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Profile: Amarillide
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User Name: Amarillide
Forum Rank: Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Thursday, February 13, 2020
Last Visit: Friday, July 3, 2020 1:17:58 AM
Number of Posts: 104
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Felony enhancement laws
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2020 1:16:58 AM
Epiphileon wrote:
Hi Amarillide, I'm sorry I'm not going to get into any of the particulars of the draconian and biased U.S. justice system I just wanted to say that a major factor to understanding it is that the prison system in the U.S. is largely run by for-profit enterprises.


Hello Epiphileon,
this is absolutely a good point to point at. I think they have called it "slavery by another name."

Thank you!
Ama
Topic: Reality relatedness
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2020 4:54:58 PM
Hey Romany!
Thank you very much. I just wanted to make sure I was not missing something!
Take care,
Amarillide
Topic: Reality relatedness
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2020 12:27:01 PM
Hi there!

I've bumped into this quotation (Shepard who quotes Harold Searle)

"It seems to me that the highest order of maturity is essential to the achievement of a reality relatedness with that which is most unlikely oneself."



The phrase sounds clear enough, but I was wondering if "reality relatedness" simply means "real connection" or if it may have some different nuances. It seems to be mosltly used in psychological subjects but I am not able to spot any possible specific meaning or characterization of the expression. 

Anyone here may have a better clue? 
Thank you in advance,
Amarillide
Topic: Felony enhancement laws
Posted: Wednesday, June 24, 2020 12:39:16 AM
Drag0nspeaker, I  loved the Rolling Stones article.

How the hell is that possible? (I mean, that's a usual question I scream every time I look at things in the world and it feels like too many places are ruled by incompetent ignorant kids who didn't do their homework...). 

That's the tastiest bit:
“The hypertechnical legal term,” says Romano, “is the ‘You’ve gotta be kidding me’ motion.” As in, 25 years to life for stealing a pair of socks? You’ve gotta be kidding me. Life for stealing baby shoes? You’ve gotta be kidding me.

And then it names Soros as a donor of the program that wanted at least to make the third crime a serious one. I can't help it, nowadays every time I read George Soros's name I feel that, taking that bit of information as a starting point, somewhere in the world someone is creating a blatant hoax who relates it to some evil plans. And I can not make up my mind if I have to laugh either to cry. World, gimmie a break.

Thank you so much, I really enjoyed... "the consequences" of my question!

Ama
Topic: Felony enhancement laws
Posted: Monday, June 22, 2020 3:50:13 AM
Wow, DragOnspeaker,
that's absolutely fantastic!

I was trying to understand a phrase and now I feel like I have a better grip on a topic I am fairly unfamiliar with.
Dancing Dancing Dancing
 
And this brought me to the hated Crime Bill of 1994 which I've bumped into different times in these days (yeah... I definitely became obsessed by American surreal situation). But I was wondering, do these laws (for example the Three Stikes one) are still in place? 

Thank you so much again!
Ama
Topic: Felony enhancement laws
Posted: Sunday, June 21, 2020 3:14:24 AM
Hello Taurine,
thank you for your reply and for the historical excursus of which (of course) I was not aware.

But I am sorry, I still cannot figure out what the specific expression "to pass a series of felony enhancement laws", in the context I gave in my post.

How would you explain the meaninig of thit expression to a person that's uninitiated to the legal field? Does Felony enancement mean "to make a penalty more severe"?


Or maybe your post explains it and I simply did not get it... Sorry, I am not a mother tongue, as you may have understood.

Thank you in advance for bearing with me!
Amarillide


Topic: Felony enhancement laws
Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 4:05:18 AM
Hi there!
I am reading an interview and I am not that able to figure out what a "felony enhancement law"is.
Is it a law that makes the penalty higher for a certain crime?

Here is the context:

"Out of that came the first professionalization movement on a national scale. State by state, state legislators passed laws empowering crime commissions that would systematically study what were the loopholes in the law that would not allow them to prosecute people they call modern gangsters and modern bandits. They passed a series of felony enhancement laws. They gave police more power. They begin to equip them with various instruments, like automobiles, for example."

I would appreciate if someone could explain it to me, and if there are, in the English language, other ways to refer to it.

Thank you in advance!
Amarillide
Topic: To Square
Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 2:37:13 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:

The second extract does not tell us what the people have to square it starts too late, they have to square something with th enact that they have better jobs and are treated better than in Southern cities against something else.



Right before, the person who is conducting the interview says:

"It's just - I mean, it's pretty horrifying to think about. And I'm just imagining it must have been shocking for these black folks who are coming up to the north and facing a police force that was as brutal, in a lot of ways, as the one they had faced in the South."

So, according to your explanation, the two terms they have to balance are the bad treatment from the cops with a better overall life.

Thank you Serrriesfan,
I wouldn't have reached the solution by myself!

Enjoy your day!
Ama
Topic: To Square
Posted: Saturday, June 20, 2020 1:40:32 AM
Hi there,
morning everyone!

Today I am not able to figure out the actual meaning of the verb "to square" in these following two chunks. I'll put 2 big chunks in order to figure out the contest. They are transcription from an audio recorded interview (aka podcast!)

"There's even an attorney general, a black attorney general in Illinois who's so disgusted with the racism that he sees amongst white police officers that he writes that the entire machinery of justice is in the hands of the white man because he can't square that the law allows for one thing, that is, basic civil rights on the books in a state like Illinois at that time and the racism and discrimination that he witnesses among his peers and within that system itself."

Maybe in this first bit, it means something like "to accept," "to agree with"? Or it may be a way to say that he was not able to put the two elements on a balance, like to make the reality abiding by the law...


"It was shocking. I mean, it was shocking in the way that they had to square the actual reality of not facing the kind of daily indignities of Southern white supremacy and the fact that they did have jobs that paid more and they talk about this. They tell researchers that - they make the subtle nuanced distinction between life in the South and life in the big city north. It's not quite what they had hoped, but it's better. It's clearly better for them. What they didn't anticipate is that they would be subjected to the willful constitutional violations of law enforcement."

And how about this second bit? Does it mean "adapt themselves"? Or something like "to accept." But, it still would sound a bit weird to say that "you have to adapt to better conditions," as far as I know usually you adapt to something worse...


I feel like, this verb is a bit bigger than its dictionary definitions (I mean, a bit more than others), it feels like I am not able to fit any of the meanings I am offered. Or I may be simply blind to something obvious (this happens quite often... things are so simple that I cannot spot them!)

I would really appreciate any suggestion, thank you in advance for your time!
Amarillide




Topic: We have seen it all played out before
Posted: Monday, June 15, 2020 12:31:30 AM
Thank you, guys!
Interesting... idiom aside, "play ou"t turned out to be an interesting verb, with a kind of plastic range of meanings!
I feel like it will take a while before I'll start using it!
Xx
Ama