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Profile: Sarrriesfan
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User Name: Sarrriesfan
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Joined: Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Last Visit: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 5:41:54 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: bears
Posted: Monday, October 15, 2018 3:46:36 AM
Helenej wrote:
Sarriesfan wrote:
Bears here does not refer to the slang term you have referenced, it is not used as a noun here but a verb.

I thought the same at first, but then it seemed strange to me that the author uses the present tense instead of the past one. The whole narration in the novel is in the past tenses, after all. Wouldn’t it be better if it were “bore reference”?


Probably yes, but when Charles Dickens was writing the rules of grammar as we know them today had not yet been set in stone and in such older works there are often minor differences in tenses.

It's why Romany for example often advises people to study more modern works before they start on the classics, they can often confuse learners.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: bears
Posted: Monday, October 15, 2018 2:56:15 AM
Rick Bear wrote:
my english is not good, i'm still learing and working hard on it.

and i'm reading Oliver Twist and i found something difficult to understand here, i've looked up into the dictionary but still can't understand what 'bears' exactly means here.

i findout something like,

bear noun [ C ] (MAN)

​slang an older gay man who is large and has a lot of hair on his body


or does that mean somthing rude or cruel? i dont know...

could anyone be so nice help me out here please.

i'll be grateful.







'I suppose yer the new boy, ain't yer?' said the voice through the key-hole.

'Yes, sir,' replied Oliver.

'How old are yer?' inquired the voice.

'Ten, sir,' replied Oliver.

'Then I'll whop yer when I get in,' said the voice; 'you just see if I don't, that's all, my work'us brat!' and having made this obliging promise, the voice began to whistle.

Oliver had been too often subjected to the process to which the very expressive monosyllable just recorded bears reference, to entertain the smallest doubt that the owner of the voice, whoever he might be, would redeem his pledge, most honourably. He drew back the bolts with a trembling hand, and opened the door.




Bears here does not refer to,the slang term you have referenced, it is not used as a noun here but a verb.

Bears in this case means to provide evidence or to support the idea of something.

Oliver has been beaten many times in his life and by men with voices who sound similar to the one he has just heard, and he is convinced that the owner of that voice will also beat him.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: On Death of a Loving Wife
Posted: Sunday, October 14, 2018 5:11:01 PM
You have my deepest sympathies at this sad time Ashwin Joshi.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: Do the sentences have the same meaning?
Posted: Friday, October 12, 2018 2:30:06 PM
BobShilling wrote:
I'd say 'in her leg'.


I would say "on her leg" of it was a scratch on her leg by a twig or "in her leg" if it was a pain caused muscle or joint pain.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: Tagline
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 4:18:43 AM
Amybal wrote:
HI, is this line correct?

A love story between a human and a supernatural creature


It is correct grammatically although it needs a full stop at the end but it's not really a move tagline.

A tagline s a short pithy phrase that sums up the essence of a film without describing it too much.
Some examples:

Alien: "In space no one can hear you scream."
Boogie Nights: "Everyone has that one special thing."
Jaws: "You'll never go in the water again."

They are meant to intrigue you and make you want to find out about the film, but not tell you what it's about.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: Difference between baththub and shower bath
Posted: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 7:55:24 AM
In British English it's a modern term to describe a hybrid product that has both some of the features of a bath and a shower unit.

There are some in this online page.

https://www.victorianplumbing.co.uk/baths/shower-baths?Sort=BS&pgno=1&psize=33&filtSeq=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIo4-Oruf73QIVQuh3Ch1Y5AcDEAAYASAAEgKFPfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

The bath tub swells outwards at one end to give a person that is showering more space to move around in.

Although it's in use in the plumbing trade I don't know if it's in dictionaries yet, and our American friends might have a different usage.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: snivel,mucus?
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2018 9:46:13 AM
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
Call it mucus. No reason to teach a child vulgarisms when it isn't necessary. The other kids will teach him that.

And the fact that mucus can also come from other locations in the body is immaterial.


Snot is informal but I would not call it a vulgarism, we often use informal words with children rather than formal ones poo or poop rather than faeces would be another example.

The fact that snot is specifically mucus from the nose as opposed to sputum is not immaterial.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: snivel,mucus?
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2018 6:11:35 AM
I would call it snot.

This is mucus that specifically comes from the nose, mucus could be from other places in the body for example the mouth.

I would not call it snivel, snivel is the action of sniffing when you have a cold.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: Phrases describing “rain”
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2018 2:15:28 AM
I would disagree with thar although "pissing it down" is common I am not so sure it's the most common "chucking" is what I hear most but I guess it depends on who you talk to.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Topic: The Prime Minister
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 2:08:30 AM
ozok wrote:


Not sure that ‘president’ should be capitalized here in this context. Since it is not a direct address it could be any US president. Same with ‘prime minister’.



I would argue it's an American English usage, they even refer to former presidents such as Jimmy Carter as President Carter once a President always a President.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.

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