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Joined: Thursday, September 14, 2017
Last Visit: Sunday, September 22, 2019 6:20:06 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: some food vs. some foods
Posted: Sunday, September 22, 2019 3:38:42 AM
Hello,

Quote:
Stay here and watch my bags while I go and buy some food.
(Longman Language Activator)

Does the phrase 'some food' mean either a single item of food or plural items of food, depending on context?



Quote:
Some foods take longer to digest.
(Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

Does the phrase 'some foods' always mean plural items of food?



Thank you.
Topic: to turn clothes very fast in a machine to remove water from them
Posted: Saturday, September 21, 2019 1:18:13 AM
Hello,

Quote:

spin n
7 WET CLOTHES give something a spin BrE to turn clothes very fast in a machine to remove water from them
(LONGMAN Exams Dictionary)


The noun 'water' in the definition doesn’t take an article.
Is it because some amount of water may still remain not removed?


Is the following definition by adding 'the' to the noun 'water' wrong?

to turn clothes very fast in a machine to remove the water from them


Thank you
Topic: but I don’t think I’d be much good at it
Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2019 9:57:53 AM
Hello,

Quote:
A. Perhaps I’d like to design cars, but I don’t think I’d be much good at it.
Jonathan Ive


Q1.
Is the original sentence supposed to have omitted the following if clause?

'if I tried to design cars'

i.e. but I don’t think I’d be much good at it if I tried to design cars


Q2.
I changed 'I don’t think I’d be much good at it' to 'I think I wouldn’t be much good at it' and made the sentence B.

B
. Perhaps I’d like to design cars, but I think I wouldn’t be much good at it.

Do A and B mean the same?
I suppose they mean the same.


Thank you.
Topic: Corbin apologized for his outburst at the meeting.
Posted: Monday, September 16, 2019 7:31:56 PM
Hello,

Quote:
Corbin apologized for his outburst at the meeting.
(Longman Language Activator)


Does the sentence have two meanings as follows?

1. His apology was made at the meeting.
2. His outburst was caused at the meeting.


Thank you.

edited:
for added
Topic: what is
Posted: Sunday, September 15, 2019 7:23:57 AM
thar wrote:
What is.
What exists
What is real.
What is true.


Knowledge is knowing about stuff that exists around us - facts and explanations. Seeking truth.
It answers the questions 'what?' and 'how?'.


The Greeks were big on induction and theory, not so much for experiment. Whistle



Thank you very much, thar, for your explanation.

Can one understand 'what is' and 'what is not' as follows if one thought of the idea 'what is not'?
This question may stray from what is being discussed in the original context, though.


what is …………………………the real world
what is not……………………imaginary worlds
Topic: what is
Posted: Sunday, September 15, 2019 2:12:58 AM
Hello,

Quote:
SOCRATES: Now, doesn’t knowledge naturally deal with what is, to know how what is is? But first I think we had better go through the following.
GLOUCON: What?
SOCRATES: We think powers are a type of thing that enables us - or anything else that has an ability - to do whatever we are able to do. Sight and hearing are examples of what I mean by powers, if you understand the kind of thing I am trying to describe.
GLOUCON: Yes, I do.
(Republic 5, Introductory Readings in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy, Edited by C. D. C. Reeve and Patrick Lee Miller)


What does the underlined clause 'what is' mean?


Thank you.
Topic: get stuffed!
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 1:00:05 AM
Thank you very much for the discussion so far.


The dictionary gives the following sentence with the phrase 'get stuffed' in it.

Quote:
The headmaster can go and get stuffed.
(Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary)


Each phrase is clear. But, the whole sentence isn’t clear. What does it mean?
Topic: get stuffed!
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 9:23:07 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:

I have always thought of the stuffed in "get stuffed" as a polite way of refering to the act of sexual intercourse, "get stuffed" is an equivalent of "f**k off".
You can argue that it is a reference to one thing being filled with another I guess.


Thank you very much, Sarrriesfan, for your reply.

How is <"get stuffed" is an equivalent of "f**k off".> related to 'an exclamation of contemptuous anger or annoyance, esp against another person'?
Topic: get stuffed!
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:09:17 AM
Hello,

Quote:

stuffed (stʌft)
adj
1. (Cookery) filled with something, esp (of poultry and other food) filled with stuffing
2. (Physiology) (foll by up) (of the nasal passages) blocked with mucus
3. get stuffed! slang Brit an exclamation of contemptuous anger or annoyance, esp against another person
TFD


How does one reach 3. starting from 1. and 2. in meaning?
Or do 1. and 2. have nothing to do with 3.?


Thank you.
Topic: didn’t touch / hasn’t touched
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 1:25:24 AM
Hello,

Quote:
He put away the book he was writing and didn’t touch it again for years.
(Longman Dictionary of American English)


Is the following sentence correct or not?

He put away the book he was writing and hasn’t touched it again for years.


Thank you.

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