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Profile: Tara2
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User Name: Tara2
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Female
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Joined: Wednesday, November 8, 2017
Last Visit: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 4:14:36 PM
Number of Posts: 2,716
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: tutor/toot
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 4:14:36 PM
thar wrote:
These are playing with words. They are not tbe normal words, just put together for fun.

To toot is to make a sound by blowing air (eg you toot your car horn). So it means he is teaching them to play the flute.

They are totally unrelated. Toot is onomatopoeic, it describes the sound.

Tutor
Old French tuteur (French tuteur), from Latin tutor (“a watcher, protector, guardian”),


Toot
(See the trumpet)



The repeated use of these unrelated words that contain the same consonant t and vowel sound oo make it a fun rhyme, but it is just a nonsense limerick. It just has multiple internal homophones, not just rhymes at the end of the lines.

Tutor
Toot
Flute
Two

Completely unrelated words.

A teacher who played the flute
Tried to teach two flute players to play the flute
The two flute players asked the teacher
"Is it harder to play the flute or to teach two flute players to play the flute!"

Nah, that is not a good poem.

But read your verse out loud, and just enjoy the fun of playing with the sounds. Angel

It is all just a build-up to produce that last line composed entirely of that one phoneme.
(Well, almost, because tutor is a "tyoo" sound.)

Woww, many, many thanks for the wonderful explanation.
Also for the nice picture, many thanks dear thar!!!!
Topic: tution/tutorial
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 4:12:08 PM
thar wrote:
Yes, it is actually acting as an adjective - the tuition fee. The fee for attending college.

Many thanks!!!
thar, in BE it's 'teachoing', so what's the difference between 'tutorial' and 'tuition', please?
This is a difficult issue Whistle WhistleAngel
Topic: tution/tutorial
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 4:10:25 PM
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
This is the definition of tuition as used in your sample sentence. "The students object to raising the tuition."
Easily looked up in TFD. As per the context provided by the sentence, the tuition is the cost to attend.

1. A fee for instruction, especially at a college, university, or private school.

Many thanks. Yes this AE. !!!!
Topic: tutor/toot
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 2:34:14 PM
Can you please explain the difference between 'tutor' and 'toot' and 'tuition'?

A tutor who tooted a flute
Tried to tutor two tooters to toot.
Said the two to the tutor,
"Is it harder to toot, or
To tutor two tooters to toot?"
Topic: tution/tutorial
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 1:03:11 PM
tautophile wrote:
A "tutorial" is a learning session--a class--held by a tutor for one or more of his or her students. "Tuition"--as in Tara's sentence "The students object to raising [not 'rising'] the tuition"--is short for "tuition fee", the fee paid to attend such a class. "Tuition" is a word for what a tutor provides--i.e., knowledge, understanding, etc.--to students in tutorials.

Many thanks dear taut!!!
'tutorial' is also for what a tutor provides, so what's the difference between 'tuition' and 'tutorial', please?
Topic: tution/tutorial
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 11:52:38 AM
What's the difference between 'tution' and 'tutorial'? Can we use them interchangeably in these two sentences?
Tutors are going to give more tutorials & lectures.
The students object ti rising the tution. (4000 Essential English words)
Topic: enforce/force
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 5:55:53 AM
thar wrote:
No.

You can force someone to do something.

You don't normally talk about forcing someone to obey the law, because the law comes with its own power.


You enforce the law - apply it to people and give them suitable punishment (as laid down by that law) if they break it.


In the UK you talk about the police. In the US you also talk about "law enforcement" and law enforcement officers - that includes all the various systems of police, sheriffs etc.
They are the people who enforce the law.


There are some laws that are on the books but are not enforced - ie they don't bother to caution or arrest people doing something that is technically against the law but is not considered important enough to bother with. That is a decision by the local police.

Force is a far stronger word, and usually negative - compel, give them no choice, drive them to do something that they don't want to do.

What a great difference you explained. Many, many thanks dear thar. You are really one!!!
Topic: enforce/force
Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 3:50:58 AM
Can we use 'force' here? What's the difference between 'force' and 'enforce'?

An authority is someone who has the power to make decisions and enforce rules and lows.
Topic: tutorial/lesson
Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 7:00:25 AM
thar wrote:
A session is a period of time spent doing something, normally with a coach or tutor. It is not like a 'school' lesson with a teacher at the front of the class (or online, nowadays!)

So you have a session of football training, a session with a masseur, a session with a tutor.


Outside of formal education the word tutorial is used to describe a lesson that is not interactive. Ie a 'how to' video could be a tutorial, because it teaches you something. That is a new use of the word, for things like online videos on how to unblock a drain or how to tie a reef knot. A specific skill. It will not be a 'a tutorial on Egyptian history' or any academic subject.






Excellent. Many thanks dear thar. You're one!!!!
Topic: watch over/watch
Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 5:40:39 AM
thar wrote:
Watch - look at, observe.
I watched TV.
I watched the match
I watched him walk down the road.


To watch over - to guard, protect, keep safe.


Someone is watching me - bad, they are a stalker!

Someone is watching over me - good, I have a guardian angel.

Many thanks dear thar for the wonderful explanations!!!!!