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Profile: D00M
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User Name: D00M
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Friday, March 24, 2017
Last Visit: Thursday, July 19, 2018 12:10:35 PM
Number of Posts: 1,249
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: part of SpeecH
Posted: Thursday, July 19, 2018 10:14:55 AM
Thank you all,

How if it's in present tense? Does it allow any room for a "passive" interpretation?


Passive: Is the underlined sentence correctly punctuated (by David)?

Active: Does David punctuate the underlined sentence correctly?



I think the above doesn't make sense since it is using present tense to ask about an action which has already been done.





I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: stare in
Posted: Thursday, July 19, 2018 10:09:17 AM
Hello respected teachers,

It suddenly appeared on the path a little ahead of me, staring in my direction and sniffing the air. An enormous grizzly bear was checking me out.

What does the red part mean in the above? Should it not be "stare at my direction"?

I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: Make
Posted: Thursday, July 19, 2018 8:30:51 AM
Hello respected teachers,
Are both the following correct?

There are lots of features which make an ideal neighbour.

There are lots of features which make for an ideal neighbour.

I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: part of SpeecH
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:39:22 PM
Thank you, NKM.

How should one realize when a participle is adjectival and when making a passive voice?

For example:

Was the underlined sentenced correctly punctuated?

Was the underlined sentence correctly punctuated (by David)?


I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: exchange
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:35:25 PM
Thank you ever so much, DS.

I appreciate your thorough explanation and effort. You never leave any point untouched when answering questions, awesome.

I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: part of SpeecH
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 5:15:22 PM
Hello respected teachers,

Is the underlined word an adjective in the following sentence?

Is the underlined sentenced correctly punctuated?

I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: Punctuation
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 5:14:02 PM
Hello respected teachers,

An isolated individual does not exist. He who is sad,saddens others.
(Antonie de Saint-Exupery)

Is the underlined sentenced correctly punctuated?




I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: causative
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 3:05:24 PM
Hello respected teachers,

He had his brother wash his car.
He had his brother washing his car.


Are both the above correct?

I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: Natural English-Paragraph
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 2:44:25 PM
Romany wrote:


Doom - as Drago said (he's so much more diplomatic than I am!) this simply isn't the kind of missive that a speaker of English would find 'natural'.

The very first sentence ("Please read this letter carefully and take it seriously") would have the ordinary English speaker (tho, not perhaps an AE speaker?) chucking the letter in the bin. It sounds like a ransom note or a terrorist threat! We simply don't give orders to people. ( However, some AE speakers don't understand this in the same way we do. That's why I said that perhaps certain AE speakers might not chuck it straight in the bin.)

Drago has tip-toed in his very gentle way around it by his hyphenated 'feels like', and 'strange'. But, more bluntly, there is nothing at all "natural" about this letter - to most native English speakers. Not just because of the way the language in it is used; but because the whole procedure and way of going about the complaint procedure doesn't fit culturally into our language.

This sounds like a direct translation from another language/culture. Thus no, I don't think it sounds like "natural" English.

(Do you understand what I mean here? Am I making senseThink ?)



It does make sense and I see eye to eye with you about it. This is actually a translation work I have done for somebody, and I did warned the owner of the text about the cultural differences. But they didn't want it to be changed in any manner. Yet, I tried to make it as native as possible to reduce the harshness of its tone. What would you do in such situation, Romany, when translating a text?

I am looking forward to your answers.
Topic: NaTuRal EnglIsH
Posted: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 12:50:54 PM
Hello respected teachers,


Is the following natural, please?

The instructor has occasionally returned our compositions the next day.

I am looking forward to your answers.

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