or realization ("Anagnorisis") that he has erred: " How dreadful it is when the right judge judges wrong."

This is what the quotation means in the context of Sophocles' tragedy. Taken in isolation, the quotation can mean many things, including what has already been suggested.



Thanks for the context, MTC. I'd forgotten the quote was in Antigone. Pride is definitely a hubris we can do without.
Topic: How dreadful it is when the right judge judges wrong.
Posted: Friday, June 24, 2011 6:50:55 AM
I can't believe I've beaten Kitten into the forum this morning......wee-hoo!

The quote of the day from Sophocles has much further reaching ramifications than would be apparent. The premise is that the 'right' judge, who may have been known for his consistent fairness or insight into the truth of a matter, has rendered a judgement wrongly....at least on the surface. NOPE: too basic!

The judge who has become known as the 'right judge' has made a decision in the same fashion he always has; by considering the facts presented to him with the legal framework of his time, and to render his judgement, allowing it to be tempered by his experience and his instincts, while remaining thoughtful of any current law that may govern the issue.

Any judgement described as being less than 'right' would only be due to a misrepresentation of the fact (lying) on the part of one of the parties involved (imagine lawyers lying....say it ain't so). The 'dreadful' part, I believe, is when the misrepresentation is convincing enough, due to the presentation, and done with such a level of comfort, that even the well adjusted and 'right' judge can be fooled.

There is little hope left for true justice, and society itself, when the only avenue left for an honest person becomes innundated with subversion and dishonesty. I believe this is what Sophocles implied with his statement.

...but that, as always, is only MY opinion.
Topic: Misery generates hate.
Posted: Thursday, June 23, 2011 6:59:33 AM
sisikou wrote:
Misery Strengthen Faith. Whistle


...and Faith begets Hope!

Therefore, misery produces hope, as evidenced by the Stockholm Syndrome, whence the victims became enamoured with their captors, hoping for a better ending that the experiences of the moment.

Ah, the Human Spirit......but that, as always, is simply MY opinion....he he he.

(I seem to really like the use of Ellipsis....there are never enough Ellipsis in the workplace....he he he....there they go AGAIN!....it's a RUNAWAY TRAIN...)

Yep, too much coffee this morning....he he he.
Topic: It takes your enemy and your friend, working together, to hurt you to the heart: the one to slander you and the other to get...
Posted: Wednesday, June 22, 2011 9:11:41 AM
Daemon wrote:
<script>add2all('quote')</script><img align=left width="100" height="109" src="http://img.tfd.com/IOD/twain.jpg">It takes your enemy and your friend, working together, to hurt you to the heart: the one to slander you and the other to get the news to you.<br><br><a href="http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Twain,+Mark">Mark Twain</a> (1835-1910)


So much for "Don't shoot the messenger"....
Topic: Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence in society.
Posted: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 6:04:17 AM
ashit.khobaragade wrote:
In India there is an old proverb 'Nange se Khuda bhi darta hai', meaning :- Even Gods fear the Naked.

A person who has shunned away all his esteem is really a dengerous person...!!!


Very much agreed, Ashit....a truly dangerous person is one who has nothing left to lose.

I love Clemens...

...come to think of it, if I didn't have to wear clothes all the time, I'd probably get out of the house MORE....

...but that's just MY opinion....he he he.