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Profile: lazarius
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User Name: lazarius
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, August 27, 2016
Last Visit: Sunday, July 5, 2020 11:26:59 PM
Number of Posts: 775
[0.08% of all post / 0.55 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: riciculous
Posted: Sunday, July 5, 2020 2:44:24 AM
Romany wrote:
you are telling me what I "should" do.

Or shouldn't. :)

I will confess that being an erstwhile programmer my use of the word is governed by this document:

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2119

Romany wrote:
So. We try, rather, to frame surmise not as a statement/accusation, but as a question: "Do you mean you think alcohol is the cause of everything bad?" or "That sounds to me as if you think..." "Are you one of those people who think drink is the root of all evil?"

Thank you. I'll think it over.

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Topic: riciculous
Posted: Saturday, July 4, 2020 9:02:10 AM
RayMidge wrote:
I presume these are typesetting errors committed in the original publication of these texts, not OCR errors. The OED has no entry for "riciculous."

Thank you very much!

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Topic: riciculous
Posted: Saturday, July 4, 2020 9:01:35 AM
Romany wrote:
I would tend to think any instances were just print-setters blunders.

Thank you very much!

Romany wrote:
And print-setter were renowned for the amount of alcohol they used to drink on duty!

One shouldn't attribute everything bad to drinking - so gratuitously, so out of hand.

Quote:
Half a pint of wine will make ſome men drunk, when others ſhall drink a gallon, without being the leaſt fuddled.

1766, John Truſler

Topic: riciculous
Posted: Saturday, July 4, 2020 6:48:27 AM
thar wrote:
The second one is so like the usage of ridiculous (stupid and ridiculous) that I would be inclined to call it an error.

Certainly, it is not an OCR error:



thar wrote:
olde style.

Actually I've come across it in an olde book and this is what I'm interested in most. Could it be a real word in the 18th century or I can safely assume it is an error in setting type?

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Topic: American Colonies Declare Independence (1776)
Posted: Saturday, July 4, 2020 6:21:17 AM
Quote:
The Americans freed themſelves from the Engliſh yoke, with the hopes of being delivered from anarchy and bondage; but it is oftener leſs difficult to get free, than to know we are ſo.

1795, John Truſler

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Topic: riciculous
Posted: Saturday, July 4, 2020 6:01:10 AM
What do you think of this word? It can be found both in ancient and modern books and it doesn't look like an OCR error:

https://books.google.com/books?id=GdplAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA55&dq=riciculous



https://books.google.com/books?id=bZmRAAAAIAAJ&q=riciculous



And it's found here:

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=riciculous

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Topic: shabbily/tattered
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2020 9:55:36 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
To me those are tattered jeans.

Thank you!

thar wrote:
those are carefully ripped - tattered to me would have ragged ends, not neat turn-ups
!

I'll take this into account! :)

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Topic: shabbily/tattered
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2020 8:14:20 AM
thar wrote:
There is a style of interior decorating called 'shabby chic' where you make everything look a bit old and worn over time - but not broken or ripped!

I've seen something opposite:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Women-s-Ripped-Destroyed-Hole-Jeans-Casual-Loose-Denim-Skinny-Pants/511826240



I would call these jeans tattered. Would you call 'em shabby?

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Topic: despondent
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2020 1:20:19 AM
Dr Sanchika Gupta wrote:
ok

I have memory gaps, Doc, and it makes me utterly despondent.

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Topic: dispirit
Posted: Thursday, July 2, 2020 1:39:23 AM
Dr Sanchika Gupta wrote:
ok

I have memory gaps, Doc, and they dispirit me.

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