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Profile: Spahkee
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User Name: Spahkee
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, April 2, 2009
Last Visit: Monday, April 27, 2009 6:31:08 PM
Number of Posts: 36
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Oldsters words and phrases
Posted: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 4:41:14 AM
"What's the good word?" is one I use to this day. I love seeing the confused looks I sometimes get from the younger folks, as it had me befuddled the first time I had heard it.
Topic: the early days.
Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2009 7:44:49 PM
I'll never forget the day a Children's Dictionary and "A Light in the Attic" had arrived by mail for me. I was so pleased to find out I had won a raffle at a public halloween event.

Those two books alone had changed my world irrevocably, and to this day, my most fondest memories were of learning to use the pronounciation key, discovering new words, and giggling at the guy that forgot to put on his pants.

Now had I only paid attention in class and learned my grammar lessons better...
Topic: words with multiple meanings. Homonyms
Posted: Saturday, April 18, 2009 10:45:59 AM
Epiphileon wrote:
... as George Carlin pointed out just about every type of profanity.


The seven words you can't say on T.V. tipifies, uproariously, the heart of this post.

After looking around for a short bit, it would appear that 'Make' seems to have quite a few meanings as well.

"I don't want to seem mean but, The meaning of mean could be mean, or mean, do you know what I mean?"
Topic: Let's play a game!
Posted: Saturday, April 18, 2009 10:28:48 AM
eland -> aland
Topic: pronounciation
Posted: Saturday, April 18, 2009 10:24:38 AM
I know a vietnamese man that says 'yeer-oh' (Zero).

Every person struggles in one way or another with pronounciations as they learn to speak any language.

For instance, how many of you have heard a child say "piss-getty" (Spaghetti). A cute mispronounciation, but with practice the child learns to pronounce it correctly.

And to quote an instructor I once had, "Repeat, Repeat, Repeat".

Good luck neal3456!
Topic: Let's play a game!
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 3:31:36 PM
plies > flies
Topic: Greatest sentence ever!
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 6:44:03 PM
"He had secreted it about his person. Therefore I shot him..." The Strange Ride of Morrowbie Jukes - Kipling

This one, partial, sentence has stayed with me over the years...

In a previous post I mentioned not being able to come up with a 'Greatest Sentence Ever' (nor would I try to). It's just that this one has stayed with me. If, in a purely subjective fashion, 'staying power' bespeaks 'greatness', it certainly deserves my mentioning of it here.
Topic: Phrases that describe people's appearances
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 6:24:58 PM
bullit16 wrote:
I'm not sure if this is along the lines of what you're looking for, but my dad's favorite saying (and it's become one of mine) for people who have aged poorly was :
"He looks like he died five years ago and no one told him to lay down."



Hah hah!!

"Old as Dirt" was one I've enjoyed.
Topic: Let's play a game!
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 6:23:23 PM
pried > plied
Topic: Meaning of "whistle down the wind"
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 6:18:20 PM
"whistle her down the wind"

A most wonderful phrase, as it has allowed me to stop and savor each word.

"Whistle"

A good friend of mine will hum when he is displeased, most assuredly, with good reason. This action indicates a lack of ability to, or a desire to, express what is really going on with him. His humming seems akin to Tom Sawyer's whistling.

"Her"

In the aforementioned sentence, Tom is clearly at odds with himself over Becky, and thusly begins to whistle, as if to express what's going on, in a most inarticulate manner.

"Down the wind"

I'm sure most of us have known or heard of someone sending aloft the earthly remains of a deceased, loved one. This act seems to me to be one that symbolically facilitates the returning from whence one came. In the sense of the sentence, it might suggest a 'letting go'.

Having said all that; I'd say it means, He tried to let go of her.


Thank you for your original posting.