The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: Joel Souza
About
User Name: Joel Souza
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation:
Interests:
Gender: None Specified
Home Page
Statistics
Joined: Wednesday, March 1, 2017
Last Visit: Friday, May 25, 2018 3:49:55 PM
Number of Posts: 229
[0.03% of all post / 0.51 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: dissension
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2018 3:49:55 PM
The sparks of dissension soon kindled into a blaze; and the colonies, or rather, as they quickly declared themselves, the States, became a scene of strife and bloodshed for years.
Topic: National Maritime Day
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 5:01:41 PM
National Maritime Day
It was President Franklin D. Roosevelt who first proclaimed May 22 as National Maritime Day in 1933. Since that time, observations of this day have grown in popularity, particularly in American port cities. Ships are opened to the public, maritime art and essay contests are held, and parades and band concerts are common. Environmentalists sometimes take advantage of the attention focused on the country's maritime heritage on this day to draw attention to pollution and deterioration of maritime environments, particularly in large commercial ports like New York City
Topic: incumbency
Posted: Friday, May 11, 2018 4:45:31 PM
Word of the Day
incumbency
Definition: (noun) The term during which some position is held.
Synonyms: tenure, term of office
Usage: During his incumbency, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt instituted the New Deal to counter the Great Depression.
Topic: Birthday of Tagore
Posted: Monday, May 7, 2018 3:03:26 PM
Birthday of Tagore
This date commemorates the birth of Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), the great poet, philosopher, social reformer, dramatist, and musician of Calcutta, India. In 1913, he was the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for literature. Tagore's birthday is celebrated with a festival of his poetry, plays, music, and dance dramas. There are discussions at schools and universities of his ideas on education and philosophy, and screenings of films based on Tagore's short stories and novels made by filmmaker and Calcutta native, Satyajit Ray.
Topic: Omitting Relative Pronouns
Posted: Friday, April 27, 2018 5:44:30 PM
Omitting relative pronouns
Sometimes, especially in informal writing, relative pronouns can be omitted altogether. This can only be done when the relative pronoun is the object of a restrictive relative clause.
For example, if a relative pronoun is the object of a clause, there are several ways you can phrase the sentence, depending on how formal or informal you want it to sound:
“The girl to whom I gave my ice cream looked up and smiled at me.” (very formal)
“The girl whom I gave my ice cream to looked up and smiled at me.” (formal)
“The girl who I gave my ice cream to looked up and smiled at me.” (casual)
“The girl that I gave my ice cream to looked up and smiled at me.” (very casual)
“The girl I gave my ice cream to looked up and smiled at me.” (most casual)
Unlike whom, which can only act as an object of a relative clause, who and that can function as both objects and subjects when describing people; therefore, in relative clauses, it is acceptable to replace the rather formal-sounding whom with either who or that, or omit the relative pronoun altogether.
When describing things instead of people, the relative pronouns that and which may be omitted as long as they are used, like whom, as an object of a restrictive relative clause:
“The house that I want to buy is going on sale today.”
“The house which I want to buy is going on sale today.”
“The house I want to buy is going on sale today.”
Similarly, if a relative clause uses an auxiliary verb (such as to be) + a present participle after the relative pronoun, it can be worded like this:
“The girl who is jumping into the lake is a world-famous diver.”
“The girl that is jumping into the lake is a world-famous diver.”
“The girl jumping into the lake is a world-famous diver.”
Topic: frequency
Posted: Thursday, April 26, 2018 8:01:44 AM
Definition: (noun) The number of occurrences within a given time period.
Synonyms: oftenness
Usage: The frequency of his seizures increased as he grew older.
Topic: Blindfold Chess
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 4:09:10 PM
Blindfold Chess
In blindfold chess, players engage in a chess match without being able to see or touch the pieces. Moves are communicated via chess notation, a system which describes the pieces' location on the board. While it is generally thought that most strong players can play at least one game blindfolded, some masters are able to play dozens of blindfolded games simultaneously with different opponents. What is the world record for the number of blindfold chess games played simultaneously by one person?
Topic: Administrative Professionals Week
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 4:07:27 PM
mouth-watering
Delicious; particularly appetizing in appearance, aroma, or description, especially as makes one's mouth salivate. I can't wait to eat—those steaks you're cooking smell mouth-watering! We've got a few new mouth-watering dishes featured on the menu that are sure to bring in more customers!
Topic: Using Brackets for Clarification
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:54:51 PM
Using brackets for clarification
The most common use of brackets is to enclose information that clarifies or explains an ambiguous element in a quoted sentence. For example:
“She [the governor] insisted that the restructured budget would not result in funding shortfalls for schools.”
We can also use brackets to replace a word so the quotation fits with the natural flow of the sentence, such as by changing a capital letter to a lowercase (or vice versa), using the correct pronoun to fit the sentence’s grammatical person, or creating the correct subject-verb agreement. For instance:
Original sentence: “I have always been sure to file my taxes on time.”
As a quotation: The senator said he “[has] always been sure to file [his] taxes on time.”
Original sentence: “The U.N. will ultimately have oversight over reunification.”
As a quotation: The acting president has confirmed that “[t]he U.N. will ultimately have oversight over reunification.”
Original sentence: “Yesterday, December 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy—the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.”
As a quotation: “[A] date which will live in infamy,” as then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt famously called it, the bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan on December 7, 1941, acted as a catalyst that propelled America into the Second Word War.
Remember: Do not use parentheses instead of brackets when making changes to quoted material. Using parentheses implies that the information is an original part of the quotation, rather than a change or addition made by the person using the quote.
“They (the CEOs of the two major corporations) have agreed on a time frame for the historic merger.” (incorrect)
“They [the CEOs of the two major corporations] have agreed on a time frame for the historic merger.” (correct)
Topic: Using Superlative Adverbs
Posted: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 4:46:11 PM
Using Superlative Adverbs
We usually use superlative adverbs when describing an action of someone or something among a group of several others, either in a collective group or among several individuals.
Superlative adverbs come after the verb in a sentence, and they are almost always preceded by the word the. For example:
“Cars and motorcycles can go fast, but an airplane moves the fastest.”
“I eat the most neatly among my siblings.”
“She works the least carefully in her class.”
Omitting the group of comparison
When we use superlatives, it is very common to omit the group that something or someone is being compared to because that group is implied by a previous sentence. For example:
“My brothers are all fast swimmers. John swims the fastest, though.”
We can also identify a superlative attribute of a subject’s action compared to itself in other contexts or points in time. In this case, we do not have another group to identify, and we generally do not use the word the. For example:
“I work best by myself.” (compared to when other people are involved)
“The engine runs most smoothly after it has warmed up for a while.” (compared to when the engine is cold)
“Flowers bloom most beautifully in the spring.” (compared to the other seasons)

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.