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Profile: Lyricalamity
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User Name: Lyricalamity
Forum Rank: Newbie
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Monday, November 23, 2020
Last Visit: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 5:29:16 PM
Number of Posts: 13
[0.00% of all post / 0.09 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: pull/cancel
Posted: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 7:21:45 AM
How often do you use the word "pull" in the meaning of "to cancel"?
Topic: Contemporary RP
Posted: Friday, February 26, 2021 1:45:29 PM
What is the contemporary RP accent?
Topic: often/frequently
Posted: Saturday, February 6, 2021 7:49:57 AM
What's the difference between often and frequently?
Topic: obvious/apparent/clear/evident
Posted: Thursday, February 4, 2021 2:10:31 PM
what's the difference between obvious, apparent, clear and evident?
Topic: Modern RP
Posted: Saturday, January 2, 2021 10:50:47 AM
What's the difference between modern RP and traditional RP?
Topic: decisive/resolute/determined
Posted: Saturday, December 12, 2020 9:10:06 AM
What's the difference between decisive, resolute and determined?
Topic: point out or indicate
Posted: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 1:29:21 PM
What's the difference between point out and indicate?
Topic: to scream or to yell?
Posted: Monday, December 7, 2020 1:52:19 PM
FounDit wrote:
Lyricalamity wrote:
tautophile wrote:
"Scream" and "yell" are synonyms, but they're by no means identical. Both represent loud shouts, but, as FounDit and Sarrriesfan note, "scream" tends to mean a loud, high-pitched, urgent shout which may or may not include intelligible words. Screams are often reactions to pain or fear. "Eek!" screamed the child as the bat flitted by and surprised her." "Yell" tends to mean a loud statement of some sort, to attract attention or impart information. "The sailor yelled 'Land ho!' from the crow's nest."

"Scream" can be loud and high-pitched but less urgent, as in the advertising jingle, "I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream." Here "scream" is more like "yell", and was chosen because it rhymes with "cream". Conversely, the "Rebel yell", the war cry of charging Confederate soldiers in the American Civil War, appears to have been rather like a scream. Tarzan's yell is famous; so is the scream of an attacking Stuka dive-bomber in WWII.


So can "yell" be used interchangeably with "shout"?


Yes, they are very similar.

Thanks a lot!
Topic: to scream or to yell?
Posted: Monday, December 7, 2020 1:22:08 PM
tautophile wrote:
"Scream" and "yell" are synonyms, but they're by no means identical. Both represent loud shouts, but, as FounDit and Sarrriesfan note, "scream" tends to mean a loud, high-pitched, urgent shout which may or may not include intelligible words. Screams are often reactions to pain or fear. "Eek!" screamed the child as the bat flitted by and surprised her." "Yell" tends to mean a loud statement of some sort, to attract attention or impart information. "The sailor yelled 'Land ho!' from the crow's nest."

"Scream" can be loud and high-pitched but less urgent, as in the advertising jingle, "I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream." Here "scream" is more like "yell", and was chosen because it rhymes with "cream". Conversely, the "Rebel yell", the war cry of charging Confederate soldiers in the American Civil War, appears to have been rather like a scream. Tarzan's yell is famous; so is the scream of an attacking Stuka dive-bomber in WWII.


So can "yell" be used interchangeably with "shout"?
Topic: improve/enhance
Posted: Monday, December 7, 2020 12:59:44 PM
Is there any difference between "improve and "enhance"?