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Profile: yorkiebar
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User Name: yorkiebar
Forum Rank: Member
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Joined: Wednesday, September 30, 2009
Last Visit: Wednesday, June 2, 2010 10:37:30 AM
Number of Posts: 15
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Never use two past tenses simultaneously
Posted: Tuesday, January 19, 2010 9:46:37 AM
There are loads of occasions when we use 2 past tenses simulataneously; e.g. We had a great time at the BBQ. John had fish, Mary stuck to meat.
The players ran on the pitch, shouted 'hurray', then ran off again.
Topic: Oh to be in England.......................but this week I would rather be elsewhere.
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2009 12:40:50 PM
Hi Yorker, I'm Yorkiebar! Guess your storm passed over on its way to Cockermouth, am watching satell
lite TV and worrying about friends and family back home. What a mess it all is..
Topic: I would have my own way
Posted: Thursday, November 5, 2009 4:30:33 PM
Al Blanco wrote:
yorkiebar wrote:
Jack would sit and look at the sea = Jack had the habit of doing this. We use it in a similar way to used to and it adds a feeling of nostalgia to the memory being expressed.
When we use will in a sentence in the present, eg. My teenage son will leave his clothes all over the floor it adds the idea of a persistent, repeated habit, usually one which irritates the speaker.



Great. It seems to me that I understand it.
So
'My teenage son will leave his clothers all over the flour' = he has the habit of doing this (and it irritates me)
'Jack would sit and look at the sea' = Jack had the habit of doing this (and it adds a feeling of nostalgia).

Actually, to me it is the same thing in the past. I can say ''My teenage son would leave his clothers all over the flour and it irritated me'. (Or it is wrong?)

But what means 'I will have my own way'? For me it expresses the intention. Am I right? Doesn't it imply the idea of repeated habit?


Both your examples are correct. In the ...will have my own way...you are right in saying it is intention. In addition, the modal adds the idea of insists on/is stubborn about having his own way.
Topic: I would have my own way
Posted: Wednesday, November 4, 2009 9:21:07 AM
Jack would sit and look at the sea = Jack had the habit of doing this. We use it in a similar way to used to and it adds a feeling of nostalgia to the memory being expressed.
When we use will in a sentence in the present, eg. My teenage son will leave his clothes all over the floor it adds the idea of a persistent, repeated habit, usually one which irritates the speaker.
Topic: The funniest book I ever read
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 8:48:38 AM
agree about Wodehouse. Strongly recommend: anything by Carl Hiaasen ( from Florida) or Robert Chalmers (English) - both brill and very amusing.
Topic: to vs. into
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 9:52:29 AM
Another confusion is between in and into/on onto. Into/onto both involve some kind of movement/change of location. Eg. My pen is in my bag, but I put my pen into my bag (it was in another place before) Compare: the footballers ran on the field with the footballers ran onto the field (from the changing rooms). In sentences with into or onto, in or on can also be used, but not vice versa.
Topic: Mrs Malaprop
Posted: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 9:41:59 AM
Talking of favourite spoonerisms, what about malapropisms? My mum would give Mrs Malaprop a good run for her money: A few recent ones that come to mind...
He's a very erotic driver.
Aunty Zoë? She's OK, but she thinks she has misplaced her hip (on my enquiring how my aunt was recovering from a hip operation)
He suffers from illusions of grandeur.
Another old lady was heard to refer to the lesbian couple across the road as nesbits, and expressed her desire for her teenage grandson to start using under arm repellent. (deodorant).
Topic: Naming Natural Disasters
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 10:19:46 AM
Hey Geeman, you learn something every day! Silly me had never realised that the naming of storms and the like followed some kind of alphabetical order. Am I the only dumbat around??
I think it'd be useful to name other disasters too - a name somehow makes something more memorable and real and brings it closer to you, makes you feel more empathy with the victims. It's hard to identify with a meaningless number.
Topic: "first annual" vs. "inaugural"
Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 10:05:50 AM
For me inaugural has the idea of 'opening' as well as/rather than 'first'. At a congress, for example, you wouldn't refer to an opening speech as the first speech, but rather the inaugural one. A new shop would have an inauguration.
I'm with those voting in favour of inaugural...
Topic: Swine Flu Vaccine Rolled Out in US
Posted: Thursday, October 8, 2009 6:14:46 AM
I know that this reply will only be pertinent to some of us fortunate Europeans who have the luxury of social security programmes which pay us when we are off work sick but ...
I have heard that for hospital workers swine flu' vaccinations (or the like) will be compulsory, and anyone refusing treatment and subsequently succumbing to the flu´ will not be paid for time taken off work. Whatever happened to freedom of choice?