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User Name: Kami
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Monday, October 12, 2009
Last Visit: Saturday, April 12, 2014 5:31:14 PM
Number of Posts: 229
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: What does Rhetorical mean?
Posted: Saturday, April 12, 2014 6:07:41 AM
horace wong wrote:
I already checked TFD but still don't understand!


Hey Horace,
Do you speak and understand another language besides the English language? If you do, see if you can understand the meaning and usage of "rhetoric" in that language you understand better. Sometimes, a foreign language enhances one's understanding of his or her mother tongue. "Rhetorical" is an adjective to describe the manner or style in which you use language to produce a kind of effect on the people you're talking to. Do you want to convince people?, do you want to persuade them?, do you want to please them? do you want to influence them? Now, you will have to choose your words and use them in a style that will produce the result you want.
Topic: Who is fooling whom?
Posted: Saturday, April 20, 2013 10:20:15 AM
TheParser wrote:
uuaschbaer wrote:


By the way, why are we calling it country X?


Thank you for your reply.

As an American, I have been taught to be super careful not to hurt others' feelings. So I did not mention the specific country in case someone from that country was reading my post.

At another website, I was the victim of a vicious, insecure bully, so I have learned to be very gentle and kind in my posts.


James



wow!, That's so insightful and humbling but ironically, others' feelings are hurt the most by the nation.
Topic: there is or are?
Posted: Thursday, April 18, 2013 8:35:51 PM
cisum wrote:
Hi,
Should I use 'is' or 'are' in the sentences?

There is/are a lot of people in the room.
There is/are a box of tomatoes.

Thanks a lot.


1.There are lots of (many) people in the room.
(There is a person in the room.)

2.There is a box of tomatoes.
(There are lots of boxes of tomatoes)


ps: In the US, it's very common to hear someone say "there is friends every where" instead of "there are friends every where. You hear "there is two apples on the table" instead of "there are two apples on the table.
Topic: Direct and indirect questions
Posted: Saturday, March 23, 2013 2:21:12 PM
thar,
My understanding is that the question is asking the how? not the how much? and so the meaning hasn't changed.
Topic: Direct and indirect questions
Posted: Saturday, March 23, 2013 1:27:38 PM
I'd put it in this standard form:

"How is Europe really committed to that goal?"
Topic: what does it mean
Posted: Saturday, March 23, 2013 1:17:28 PM
Without any doubting or quiddit.( quiddit = doubt or uncertainty or ambiguity) Here doubt and quiddit have the same contextual meaning. They all have the same meaning in that poem.

Topic: what does it mean
Posted: Saturday, March 23, 2013 9:49:40 AM
Winwin001 wrote:
poem - It couldn't be done by Edgar Albert guest

...And the first thing we knew he'd begun it.
with a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin.
Without any doubting or quiddit.

What does quiddit mean?

Thanks


Look up the meaning of "quiddit" in this same dictionary you've posted your question.
Topic: Direct and indirect questions
Posted: Saturday, March 23, 2013 9:37:17 AM
An adverb describes a verb or an adjective and though an adverb can fit itself at any position in a sentence, it makes very good English when the adverb is placed next to the verb or adjective it describes or immediately after the verb or adjective. So with your sentence, figure out the verb or adjective which you want "really" to describe and put "really" next to the verb or adjective.
Topic: graffiti 'was' or 'were'?
Posted: Monday, March 4, 2013 11:02:53 PM
footer wrote:
Although 'graffiti' is the plural of 'graffito', we often hear this:

Graffiti was scrawled on the school walls.

We never hear 'Graffito was scrawled...' or 'Graffiti were scrawled...'.

Agreed?


You're correct and thanks for pointing out, but don't worry. It won't be long you'll come across more of those grammatical errors in English as it's spoken here in the US. Haven't yet heard "there's four people in the room" instead of there are four people in the room? "there's friends everywhere, "i like blue more then red" instead of i like blue more than red?
Topic: graffiti 'was' or 'were'?
Posted: Monday, March 4, 2013 11:02:50 PM
footer wrote:
Although 'graffiti' is the plural of 'graffito', we often hear this:

Graffiti was scrawled on the school walls.

We never hear 'Graffito was scrawled...' or 'Graffiti were scrawled...'.

Agreed?


You're correct and thanks for pointing out, but don't worry. It won't be long you'll come across more of those grammatical errors in English as it's spoken here in the US.Haven't yet heard "there's four people in the room" instead of there are four people in thr room? "there's friends everywhere.