mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Profile: chuckc4th
About
User Name: chuckc4th
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
Statistics
Joined: Tuesday, May 26, 2009
Last Visit: Friday, August 16, 2013 3:26:15 AM
Number of Posts: 179
[0.02% of all post / 0.04 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Synonyms of You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make it drink ?
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 3:23:55 AM
You cannot make a horse drink, but you can drown it trying.
Topic: lap-swimming
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 1:12:31 AM
Lap swimming is in a pool, consistent swimming back and forth, end to end to end, constant and repetitive.
Open swim in a pool is not so structured, water play, water aerobics, etc.
Open water swimming is swimming in lakes and oceans and is generally the more challenging sport in my mind.

Topic: dived at battle stations
Posted: Saturday, June 22, 2013 1:02:28 PM
dived - submerged the submarine

at battle stations - with the entire crew at their assigned weapon or damage control station. Normally only 1/2 or 1/3 of the crew is manned at stations for sustained operations. When "general quarters" or "battle stations" is called, the entire crew is activated, and usually doors are closed to make the ship or submarine more watertight.
Topic: button up
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 12:39:37 PM
To hold or fasten with a mechanical device.
Many navies would use the term 'dog the doors.'
Similar in usage to 'bar the doors.'
Topic: The more....the more
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 2:21:59 AM
"The more things change, the more they stay the same."
"The more, the merrier."
"The more you know, the more you know how much more there is to know."
"The more man meditates upon good thoughts, the better will be his world and the world at large."
Topic: Toughest SV Questions
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 1:45:01 AM
The further reduction of Set 1 would be "Either you are, or I am, crazy." = "Either you are crazy, or I am crazy."

Topic: Toughest SV Questions
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 1:39:41 AM
"either - or" is different from "neither - nor" because either - or implies one or the other, singlar. Neither - nor means both not, plural.
Topic: Toughest SV Questions
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 1:08:48 AM
So perhaps the correct answer for Set 1 is 1 "Either you or I is crazy." = "One of us is crazy", however the way it is in the answer grates on my ear for some unknown reason. I would say "One of us is crazy" or as I expanded before "Either you are, or I am, crazy."

Set 3 could even be taken a step farther "Neither you nor I are crazy." = "We are not crazy." = "We are both sane."
Topic: Toughest SV Questions
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 1:00:17 AM
Set 1, I am not sure there is a correct answer, because no verb agrees with both you or I.
I would say it as "Either you are, or I am, crazy" thus when you seperate it into the clauses, both stand alone: "You are crazy. I am crazy."
Set 2, I would choose answer 1 "You, not I, are crazy." = "You are crazy, not I."
Set 3, I would choose answer 2 "Neither you nor I are crazy." = "We are not crazy."
Set 4, I would choose answer 1 "It is you that is crazy." even though I cannot think of a reason that makes sense, it just sounds better to my ear.




Topic: disambiguate aim, objective & target
Posted: Friday, May 3, 2013 12:49:10 PM
They can in fact be used interchangeably / synonymously. Having said that, I perceive objective to be more akin to destination. For example, one takes aim at the target, one proceeds to the objective.