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Profile: Ashraful Haque Ashraf
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User Name: Ashraful Haque Ashraf
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Tuesday, November 5, 2019
Last Visit: Tuesday, December 1, 2020 2:57:44 PM
Number of Posts: 164
[0.02% of all post / 0.42 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: the percentage of students who owned cell phones was/were below 5%.
Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2020 2:57:43 PM
"The percentage of students who owned cell phones was/were below 5%."

I'm confused between 'was' and 'were' when using percentage. I feel like it should be 'were' since the percentage is 5% (more than 1%).

Topic: learn about things that they couldn't have otherwise.
Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2020 2:49:03 PM
Audiendus wrote:
Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
For 1 are you saying that it would be wrong without the word 'experienced' or whatever I'm talking about? I thought it would be clear from the context.

As Drag0nspeaker pointed out, 'experienced' etc might be omitted in speech. However, the sentence would be grammatically incomplete, and slightly ambiguous ('have' could be taken to mean 'possess').

Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
Why do we use the article before latest technology?

It sounds unnatural without the article; we normally use the definite article for a superlative. It is specific: there is only one 'latest' version of any technology – all other versions are 'earlier'.


I see. Thank you.
Topic: learn about things that they couldn't have otherwise.
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2020 3:00:53 PM
Audiendus wrote:
Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:

1) When people leave their hometowns they get to experience and learn about things that they couldn't have experienced/encountered otherwise. [We need a past participle here to make the tense clear]

2) With the latest technology, animation and graphics, you can see and hear things that you wouldn't be able to imagine otherwise. [This is correct as amended]


EDIT – I have just seen Drag0nspeaker's post. I agree that "known" would be OK.


For 1 are you saying that it would be wrong without the word 'experienced' or whatever I'm talking about? I thought it would be clear from the context.
Topic: learn about things that they couldn't have otherwise.
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2020 2:58:54 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Yes - I missed seeing that "latest technology" really should have an article "the".
I took "animation graphics" as a compound noun - maybe yes, maybe no.


Why do we use the article before latest technology?
Topic: learn about things that they couldn't have otherwise.
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2020 3:05:41 PM
While answering some IELTS questions I said:

1) When people leave their hometowns they get to experience and learn about things that they couldn't have otherwise.
2) With latest technology, animation, graphics, you can see and hear things that you wouldn't be able to imagine otherwise.

I meant to say that without what I mentioned it's not possible to imagine/learn/experience something. I don't know if I've been able to express myself properly. Please correct me if I'm mistaken.
Topic: The sporting event has experienced the most stable growth.
Posted: Saturday, November 28, 2020 2:30:04 PM
Audiendus wrote:
Yes, the use of the word 'experience' can be extended to non-living things. The meaning is clear.

Thank you so much.
Topic: The movie left a lasting impression on me.
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 3:41:13 PM
Would it be correct to say:
"The movie left a deep impression on me."
"The movie left a lasting impression on me."

I meant to say that the movie was so good that I didn't forget it for a long time.
Topic: The sporting event has experienced the most stable growth.
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 3:45:03 PM
I was answering an IELTS question. It was a bar chart showing the growth in the number of attendance at a stadium. I wrote:

"The sporting event has experienced the most stable growth since 2017."

Is the sentence correct? Can the word 'experience' be used for non-living things?
Topic: The average vs A typical.
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2020 3:57:57 PM
Romany wrote:


" 'A' typical X" refers to one single representation i.e. an Indian person who represents (typifies) certain qualities/behaviours.

" 'the' average X" in this context refers to many people: all the Indian people whose share similar qualities.


Thank you for the answer but I didn't quiet get the difference.

Is it even natural to say- "The average Indian breakfast consists of some roti and vegetables?"
Topic: The average vs A typical.
Posted: Sunday, November 15, 2020 12:08:38 PM
Sentences with 'The average....'
1) The average American isn't a racist.
2) The average man dies almost five years earlier than women.

Sentences with 'A typical....'
1) A typical Indian breakfast consists of some roti and vegetables.
2) For me a typical morning starts with a thirty-minute-run.

My questions (given that my sentences are correct):
Q1) Are both 'a typical...' and 'the average.....' singular?
Q2) It seems like we use 'the average....' to talk about people and on the other hand we use 'a typical...' to talk about things. Is it possible to say the following without changing the meaning:
- The average Indian breakfast consists of some roti and vegetable
or
- A typical American isn't a racist. (this one sound like I'm talking about a particular group of Americans and not say educated or rich Americans)