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Profile: georgew
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User Name: georgew
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, August 13, 2016
Last Visit: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 8:53:50 PM
Number of Posts: 323
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: The movie left a lasting impression on me.
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 8:56:05 PM
Ashraful Haque Ashraf wrote:
Would it be correct to say:
"The movie left a deep impression on me."
"The movie left a lasting impression on me."

I meant to say that the movie was so good that I didn't forget it for a long time.


A "deep impression" may be a temporary thing, not necessarily long - lasting. A "lasting impression" is different and was not necessarily deep at first.

However, the two would frequently be treated as equivalent.

Topic: For all I know, he left last night
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 10:16:14 PM
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
Thank you.

Is there any practical difference between the two?


The two are common and equivalent.

Topic: paper collecting
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2020 4:54:45 PM
Ivan Fadeev wrote:
What do you call the paper products such as books, magazines and other paper products which you collect for recycling? Is there a specific word? For example, if you saw a pile of books brought to a recycling point what do you call it? I think they are not books any longer but what are they?


- used books
- pre-owned books
- books for recycling

Topic: You're welcome
Posted: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 12:00:34 AM
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
You're welcome.


All the others are slang terms. Some or many people would consider them rude in certain situations.


Especially so here, in a university classroom setting.

Topic: love for/of
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:49:02 PM
Audiendus wrote:
Ivan Fadeev wrote:
Are they interchangeable?

I have a great love for art.
I have a great love of art.

Yes, but "love of" is better here. "Love for" is used more for a person.


Agree.

Topic: has or have?
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:45:15 PM
Audiendus wrote:
Koh Elaine wrote:
1 in 4 children has/have immigrant parents.

Should it be "has" or "have"? And why?

"Has", because the subject is the singular "1" (1 child in 4).

But you will often find the plural verb used.


I would use the plural form here, because the quote refers to a group.

Topic: chances of the other events
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2020 11:37:45 PM
Audiendus wrote:
azz wrote:
a. The chances of event A happening are higher than the combined chances of the other events happening.
b. The chances of event A happening are higher than the combined chances of all the other events happening.

c. The chances of event A happening are higher than the chances of the other events happening combined.
d. The chances of event A happening are higher than the chances of all the other events happening combined.


It is better to say "The chance of event A happening is higher...". Apart from that change:

(a) is best.

In (b), "all" is unnecessary, because "the other events" already implies all of them.

(c) and (d) sound unnatural – "combined" is too far away from "chances", which it qualifies.


AGREE! Applause

Topic: Only in Malaysia can we
Posted: Sunday, November 15, 2020 12:48:49 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
"Only in Malaysia, we can be proud that prisoners are the government's advisers. This goes to show this government is so inefficient that convicts can reprimand (the government). This act has tainted the House," he added.

Shouldn't it be "Only in Malaysia can we" instead?

Thanks!


"Only in Malaysia, we can..." is grammatically correct.

Topic: I will be forever grateful vs I am grateful forever
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2020 3:14:45 PM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
I will be forever grateful for what you did for my dad and my family!
Today while wishing to one of our neighbors who helped a lot my family in India, especially when my dad was very ill. This was 2 years ago.
Is "will be" in "I will be forever..."correct ? or "I am forever grateful..." correct?


"I will be forever grateful..." is the most common form of that expression, IMHO.

Topic: raising the tution
Posted: Thursday, November 12, 2020 5:45:53 PM
Tara2 wrote:
Can you please explain the bold part?

The students object to raising the tuition.


For example, a university charges its students the amount of $100 (tuition) to attend a given class. But the university has announced it will increase that amount to $120. That was a tuition increase.

Perhaps you are confused because "tuition fees" is a bit redundant. Yes, it is. It would be clearer to simply say "tuition."