The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Profile: yummyspringroll
About
User Name: yummyspringroll
Forum Rank: Member
Gender: None Specified
Statistics
Joined: Sunday, September 25, 2016
Last Visit: Sunday, May 24, 2020 11:04:49 PM
Number of Posts: 60
[0.01% of all post / 0.04 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Two young women would die while I was out there. - Bill Bryson
Posted: Thursday, May 21, 2020 4:50:19 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I guess thar's in bed.

What I would say in the last chapter of the book is "Two young women died while I was out there."

He may have a different version.


Thank you, Drag0nspeaker! I think I get it now :D
Topic: Two young women would die while I was out there. - Bill Bryson
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 11:09:33 PM
thar wrote:
It is not just about what happened - they died
it is about the pattern being common, almost expected.
Nine hikers died in the given period.
Two more would die in the period I was there - that is just a continuation of the same pattern. It shows the level of danger, and that it was not just historical, it was still a present danger.


Looking forward, as if you can predict what is going to happen:

two young women will die while I am here


But this is the past. It did happen.
two young women would die while I was there

It proves that is was dangerous at the time he was there, that those nine deaths were not just something that happened in the past.




Thank you very much, thar!

Suppose this fact was written not in the first chapter (where he hadn't begun the hike) but in the last chapter where the author was finally home and his family filled him in on everything that happened while he was away, and that's when he learned about the two women. Will the sentence be the same?
Topic: Two young women would die while I was out there. - Bill Bryson
Posted: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 5:44:42 AM
Here's an excerpt from the first chapter of a book by Bill Bryson titled A Walk In The Woods. The author tells how one day he got the idea of hiking the Appalachian Trail and then followed through with it. The first chapter is about him considering the risks of the journey.

Quote:
Finally, this being America, there is the constant possibility of murder. At least nine hikers — the actual number depends on which source you consult and how you define a hiker — have been murdered along the trail since 1974. Two young women would die while I was out there.


Two young women would die while I was out there.
What does this sentence mean?
a. Is this only a "what-if" thought that crossed the author's mind while he was considering the risk?
b. Or is this something that actually happened and the author learned about it after he had finished the journey and so he included this fact in his book?
c. If the answer is b., could someone please explain the grammar here? Why did he use "would die" instead of "died"?

Thank you!
Topic: attendance, oil, homnibus
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 10:19:57 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

Way back - last century when I was a teenager (or maybe in my early 20s), Britain changed currency from "twelve pence is a shilling; and twenty shillings is a pound" (£, s, d) to "one hundred new pence is a pound" (£, P).
So now we just say 'pounds' and 'pence'. and usually just write the pounds as a sort of decimal.
£11.99, £22.50, "£0.45" OR "45P" (eleven pound ninety-nine, twenty-two pound fifty, forty-five Pee).

I think Taurine is referring to the bad good old days when everyone who mattered had servants and slaves.
The proletariat (the 90% who were servants and slaves, not masters) insisted on some rights.
This is, of course, equivalent to the Communist Revolution in Russia.


got it, thank you Drag0nspeaker! I'm reading about Russian revolution now :D
Topic: attendance, oil, homnibus
Posted: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 6:35:56 AM
Thank you everyone for your answers, they really help!

georgew
Quote:
And you thought the US budget was complicated??!!

Haha, I never think of the US budget because I'm not even American.
Anyway, the website you linked is about old money. Does that mean the British no longer use s. and d. when writing down amounts of money?


Sarrriesfan
thanks for the movie reference! never watched classic movies before but it seems cute, hehe!


taurine
Quote:
It was used before proletariat took over the power claiming social justice ideals and murdering millions of people around the world, like never before people in such a large number.

Is this a historical reference? which particular event are you referring? I'm not very good at world history but I'm intrigued to know more :D
Topic: attendance, oil, homnibus
Posted: Saturday, May 9, 2020 10:11:18 PM
Here is an excerpt from a short story by H.G. Wells titled The Listener.

Quote:

Oct. 8.—My week’s book is nicely kept, and so far is reasonable. Milk and sugar 7d., bread 6d., butter 8d., marmalade 6d., eggs 1s. 8d., laundress 2s. 9d., oil 6d., attendance 5s.; total 12s. 2d.

The landlady has a son who, she told me, is “somethink on a homnibus”. He comes occasionally to see her. I think he drinks, for he talks very loud, regardless of the hour of the day or night, and tumbles about over the furniture downstairs


1. What are s. and d.?
2. What does attendance here mean?
3. What oil is referred to here? cooking oil? kerosene? Why is it so significant that it has to be included in his list of spending? (was it a common everyday need at that period of time?)
4. What is homnibus here? (I'm guessing it's an intentional misspelling) Why does the lady say his son is "somethink on a homnibus"? What does that mean?

Thank you~!
Topic: are the tenses correct in this sentence?
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2020 9:14:38 AM
FounDit wrote:
Wow. I'm amazed you found your way back to this after nearly three years. You've been thinking about this a long time...(I'm joking)

It could, but your time frame shifts too much in this paragraph, and that makes it awkward. It appears that you want to tell the story from the point of view (p.o.v., or pov)of the second job, which is now in the past. So you have three different perspectives. Telling the story now, today, your perspective on the second job, and your experience on the first job.

Since your perspective is the pov from the second job, you have to keep that pov and tense.

Also, notice I did a strike through on the word "too". This use implies you are agreeing with someone as having the same experience. If that's not true, it should be omitted, but if it is true, then I think using "also", as I did, works better.


Years ago, I'd also been in a work situation where everyone seemed to treat me too kindly too, and it felt as if they were expecting something from me in return (whether it was true or not, I will never know). It was suffocating and it went on for more than a year. I was totally frustrated. But years later, when another job put me in a situation where people treated me like dirt, and I looked back at the former situation, it seemed like a blessing that I had taken for granted. And I was ashamed of myself for being unable to equally (moved here) return people’s kindness to me at that time.

Another thing, this sentence: (whether it was true or not, I never know), I meant it to imply that I didn't knew back then and I still don't know now and I don't think I will ever know in the future.
So is the sentence correct? Or should it be: (whether it was true or not, I never knew or I'll never know)

Using "I never knew" restricts it to that time frame. Using "I'll never know" covers all time, both the past and future.[/quote]


Why, thank you sooooo much for the explanation, FounDit! It really helps~! Pray
Well, you're right, I'm still thinking about it. Years of learning English and I still can't wrap my head around Tenses. Brick wall My mother tongue has no tenses and everyone understand each other perfectly without needing to change any verb, to-be, etc. every time. It's an otherworldly concept to me. Plus I'm a very slow learner :(
Topic: are the tenses correct in this sentence?
Posted: Saturday, April 11, 2020 8:42:47 PM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Yes - I can see why (grammatically) it would seem correct to use a string of past perfect clauses. However, that sentence sounds very awkward.

Just the day before when I had been taking out my trash as I had left for work I had run into her about to leave as well and she had offered me a ride.

You could omit a verb or two - you actually have five major verbs in one sentence with no punctuation, which is not a good idea normally.

Just the day before, when I had been taking out my trash on my way to work, I had run into her leaving as well and she had offered me a ride.


I agree that the time-adverbial clause (which I surrounded by commas) can be used to "set the tense" for the whole sentence.

Just the day before, when I had been taking out my trash on my way to work, I ran into her leaving as well and she offered me a ride.



Thanks for the explanation, it really helps.

Instead of a time-adverbial clause, can a main clause "set the tense"? Please consider this passage below. What do you think? Is it also awkward?

Now, I’d been in a work situation where everyone seemed to treat me too kindly too, and it felt as if they were expecting something from me in return (whether it was true or not, I never know). It was suffocating and it went on for more than a year. I was totally frustrated. But years later, another job put me in a situation where people treated me like dirt and when I looked back, the former situation now seemed like a blessing that I had taken for granted. And I’m ashamed of myself who hadn’t been able to return people’s kindness to me equally that time.

Another thing, this sentence: (whether it was true or not, I never know), I meant it to imply that I didn't knew back then and I still don't know now and I don't think I will ever know in the future.
So is the sentence correct? Or should it be: (whether it was true or not, I never knew or I'll never know)
Topic: Question about some sentences in Pride and Prejudice
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 10:44:55 PM
Please help me understand these sentences from Pride and Prejudice


Darcy's letter:

Quote:
That I was desirous of believing her indifferent is certain—but I will venture to say that my investigation and decisions are not usually influenced by my hopes or fears. I did not believe her to be indifferent because I wished it; I believed it on impartial conviction, as truly as I wished it in reason.


So Darcy wishes Jane to be indifferent, and he also believes that she is, based on his unbiased observation. Am I correct? Now, what does the last part mean (as truly as I wished it in reason)?

Darcy's letter:

Quote:
Here again shall give you pain—to what degree you only can tell. But whatever may be the sentiments which Mr. Wickham has created, a suspicion of their nature shall not prevent me from unfolding his real character—it adds even another motive.


Does this mean Darcy suspects Wickham has made Elizabeth in love with him, and therefore exposing Wichkam will pain Elizabeth?

Chapter 36:

Quote:
If Elizabeth, when Mr. Darcy gave her the letter, did not expect it to contain a renewal of his offers, she had formed no expectation at all of its contents. But such as they were, it may well be supposed how eagerly she went through them, and what a contrariety of emotion they excited.


Does this means that Elizabeth expects the letter to contain none other than a renewal of Darcy's proposal? And therefore she eagerly goes through the letter to find this renewal, which would prove her expectation right?

Thank you Angel
Topic: People now, they hit the pitch we throw.
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2018 2:01:57 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
I think it is an analogy that refers to the (mostly) American sport of baseball, a pitch is the ball that the pitcher on the mound in the middle throws.

He can choose to throw a variety of types of ball a slow one, a fast one etc. the opposition players with a bat must adjust their swing to compensate.

The people will change their mindset to match whatever the insurance companies try to do.


Thank you, Sarrriesfan ~~

By the way, I like your unwitty signature :D