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Profile: Turnpike
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User Name: Turnpike
Forum Rank: Member
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Joined: Friday, February 16, 2018
Last Visit: Friday, July 31, 2020 1:52:39 AM
Number of Posts: 82
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: "... a sensuous impression such as she had never dreamed..."
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 1:52:38 AM
Romany wrote:


We all experience life through a range of senses including: sight, touch, sound.

If you have never experienced one of those senses - sight, in this specific case - then your entire way of "looking" at, or evaluating, the world changes.

And sight - one of the senses most of us are fortunate enough to be taken for granted - is one of the most common ways we experience life - colours, shapes, sunshine on flowers - your parents faces...having all this suddenly offered you would be so very overwhelming - Sunset, Art, whats in shop window, a view, your own face, movies - the person would be completely overwhelmed!!

Because she had never experienced any of those, she had never realised how the ability to see could change her life, her world, so much. For her the ability to see seemed so intense, so amazing, so joyful she wouldn't have thought a human body capable of storing, containing so many feelings and senses.

In modern parlance: She was blown away!

Thank you, Romany.
Topic: "... a sensuous impression such as she had never dreamed..."
Posted: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 10:37:30 AM
This is about a blind lady who recovered her eyesight.
Could you paraphrase the part in bold letters?

"Her senses had long been sharpened to the sounds and odors of the good, green world, and now
her restored vision completed a sensuous impression such as she had never dreamed could be borne in upon a human consciousness."
Topic: A little paraphrase
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2020 6:33:41 AM
Can you please paraphrase the sentence?


"What about the little white nightgowns that had to be taken from the pillow-slip in which they were brought over, and shaken by some strong hand till they snapped like ox-whips?"
Topic: The violet border?
Posted: Thursday, July 9, 2020 4:43:16 AM
thar wrote:
Yes, a border is a long flower bed. This one I assume was planted with violets, although the are quite low plants for a border.

Quote:
border
a narrow strip of ground around a garden, usually planted with flowers:
to weed/plant the borders



Quote:
violet
noun [ C ]
violet noun [C] (PLANT)

[ C ]
a small plant with pleasant-smelling purple, blue, or white flowers




Thank you for the confirmation, Thar! ☺
Topic: The violet border?
Posted: Thursday, July 9, 2020 3:57:48 AM
From Kate Chopin's "Madame Célestin's Divorce".
What does "the violet border" mean, please? A border that is made of violet flowers?


A noticeable change had come over lawyer Paxton. He discarded his work-day coat and began to wear his Sunday one to the office. He grew solicitous as to the shine of his boots, his collar, and the set of his tie. He brushed and trimmed his whiskers with a care that had not before been apparent. Then he fell into a stupid habit of dreaming as he walked the streets of the old town. It would be very good to take unto himself a wife, he dreamed. And he could dream of no other than pretty Madame Célestin filling that sweet and sacred office as she filled his thoughts, now. Old Natchitoches would not hold them comfortably, perhaps; but the world was surely wide enough to live in, outside of Natchitoches town.

His heart beat in a strangely irregular manner as he neared Madame Célestin's house one morning, and discovered her behind the rosebushes, as usual plying her broom. She had finished the gallery and steps and was sweeping the little brick walk along the edge of the violet border.

"Good-morning, Madame Célestin."

"Ah, it 's you, Judge? Good-morning." He waited. She seemed to be doing the same. Then she ventured, with some hesitancy, "You know, Judge, about that divo'ce. I been thinking, - I reckon you betta neva mine about that divo'ce." She was making deep rings in the palm of her gloved hand with the end of the broom-handle, and looking at them critically. Her face seemed to the lawyer to be unusually rosy; but maybe it was only the reflection of the pink bow at the throat. "Yes, I reckon you need n' mine. You see, Judge, Célestin came home las' night. An' he 's promise me on his word an' honor he 's going to turn ova a new leaf."
Topic: Comma after "information"?
Posted: Sunday, July 5, 2020 2:53:39 AM
Turnpike wrote:
Audiendus wrote:
Turnpike wrote:
So, "I have an idea" is wrong? Correct?

"I have an idea" is correct. 'Idea' is countable – you can have one, two or more ideas.

And you can also have one, two or more advices. But rules dictate the opposite. I know that.
To me, "advice" can be more than one. It is countable.
Topic: Comma after "information"?
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 5:03:29 AM
Audiendus wrote:
Turnpike wrote:
So, "I have an idea" is wrong? Correct?

"I have an idea" is correct. 'Idea' is countable – you can have one, two or more ideas.

And you can also have one, two or more advices. But rules dictates the opposite. I know that.
To me, "advice" can be more than one. It is countable.
Topic: Still nodding night
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 3:57:09 AM
thar wrote:
It is not really analysable as an action, you just have to put the words together.

If you don't know, 'to nod off' is to fall asleep.

Quote:
Verb Phrases. nod off, to fall asleep or doze, especially in a sitting position: He was reprimanded for nodding off in class.



Quote:
NOD OFF | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionarydictionary.cambridge.org › dictionary › nod-off
to begin sleeping, especially not intentionally: After our busy day, we both sat and nodded off in front of the TV.


My personal interpretation (from just that line)
the night was still (quiet) and sleepy

Thank you, Thar.
Topic: Still nodding night
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 2:57:44 AM
Hi all,
This is from a poem by Walt Whitman:

"Still nodding night." What does that mean?


“ ‘Night of south winds —night of the large few stars!
Still nodding night—’ ”
Topic: Comma after "information"?
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2020 1:17:31 AM
So, "I have an idea" is wrong? Correct?