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User Name: onsen
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COME IN NEW WORDS (continued 2014 edition)
Posted: Saturday, August 1, 2020 5:40:28 PM
fasten
Topic: He fell, cutting his forehead on the rough edge of a rock.
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 2:34:20 AM
The following quoted sentence is similar to the former sentence in structure.
That is, their structure is the past tense + present participle.

Quote:

to/till the ˈlast
until the last possible moment, especially until death:
He died protesting his innocence to the last.
to/till the ˈlast


In the above given sentence, 'protesting' comes first and then 'died' comes.
Topic: He fell, cutting his forehead on the rough edge of a rock.
Posted: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:11:56 AM
Hello,

Quote:
He fell, cutting his forehead on the rough edge of a rock.
(Longman Language Activator)


Which action took place first, 'fell' or 'cutting'?


Thank you.
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COME IN NEW WORDS (continued 2014 edition)
Posted: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 4:27:30 AM
poetry
Topic: other people's point of view vs. other people's points of view
Posted: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 2:26:54 AM
Hello,

Quote:

A. It is always interesting to hear other people's point of view.
interesting

B. You have to be willing to see (= understand) other people's points of view.
point of view


Sentence A uses the phrase 'other people's point of view' while sentence B uses the phrase 'other people's points of view'.

Q1.How does one use the above phrases properly?
Q2. How does one use the phrase 'other people's business' and the phrase 'other people's businesses' properly?


Thank you.
Topic: make dirty
Posted: Monday, July 27, 2020 9:15:18 AM
Hello,

Quote:
soil verb Don’t soil your hands with that filthy stuff.
contaminate, defile, dirty, make dirty, pollute, stain, tarnish
(The Oxford Study Thesaurus)


I made use of the italicized sentence and the phrase 'make dirty' in the above quote.
I composed the following sentence.

Don’t make your hands dirty with that filthy stuff.

Is the above sentence idiomatic?


Thank you.
Topic: come unstuck / be stuck
Posted: Sunday, July 26, 2020 3:49:43 AM
Hello,

Quote:

unstuck adj come unstuck
a) BrE informal if a person, plan, or system comes unstuck, they fail at what they were trying to achieve:
a dangerous area of rock where many climbers come unstuck
(LONGMAN Exams Dictionary)

Q1. What does the phrase 'fail at' mean?
Does the phrase 'fail in' work in the given definition?


Quote:

unstuck
3 if someone comes unstuck, they fall badly in something that they are trying to achieve; an informal use.
EG I always knew he’d come unstuck somewhere.
(Collins COBUILD English language dictionary)

Q2. What does the phrase 'fall badly in' mean?


Quote:

stuck adj
3 informal unable to do any more of something that you are working on because it is too difficult:
Can you help me with my homework, Dad? I’m stuck.
(LONGMAN Exams Dictionary)

Phrase A: come unstuck
Phrase B: be stuck (from the sentence 'I’m stuck.' in the above quote)

Q3. Why does Phrase A have the prefix 'un' (= not) in the phrase while Phrase B doesn’t have it though both phrases A and B have negative connotations?


Thank you.
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COME IN NEW WORDS (continued 2014 edition)
Posted: Wednesday, July 22, 2020 8:29:59 PM
already
Topic: ... is situated close to the Grand Canal on a street of terraced homes
Posted: Monday, July 20, 2020 6:52:52 AM
Hello,


Q1.
Quote:

A. This period three-bedroom residence is situated close to the Grand Canal on a street of terraced homes.
situate


Of the following 1~4 sentences, which one (s) is (or are) true?
1. This period three-bedroom residence is situated on a street of terraced homes.
2. This period three-bedroom residence is not situated on a street of terraced homes.
3. It’s not certain from the sentence A whether or not this period three-bedroom residence is situated on a street of terraced homes.
4. The Grand Canal is situated on a street of terraced homes.


Q2.
Quote:

B. This house is situated next to a renovated church on a quiet road close to the city centre.
situate


Of the following 5~8 sentences, which one (s) is (or are) true?
5. A renovated church is situated on a quiet road.
6. A quiet road is situated close to the city centre.
7. It’s not certain from the sentence B whether or not this house is situated on a quiet road.
8. It’s not certain from the sentence B whether or not this house is situated close to the city centre.


Thank you.
Topic: catch somebody/something ... / catch somebody a blow ...
Posted: Sunday, July 19, 2020 5:49:35 AM
Hello,

A. The stone caught him on the side of the head.

B. She caught him a blow on the chin.

(from the following quote)


Quote:

catch verb
15 ★[transitive] to hit somebody/something
catch somebody/something + adv./prep.
The stone caught him on the side of the head.
catch somebody a blow + adv./prep.
She caught him a blow on the chin.
catch


Q1.
About sentence A.
I added the phrase 'a blow' between the 'him' and 'on'. Is the following sentence C correct or not?

C. The stone caught him a blow on the side of the head.


Q2.
About sentence B.
I took the phrase 'a blow' from B. Is the following sentence D correct or not?

D. She caught him on the chin.


Q3.
Why is the phrase 'a blow' in B necessary?


Thank you.