The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Dukul
About
User Name: Dukul
Forum Rank: Newbie
Gender: None Specified
Statistics
Joined: Sunday, May 10, 2020
Last Visit: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 6:57:33 AM
Number of Posts: 116
[0.01% of all post / 4.83 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Formal word for "bullshit"
Posted: Tuesday, June 2, 2020 6:56:13 AM
Is there any formal word which I can use instead of "bullshit"?
Topic: Single out
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2020 8:43:56 AM
Romany wrote:

No, not necessarily. To single out someone is to bring attention to them - but it could be for a variety reasons:

The teacher singled out all the children who were unable to bring food and sent them to the canteen for free bread and soup.

The teacher singled out all the tallest people in the class and made them kneel in the front for the photo.

The Captain singled out the pilots who had actually survived for more than one year in the Air Force during the Battle of Britain and promoted them all.

(ps: you used "their" correctly in the sample sentence. Why did you change it to the thoroughly awkward He/she in the second sentence? If you really want to (unnecessarily) use it, the convention is "S/he".)

Sorry - cross posted with Thar.


Thanks Romany 😇
Topic: Single out
Posted: Monday, June 1, 2020 8:42:10 AM
thar wrote:
It needs context or explanation or it would be misinterpreted - it often means to pick on someone, treat them especially badly.

Quote:
single out
PHRASAL VERB
TRANSITIVE
WORD FORMS
+
DEFINITIONS1
1
(single someone out) to choose one person from a group for special attention
single someone out for something: Katie was often singled out for punishment.
single someone out as something: Who would you single out as the most promising student of the year?


Quote:
Definition of single out. : to treat or to speak about (someone or something in a group) in a way that is different from the way one treats or speaks about others
The coach singled out the players who played poorly.
The reviewer singled her performance out for praise/criticism.


Quote:
single sb/sth out
— phrasal verb with single verb [ I ]
UK /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/ US /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/

to choose one person or thing from a group for special attention, especially criticism or praise:
It's not fair the way my sister is always singled out for special treatment.
Jamie was thrilled when the teacher singled out his poem and asked him to read it aloud.




Thanks Thar 💖
Topic: Single out
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 4:51:41 PM
'This teacher always singles out their favourite students' Would this be correct to use 'single out' meaning that this teachers prefers some students to others? Or maybe... He/she gives extra credit to some students?
Topic: Police are powerless
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 3:54:56 PM
FounDit wrote:
Dukul wrote:
Police are powerless when compared to people. Tonight is all the proof you need of that.

Can I write that sentence above like this:
You could write the first part like this, but the second part is not correct with the word "if" as you have it here.

To use "if" you would have to change the wording just a bit. You could say, "Tonight is all the proof you need, if you require it/required any/require proof/have need of it." These are several ways to say it.

Police are powerless when they are compared to people. Tonight is all the proof if you need of that.



Thanks FounDit 💖💖💖
Topic: Police are powerless
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 3:07:42 PM
Police are powerless when compared to people. Tonight is all the proof you need of that.

Can I write that sentence above like this:

Police are powerless when they are compared to people. Tonight is all the proof if you need of that.
Topic: After four long months
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 2:49:04 PM
FounDit wrote:
Dukul wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Dukul wrote:
Are there any mistakes in this writing? How can I make it more natural?

My suggestion:

After four long months, I returned to a place in memory to find inspiration for living anew. However, after much frustration, I had to return. Life has stopped today, and now rests in the shadow of sadness.




Thanks FounDit💖. Can I write that like this:

I think it's very good. I would omit the word "the" before "inspiration", however. I think it reads smoother without it.

On another point, you could shorten the second sentence by saying, "Ultimately, I had to return...". The reason I suggest this is because the wording of "However, I finally had to return...".
Not only is it longer, but it doesn't convey the idea of time spent in searching for that inspiration like "ultimately" does.

"Finally" conveys the idea of a last decision, whereas "ultimately" conveys the sense of no choice. It's not a great difference, but I think "ultimately" is a stronger word choice.

After four long months, I went to a place of nostalgia and fond memories to find the inspiration for living anew. Ultimately, I had to return home disappointed and frustrated. Life has stopped today in the shadow of sadness!




Thanks FounDit 💖
Topic: After four long months
Posted: Sunday, May 31, 2020 4:30:28 AM
FounDit wrote:
Dukul wrote:
Are there any mistakes in this writing? How can I make it more natural?

My suggestion:

After four long months, I returned to a place in memory to find inspiration for living anew. However, after much frustration, I had to return. Life has stopped today, and now rests in the shadow of sadness.




Thanks FounDit💖. Can I write that like this:

After four long months, I went to a place of nostalgia and fond memories to find the inspiration for living anew. However, I finally had to return home disappointed and frustrated. Life has stopped today in the shadow of sadness!
Topic: Second thought
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 4:43:34 PM
Romany wrote:

And because you DID begin with the phrase "to have second thoughts"...That really means you've changed your mind.

"I know I said I wasn't coming, but I'm having second thoughts about it."

"I thought I hated it when Paul first hung that painting in the hall! But now I'm having second thoughts: it's beginning to grow on me!" (to "grow on me" is a strange idiom, but what it means is "I'm getting to like...Something...which I didn't like before." It's "growing on me".)

"Janine didn't come to the movies - she had second thoughts at the last moment."



Thanks Romany 😇
Topic: After four long months
Posted: Saturday, May 30, 2020 4:40:42 PM
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
This is confusing, I think: "the place tied to my memory".



This are the reasons of using these phrses in bold:

the place that is tied to my memory: I grew up in that place that's why I wrote tied to my memory.

living anew: I was going stir-crazy staying my home for almost 4 months lockdown. So to kill my boredom, I went to my uncle's house after hearing the decision of withdrawing lockdown.

in the shadow of sadness!: I went to my uncle's house to kill my boredom but I had to return home because of their ruling child. He made me bored stiff.