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Profile: Atatürk
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User Name: Atatürk
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Thursday, October 25, 2018
Last Visit: Thursday, November 26, 2020 10:08:11 AM
Number of Posts: 1,815
[0.18% of all post / 2.38 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: BA
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 2:25:38 PM
What was your major in your B.A.?

What did you study for your B.A?

Are these sentences correct? What's the natural question?
Topic: Crystal
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:54:42 AM
Placebos are treatments that have no direct effect on the body, yet still work because the patient has faith in their power to heal. Most often the term refers to a dummy pill, but it applies just as much to any device or procedure, from a sticking plaster to a crystal to an operation.


What does "crystal" mean in the above?

Topic: At/in
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 9:43:14 AM
Hi,
Are both 'at' and 'in' correct in the following?

I believe Learning a second language at/in childhood can have a lot of benefits for the child.
Topic: You're welcome
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 9:59:11 AM
thar wrote:
Ata - can you tell me why 'lütfen' is so often translated in otherwise reasonable subtitles as 'you're welcome' when it is a plea, or a simple polite 'please'?
I have never heard it said as a response to a thankyou. It has always be a 'please!'

I know in some languages the same word does both,
eg in German
Bitte (please)
Danke (thankyou)
Bitte (acknowedging thanks)



I don't why, but no Turkish translator would make such a mistake. 'lütfen' means just 'please' and nothing else. It's a very common word in all Turkish dialects and other languages such as Persian (Lutfan) with exactly the same meaning.

'lütf' means favor, and the suffix 'en/an' means 'based on'.

For "you're welcome" the most frequently used term is "rica ederim".




Topic: You're welcome
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2020 5:26:57 PM
Hi
University professor: Michael, would you please answer this question?

Michael: [answers the question]

Professor: Thank you.

Michael: You're welcome/no problem/no worries/sure/ don't mention it....


What would be the most appropriate response/s to the professor saying "thank you" in the above?



Topic: far from too many
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2020 11:30:44 AM
Audiendus wrote:
Romany wrote:
I can only guess that somewhere, previously mentioned, is an opinion or a misconception stating that 'too many' recyclables are thrown away. She's referring back to that and refuting it: it's not true that too many recyclables are thrown out; in fact the number of recyclables that are thrown out is not 'too many' at all.

But the next sentence states:

To address this problem, we need to first consider the reason behind people's reluctance to recycle.

So, not enough recyclables are actually recycled; (far) too many are thrown out. (Ideally, none should be thrown out; they should all be recycled.)


Thank you very much, Audiendus.

I see eye to eye with you exactly.
Topic: far from too many
Posted: Sunday, November 8, 2020 3:36:03 PM
Romany wrote:

Auds -

I wouldn't tell Attaturk it was wrong - I speculated on the reason it was used here and illustrated how it could be used absolutely validly. i.e. there's nothing wrong with it, in context:

[i]I can only guess that somewhere, previously mentioned, is an opinion or a misconception stating that 'too many' recyclables are thrown away. She's referring back to that and refuting it: it's not true that too many recyclables are thrown out; in fact the number of recyclables that are thrown out is not 'too many' at all.
[/i]


Thank you Romany.

But there's nothing as such in the previous paragraph, which I sent above.

Now would you say it is wrong?
Topic: cause/result
Posted: Sunday, November 8, 2020 3:30:40 PM
Thank you very much indeed.
Topic: far from too many
Posted: Saturday, November 7, 2020 2:28:27 PM
Wouldn't it make more sense were 'far from' were dropped?-

Undoubtedly, too many recyclables are thrown away with the general waste and, as a result, damage the environment. To address this problem, we need to first consider the reason behind people’s reluctance to recycle. One possible issue may be the process itself, which usually requires us to clean and sort waste into different categories based on their material. This is both time-consuming and confusing if we do not know whether certain types of glass, plastic or paper are recyclable or not. We naturally avoid tasks that take up too much time, so it is not surprising that so many people simply throw all their rubbish away in the same bin.
Topic: cause/result
Posted: Saturday, November 7, 2020 2:27:53 PM
Hope123 wrote:
Deleted my answer. I just saw this is dealt with on another thread.


Show me please. Who answered this question on another thread? Have I missed something somewhere?