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Profile: onsen
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User Name: onsen
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Joined: Thursday, September 14, 2017
Last Visit: Sunday, February 25, 2018 1:04:00 AM
Number of Posts: 89
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: how to send a JPG file?
Posted: Friday, February 23, 2018 9:09:36 AM
Hello,

Please explain how to send a JPG file when posting a thread with it.

With best regards, onsen
Topic: the most ingenious person
Posted: Thursday, February 22, 2018 5:20:50 PM
Hello,

Only the most ingenious person would believe such a weak excuse.
(from Longman Dictionary of American English)

What is the relationship between 'only the most ingenious person' and 'a weak excuse'?
Why would only the most ingenious person believe such a weak excuse?
Is it related to 'Craft brings nothing home'?

Quote:
ingenious
adj.
1. Having great inventive skill and imagination: an ingenious negotiator.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition


Thank you
Topic: see more of you
Posted: Monday, February 19, 2018 7:54:32 PM
thar wrote:
People are aware it is an expression that can have a comical interpretation.



Thank you very much, thar

I managed to grasp the meaning of the phrase 'more of' in this case.
Topic: see more of you
Posted: Sunday, February 18, 2018 4:46:17 PM
Hello,

I hope we’ll see more of you (ie see you more often).
(from Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

How does the phrase 'see more of you' come to mean 'see you more often'?

Thank you
Topic: When I went to Naples, I thought it was an unsafe city.
Posted: Saturday, February 10, 2018 6:59:38 AM
Hello,

When I went to Naples, I thought it was an unsafe city.
(from Accuracy in English)

The book explains as follows.
The sentence is ambiguous. The verb 'thought' can be understood as having two meanings.
One: When I went to Naples, I felt it to be an unsafe city.
The other: When I went to Naples, I thought it would be an unsafe city.

Please explain the logic used by the author.

Thank you
Topic: besides
Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 11:52:49 PM
thar wrote:

If you have a cold, the fact it is raining is an additional reason not to go out.


Thank you very much.
Does an additional reason mean a weaker or less important reason or just what is added?
That is, isn't there anything connected with which reason is stronger or not with respect to 'I have a cold' and 'it is pouring down'?
Macmillan English Dictionary says 'besides' is used when you are adding another stronger reason …

Quote:

besides function word
2 used when you are adding another stronger reason to support what you are saying:
It’s too late to invite any more people. Besides, you know how Tim hates parties.
(from Macmillan English Dictionary)

Topic: besides
Posted: Wednesday, February 07, 2018 9:16:43 PM
Hello,

A. I cannot come out because I have a cold ― besides, it is pouring down.
(from Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary)

B. I cannot come out because it is pouring down ― besides, I have a cold.
('I have a cold' and 'it is pouring down' change places, and B is obtained.)

Is the use of 'besides' right in the sentence B?

Thank you
Topic: He is in his fifties.
Posted: Sunday, February 04, 2018 6:10:21 AM
Hello,

A: How old is he?
B: He is fifty-three years old.

The above conversation is an ordinary one.
But when B answers in such a way as the answer is: He is in his fifties., and from the beginning A doesn’t expect B to answer his exact age, i.e. fifty-three or fifty-four, etc., but expects B to answer in terms of such expressions as 'in one’s fifties, sixties, etc.', how does A ask B?

Thank you
Topic: Gold coins were brought up from below ...
Posted: Friday, January 26, 2018 9:41:44 PM
Hello,

Gold coins were brought up from below the hull of the sunken ship.
(from Accuracy in English)

The book explains as follows.
brought = verb
up = adverb
from = adverb
below = preposition

If the 'from' in the phrase is an adverb, which word does it modify and how is it said in other English words?
I suppose that it is not an adverb, but a preposition with 'below the hull of the sunken ship' being its object.

Thank you
Topic: think of sb/sth as/look on sb/sth as
Posted: Tuesday, January 09, 2018 11:53:13 PM
Hello,

Quote:

think of sb/sth as/look on sb/sth as
to think that someone or something is a particular kind of person or thing, especially when your opinion is wrong, unusual, or unfair: Most people think of Leonardo da Vinci as a great artist, but he was also a great scientist. | Learning a language should be thought of as a natural process. | Even doctors may look on these patients as drug addicts and treat them as social outcasts.
(from Longman Language Activator)


In what way is the part in blue related to the example sentences?

Thank you

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