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Profile: Joe Kim
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User Name: Joe Kim
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Friday, September 16, 2016
Last Visit: Monday, October 19, 2020 7:34:03 PM
Number of Posts: 725
[0.07% of all post / 0.48 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Incoming
Posted: Sunday, October 11, 2020 3:16:58 AM
1. You've got incoming

2. You've got an incoming.

3. You've got incomings.

What do incoming, an incoming and incomings mean to you? (If the sentence doesn't fit, it is because I don't know well their meanings to make sense)
Topic: Gerund or to verb
Posted: Sunday, October 11, 2020 3:02:00 AM
1. Our priority is getting them out.

2. Our priority is to get them out.

Which one is more natural?
Topic: Ain't no mama like ...
Posted: Sunday, October 11, 2020 3:00:29 AM
My question isn't about the use of there. It is the omission of subject.

Topic: A drink-milk time
Posted: Saturday, October 10, 2020 8:45:08 PM
Thank you.
Topic: Ain't no mama like ...
Posted: Saturday, October 10, 2020 8:42:42 PM
Thanks.

Are you saying there because only "there" could make sense? What is the possibility of he, she, or it?

I thought since a baby wears the shirt with the phrase on it, it was "i" that is omitted.
Topic: Ain't no mama like ...
Posted: Saturday, October 10, 2020 12:18:35 AM
Ain't no mama like one I got -- what does this mean on a baby shirt?

Should I read "I ain't or there aren't?
Topic: A drink-milk time
Posted: Friday, October 9, 2020 6:14:08 PM
Audiendus wrote:

I don't like his arrogant, preaching-the-gospel attitude.

In such longer participle phrases, the words retain their normal order, so the object (if there is one) comes after the participle. So we can say either "a gospel-preaching attitude" (two-word hyphenation) or, less commonly, "a preaching-the-gospel attitude" (longer phrase hyphenation). But not "a preaching-gospel attitude".


Thank you.

So the verb+object form can stay unswitched even if informal.

In that case, if the original sentence was "it's drinking-the-milk time", would you think it is possible? (I don't think "the" is matter here though)
If "the" is not the case, why a preaching the gospel attitude is ok, but not milk?
Topic: A drink-milk time
Posted: Friday, October 9, 2020 12:54:39 AM
So, a milk drinking time.

I am kind of confused about the order of the describing part for a noun following. As in my post " a pop-coming-out-of-bottle sound " some phrases can go in front of a noun without switching, but some get switched as in the case of "milk drinking time".

Is there any phrase of which describing phrase structure is unswitched?


Topic: A drink-milk time
Posted: Friday, October 9, 2020 12:30:44 AM
Thank you everyone.



Topic: A drink-milk time
Posted: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 11:55:45 PM
No one use this expression. However, even if awkward, which form is grammatical and communicable?

1. It's a drink-milk time.
2. It's a drinking-milk time.