The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: George Weischadle
About
User Name: George Weischadle
Forum Rank: Member
Gender: None Specified
Statistics
Joined: Friday, January 27, 2017
Last Visit: Monday, August 7, 2017 2:33:03 PM
Number of Posts: 45
[0.00% of all post / 0.04 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: A sneeze/sneezing cracker
Posted: Monday, August 7, 2017 2:30:38 PM
Joe Kim wrote:
1. A sneeze cracker.

What would this mean?
A. The cracker can make you sneeze ---- is this it?



2. A sneezing cracker.
What does this mean?
B. A cracker that is sneezing.
Can this also mean,
C. The cracker that make you sneeze?


Please provide the CONTEXT in which that was given.
Topic: a Japanese
Posted: Sunday, August 6, 2017 2:13:27 PM
Koh Elaine wrote:
Why is it wrong to call someone who is Japanese a Japanse, but it is OK to say an American or a Swede?

Thanks.
It isn't wrong. Problem is, in today's politically-correct society people sometimes imagine insults where none were intended.
Topic: A shake and shaking
Posted: Friday, August 4, 2017 2:58:09 PM
sureshot wrote:
Joe Kim wrote:
Hold my shoulders and shake me a little violently.

1. Give me a shake.
2. Give me shaking.

Is the number 2 also correct to say at some point?

_________________

Give me what? The response is a noun. "Shake" is a noun and has been correctly preceded by an article. Sentence 1 is correct. Sentence 2 has tried to use a gerund. Its use is incorrect in the given sentence. Even if a gerund is used, it would still need the article "a/an" before it.

At some point? Is there a particular point you're asking about?
Topic: A shake and shaking
Posted: Friday, August 4, 2017 1:43:45 PM
sureshot wrote:
Joe Kim wrote:
Hold my shoulders and shake me a little violently.

1. Give me a shake.
2. Give me shaking.

Is the number 2 also correct to say at some point?

_________________

Give me what? The response is a noun. "Shake" is a noun and has been correctly preceded by an article. Sentence 1 is correct. Sentence 2 has tried to use a gerund. Its use is incorrect in the given sentence. Even if a gerund is used, it would still need the article "a/an" before it.

As you wrote in your question, "shake me" is correct and equivalent to "give me a shake." Number 2 is not correct as sureshot posted.
Topic: The exam is marked out of 50.
Posted: Wednesday, August 2, 2017 5:13:54 PM
sb70012 wrote:
The exam is marked out of 50.

Hi,
The sentence above is British. How can I say the sentence above in American English?

Thank you.

We Yanks can guess what that means, but to me it sounds awkward.
We would say "on a scale of 50" rather than "marked out of 50."
Topic: Outside out, fold
Posted: Wednesday, August 2, 2017 1:03:35 PM
Joe Kim wrote:
You've got a file of lundry and now fold them nicely. Some are inside out. How would give an instruction to a person for this state of garment to fold?

1. First, flip so the outside is in, then fold.
2. Outside out, fold.
3. Inside in, fold.


1. Are you sure you want fold a garment with its outside on the inside? And I think "flip" is not the correct word for this.
2. and 3. Your choice - they are equivalent.
Topic: What can I call a person who is going to take a test?
Posted: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 1:04:44 PM
Romany wrote:

Indeed they do! I've been invigilating my bottom off this weekend, and will have to also invigilate our next Art Exhibition.

The mind boggles ... Anxious
Topic: What can I call a person who is going to take a test?
Posted: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 1:02:41 PM
Romany wrote:

Indeed they do! I've been invigilating my bottom off this weekend, and will have to also invigilate our next Art Exhibition.

The mind boggles ... Anxious
Topic: as many as
Posted: Monday, July 31, 2017 3:37:47 PM
I suggest a minor change for clarity: Turkey was the least popular among the five, visited by only about 30% as many British as was France (or "as France was".)
Topic: please check the sentence for mistake
Posted: Saturday, July 29, 2017 3:44:36 PM
s21d wrote:
"The area of framing questions from is huge."

Kindly tell me if the above written statement is correct if I want to mean that the portion from which questions will be asked is vast.


Hmmm - maybe "The questions will cover a wide area."