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Profile: maltliquor87
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User Name maltliquor87
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Last Visit: Tuesday, August 4, 2020 12:41:21 PM
Number of Posts: 269
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: "born missing +some body part"
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2020 12:28:11 AM
No big deal. The answers I've received are good.

I'll stick with "born missing". That's what I've heard used. I was wondering if the version with "without" was possible. Before Romany answered my question I also thought that "without one paw" could be misconstrued as "having no paws at all" although I myself cannot justify this interpretation.

The version with "missing" appears to be "safer" for me given the fact that sometimes people do misinterpret what is being said. The second version is ok but not that foolproof
Topic: "born missing +some body part"
Posted: Thursday, February 6, 2020 6:59:18 AM
Thank you, Romany!
Topic: "born missing +some body part"
Posted: Wednesday, February 5, 2020 11:34:54 PM
Hello, dear forum members.

Do both sentences below sound ok and mean the same thing?

1)The puppy was born missing a paw.
2)The puppy was born without one paw



Topic: "The fog is going away"
Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 3:38:43 PM
Thank you!
Topic: "The fog is going away"
Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 3:25:03 PM
Hello!

Could you please tell me whether all of the sentences below sound natural?

1) The fog is going away.
2) The fog is clearing.
3) The fog is lifting.
Topic: Do these answers sound natural?
Posted: Saturday, December 28, 2019 7:32:04 AM
Thanks thar. I always appreciate your help.

Yes, I do realize that "have something done by someone" is not to be confused with "to possess something".
I guess that's why "I have two watches repaired by him" may not sound ok. We're talking about possession here, but the structure looks similar to the "have something done" form. On the other hand, Sureshot did not raise any objection to it. Could it be that it sounds ok in American English, but seems unnatural in British English? Just spitballing here.
Topic: Do these answers sound natural?
Posted: Saturday, December 28, 2019 5:59:49 AM
Thank you, Romany.

It would seem that "I have two watches which were repaired by him" could be transformed into this shorter sentence "I have two watches repaired by him".
Topic: Do these answers sound natural?
Posted: Saturday, December 28, 2019 2:12:24 AM
Thank you!

Interesting. I would think that "had my two watches repaired" also means an arrangement where you had something done for you by another person, like the one conveyed by the structure "got my two watches repaired". What if the following sentences are used in the second answer?

Quote:
I had him repair my two watches a few years ago. They've been working perfectly ever since.


Does it also imply that I no longer possess those watches?

Topic: Do these answers sound natural?
Posted: Saturday, December 28, 2019 12:56:20 AM
Hello!

Do the following answers sound natural? I'm especially interested in the parts in italics. All these examples are mine.

1) - Is this watchmaker any good? Have you ever had him repair your watch?
- He knows his onions. I have two watches repaired by him. They work perfectly.

2) - Is this watchmaker any good? Have you ever had him repair your watch?
- He knows his onions. I had my two watches repaired by him a few years ago. They've been working perfectly ever since.

I'd be glad to read your comments on that.

Topic: Still waters run deep
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 11:00:46 PM
Thanks for your comments.