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Profile: alibey1917
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User Name: alibey1917
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Wednesday, September 19, 2018
Last Visit: Monday, September 21, 2020 3:11:30 PM
Number of Posts: 296
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: set Barabas up to revel
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2020 6:09:55 AM
FounDit wrote:
alibey1917 wrote:
"The Jew of Malta ... was a play that put the three religions of the Book on stage, each found to be more rapacious, duplicitous and hypocritical than the other. In a wonderful declaration of self‑ confessed villainy, Marlowe set Barabas up to revel in the prejudices of an Elizabethan audience:

As for myself, I walk abroad a‑ nights
And kill sick people groaning under walls;
Sometimes I go about and poison wells;
... "

Can you paraphrase the emphasized phrase?

The source: This Orient Isle- Elizabethan England and the Islamic World by Jerry Brotton


I don't know who Marlowe is, but he apparently had Barabas behaving in a way that the audience would approve of in that time period.


He is Christopher Marlowe, and Barabas is the anti-hero in Marlowe's The Jew of Malta. Thank you for your time, again, FounDit.
Topic: set Barabas up to revel
Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2020 2:49:39 PM
"The Jew of Malta ... was a play that put the three religions of the Book on stage, each found to be more rapacious, duplicitous and hypocritical than the other. In a wonderful declaration of self‑ confessed villainy, Marlowe set Barabas up to revel in the prejudices of an Elizabethan audience:

As for myself, I walk abroad a‑ nights
And kill sick people groaning under walls;
Sometimes I go about and poison wells;
... "

Can you paraphrase the emphasized phrase?

The source: This Orient Isle- Elizabethan England and the Islamic World by Jerry Brotton
Topic: the strain began to tell
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 3:02:20 PM
thar wrote:
The problems of being faced with this impossible task began to have an effect on him, physically and mentally.

Tell = to have a visible effect, to become evident.

Tell

Quote:
9. VERB
If an unpleasant or tiring experience begins to tell, it begins to have a serious effect.
The pressure began to tell as rain closed in after 20 laps. [VERB]
The strains of office are beginning to tell on the prime minister. [VERB on noun]
Synonyms: have or take effect, register [informal], weigh, have force




Ie he became ill or mentally distressed


Thank you thar, I got it.
Topic: the strain began to tell
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2020 11:50:39 AM
"Having successfully resurrected his career as ambassador to Con‑ stantinople and single‑ handedly wrecked Spain’s détente with the Ottomans, Harborne was now faced with the colossal task of engin‑ eering an Anglo‑ Ottoman naval attack on Philip II’s Mediterranean fleet. He clearly believed that the undertaking was impossible, and inevitably the strain began to tell."

What does the emphasized phrase mean here?
Topic: Alongside
Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2020 1:50:20 PM

"He occupied a spacious house alongside three resident English factors, Robert Lion, Miles Dickonson and Edmond Mastidge."

According to this sentece, did they live in the same house, or in the same neighbourhood?
Topic: Trade in
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 3:19:02 AM
Romany wrote:

First off: - the play 'The Three Ladies of London" was a satire.

A satire was understood to have a message; a moral; its purpose was to make people think: to view things through a different lens.

At the time the play was written people (the population) were aware that the continual waging of wars against Islam was a bit of a stretch for a country supposedly defending the "peaceful" aims of the early Church.

However, that very Church was the one telling them that the only way to their Heaven was to massacre the Infidel.

This was a dichotomy that many people felt - they had doubts which made them feel they were betraying their Christian beliefs. So it wasn't spoken about, or written about in public - the punishments for questioning their beliefs were pretty severe back in those days.

This play then, raised the questions people had - but didn't ask.

Deep down, the people of the day knew it was farcical - and perfectly hypocritical - that Christians were robbing their own Churches of lead (from which the roofs were made) in order to make bullets. Which would be sold to Muslims to shoot Christians. Madness, huh? It made people extremely uneasy and doubtful.

However a person could make their fortune fighting in the East. And when money is involved it appeared that religious conviction was a pretty dodgy grey area.

Wilson brings this hidden uneasiness and doubt out into the open for the first time...and made the point that people were so eager for the luxuries of the East that they were prepared to overlook the ridiculous fact that they were ready to arm their 'enemies'and bring about their own deaths. Crazy thinking. And he made them realise HOW crazy it was, with his play.

(Sorry, that was rather long and involved - but satire needs a bit of explanation.)


Thank you very much for this detailed explanation, Romany.
Topic: Trade in
Posted: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 4:15:47 PM
"The play [Robert Wilson's The Three Ladies of London] trades quite literally in the topical unease of laughing at England’s weakness for fripperies in exchange for arming Muslims with metal taken from churches." (Jerry Brotton, This Orient Isle- Elizabethan England and the Islamic World)

Can you paraphrase this sentence?
Topic: although his law was to the contrary
Posted: Friday, September 11, 2020 9:42:26 AM
Romany wrote:


Until the late Victorian period "I consider..." was understood to mean "I think..." "I believe" - which it still is today: "I consider him an unsuitable replacement for Ms. Wood."

What his advisers were saying was: -

"although there's no law against the saltpetre trade with Christians, we should not let them have it, because our need for pellets [which were being denied them]is as great as their need for saltpetre."

...so they were supporting Abdallah Muhammad who had been offered cloth in return for saltpetre and wanted ammunition etc. instead. They were pointing out they were in a good bargaining position as the need for saltpetre was as important to the Christians as ammunition was to them.


Thank you, Romany, I got it.
Topic: although his law was to the contrary
Posted: Friday, September 11, 2020 4:55:08 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi.
To me it says a few things:
He needed cannonballs and shot.
The Christians needed saltpetre for gunpowder.
His laws did NOT say that he couldn't sell saltpetre.
However, the advisors said that he shouldn't sell saltpetre to the Christians.

It does sound a bit odd - I think that he may be using "considering" to simply mean "thinking" or "knowing" rather than "taking into account the fact that", which is the usual meaning these days.


Hi, and thank you, Drag0nspeaker.
Topic: although his law was to the contrary
Posted: Friday, September 11, 2020 4:06:00 AM
"In 1572 Hogan had sent his factor John Williams to Morocco to check reports of an abundance of high‑ quality potassium nitrate, or saltpetre, a key ingredient in mak‑ ing gunpowder, which was extremely scarce in western Europe and was imported at great expense from Persia and India... Abdallah Muhammad was not interested in trading saltpetre for English cloth: he told Williams that ‘if we would take upon us to bring him bullets of iron for his great ordnance, we should have saltpetre’. The sultan’s counsellors advised him against the trade, arguing that ‘although his law was to the contrary . . . no saltpetre should pass to the Christians, considering the commodity of pellets [iron shot or cannon balls] was as needful for him as saltpetre to the Christians’"

I don't understand what the counsellors were trying to say here. Can you help me?



The source: This Orient Isle- Elizabethan England and the Islamic World by Jerry Brotton