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Profile: witchcraft
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User Name: witchcraft
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, June 6, 2009
Last Visit: Thursday, November 15, 2012 5:03:51 AM
Number of Posts: 384
[0.04% of all post / 0.09 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: fuddy dud.
Posted: Friday, September 4, 2009 2:28:12 AM
TB wrote:
witchcraft wrote:
LeadPal wrote:
That would be Harry Reid.

Quote:
Could you tell me why he had been called as fuddy-duddy?



fud·dy-dud·dy (fd-dd)
n. pl. fud·dy-dud·dies
1.)An old-fashioned, fussy person.
2.)Harry Reid
3.) ;-)

Ok, that was not nice. I'm sorry.

Many consider Harry Reid to be a humorless, fussy old man. The Harry Reid photo that Fred posted could be the poster boy for what a fuddy-duddy looks like. To be fair, Reid was caught scowling. Here is a picture of him smiling.

http://stopsocialism.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/senator-harry-reid.jpg

Quote:
The lexicon "fuddy-duddy" is used only for the nounal form? As far as I know, there must likewise be a adjectival form to be applied, especially in colloquial conversations.
Topic: The word "bookie".
Posted: Friday, September 4, 2009 1:42:12 AM
TB wrote:
witchcraft wrote:
"...I better apply the term "a bookie" than the "bookmaker" for those reasons when I have an opportunity to say one of them?



Apply the term "bookie" if you are talking about someone who records gambling bets in a small book or booklet.

A "book maker" actually works in a book factory making booklets and books.
[quote]
Uh~~~, according to my several dictionaries's definitions and what you mentioned in your post, the word "a bookmaker" should be a confusing word because it rides on the contexts to be interpreted in many respects, unlike the word "bookies."

Anyway, I'm gonna be mindful of it. Thanks for your tips.
Topic: The word "bookie".
Posted: Friday, September 4, 2009 12:25:57 AM
TB wrote:
witchcraft wrote:
What about bookmakers?



Literally, a "bookmaker" makes a book not to be confused with "make book" which is a gambling term describing what a "bookie" is doing when he accepts a bet on a race, game, or contest, as in No one's making book on the local team. This expression uses book in the sense of “a record of the bets made by different individuals.

Quote:
So, I better apply the term "a bookie" than the "bookmaker" for those reasons when I have an opportunity to say one of them?
Topic: We are not the same persons this year as last; nor are those we love. It is a happy chance if we, changing, continue to love...
Posted: Friday, September 4, 2009 12:21:46 AM
I think no one can be perfect.
Topic: "urinal chamber pots" / do all the urinal chamber pots have handles?
Posted: Friday, September 4, 2009 12:01:36 AM
And eventually, eventually, eventually, my grandpa had to be catheterized.
Topic: The word "bookie".
Posted: Thursday, September 3, 2009 11:54:05 PM
What about bookmakers?
Topic: Quick learning
Posted: Thursday, September 3, 2009 11:52:33 PM
Um, I had just had to be a bookworm.
Topic: fuddy dud.
Posted: Thursday, September 3, 2009 11:49:22 PM
LeadPal wrote:
That would be Harry Reid.

Quote:
Could you tell me why he had been called as fuddy-duddy?
Topic: fuddy dud.
Posted: Thursday, September 3, 2009 5:10:17 PM
fred wrote:
I have been called a Fuddy Dud.


Quote:
Who is this guy, by the way?
Topic: nouns that look plural but are singular.
Posted: Wednesday, September 2, 2009 11:40:44 PM
TYSON wrote:
prolixitysquared wrote:

When is it fish and when do you use fishes?



There is a thread somewhere else on here, possibly two of them, about the fish situation.


Hi prolixitysquared.
Fishes is used (or should that be ARE used) when one talks about multiple species of fish.
"The wonders of the mammals, plants and fishes".[/quote]
Quote:
What about species in the planet Balcan where Mr. Spock in the Star treck is from? Can they be all plurals?