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Profile: sitifan
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User Name: sitifan
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Sunday, July 10, 2016
Last Visit: Monday, July 11, 2016 6:22:34 PM
Number of Posts: 5
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Is "flour" pronounced differently from "flower"?
Posted: Monday, July 11, 2016 12:21:53 PM
Tovarish wrote:

What country are you from sitifan?

I'm from Taiwan. My mother tongue is Hokkien. I can speak Mandarin Chinese as fluently as a native speaker. I teach basic English at a junior high school in Taoyuan, Taiwan.
You said:
I did not have a Private School up bringing, but both my parents spoke well and chastised me if I pronounce my words 'in a common way' quaint now.
Can I rephrase your sentence as follows?
I did not have a Private School up bringing, but both my parents spoke well and chastised me if I pronounce my words 'in a common way', which is quaint now.
Topic: Is "flour" pronounced differently from "flower"?
Posted: Monday, July 11, 2016 1:54:23 AM
sitifan wrote:
Tovarish wrote:

I did not have a Private School up bringing, but both my parents spoke well and chastised me if I pronounce my words 'in a common way' quaint now.

The word pronounce should be in the past here, shouldn't it?
What does quaint now mean?
Topic: Is "flour" pronounced differently from "flower"?
Posted: Monday, July 11, 2016 1:31:36 AM
Tovarish wrote:

I did not have a Private School up bringing, but both my parents spoke well and chastised me if I pronounce my words 'in a common way' quaint now.

What does quaint now mean?
Topic: Is "flour" pronounced differently from "flower"?
Posted: Sunday, July 10, 2016 9:16:34 PM
The word "flour" has one syllable and the word "flower" has two. But if one listens to NES, the pronunciations are very close to being the same. And in many cases the pronunciation is identical- many speakers do use two syllables for both despite the dictionaries' advice.

There's even a joke.

A: Men are so insensitive sometimes.
B: What do you mean! No we're not!
A: Okay, fine. What's your wife's favorite flower?
B: Umm... um... unbleached all-purpose, I think.

(For the non-cooks, that's a type of flour.)
Topic: It's HIGH time
Posted: Sunday, July 10, 2016 8:18:08 PM
1. It is (high) time (that) I went now. [universally acceptable, current English]
2. It is (high) time (that) I should go now. [old-fashioned, British English]
3. It is (high) time (that) I go now. [old-fashioned, American English]


ETA - I looked up the Grammar Logs entry and it doesn't really give an explanation as to why - just makes an assertion and says the word 'high' makes a difference.







What does ETA mean in the above sentence?