The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Romany
About
User Name: Romany
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Sunday, June 14, 2009
Last Visit: Sunday, November 19, 2017 9:04:52 PM
Number of Posts: 13,122
[1.54% of all post / 4.26 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: 'The phone's battery freaked out suddenly last night.', 'freaked out' is correct here?
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 9:03:42 PM

That was why I asked if it was a young person who said it. The young tend to exaggerate and use utterly OTT language to refer to rather mundane situations!
Topic: 'The phone's battery freaked out suddenly last night.', 'freaked out' is correct here?
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 8:50:28 PM

Was the person who said it a young person?

We do sometimes anthropomorphise inanimate objects in English e.g. "My computer threw a fit this afternoon so I didn't finish the paper."

"The washing-machine decided to have a tantrum just as I was leaving for work."

If someone said their battery freaked out, I would just take it as an instance of this kind of pattern, too.

They're all just hyperbolic ways of saying that something went wrong with an inanimate object.
Topic: go somewhere for a week
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 12:09:52 PM

If you heard people saying this, then they were not native English speakers. We wouldn't say it like that.

The sentence means she will go to someone's house and stay there for two hours.
Topic: Get help vs take help
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 11:51:08 AM


Undoubtedly the majority of people would agree with you.

That's why it's so nice to have a space like TFD - where people who really do care about language can get together and be word-nerds.Applause
Topic: DID YOU KNOW? Lollygag
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 11:42:05 AM

I.M -

Applause
Topic: To be bust
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 11:36:09 AM

I'm afraid I'm stumped. There is an AE phrase "gone bust" which, I always thought, had something to do with bankruptcy. However, that clearly isn't the case here.

I'm sure enlightenment is on its way even as we speak.
Topic: a word for act of placing your cheek on someone's cheek or head?
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 10:37:06 AM

Kissing on greeting is not a very English or Australian thing.

But when we saw the practice was creeping round internationally and would soon reach our shores, we braced ourselves and started practising. For years, on meeting, we would hold each other's shoulders (see? less than arms-length!) and place our cheeks on the other person's cheek, for one or two interminable seconds.

We didn't have a word for it.
Topic: she’s got quite a chassis
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 10:29:44 AM

Oh - I absolutely *love* "blind streetlet".

Poor wee thing, stumbling about trying to find out where all the big streets have gone!
Topic: ...since a child...
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 5:52:25 AM

"Since a child..." is a very common usage in Asia. It's not what native speakers say, but it seems to be used in quite a few countries.
Topic: A rumbling
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 5:46:47 AM

Foundit =

I would use "can" and not "do" in BE but, to tell the truth, have no idea if that's just me, of if BE/AE patterns are different.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.