mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Profile: Sarrriesfan
About
User Name: Sarrriesfan
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
Statistics
Joined: Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Last Visit: Friday, October 30, 2020 8:29:55 AM
Number of Posts: 2,069
[0.20% of all post / 1.23 posts per day]
Avatar
  Last 10 Posts
Topic: be on a hiding to nothing
Posted: Friday, October 30, 2020 6:52:25 AM
Sorry Romany to disagree with you again this week, but it’s a phrase that is used by some people.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/be-on-a-hiding-to-nothing
Quote:
to be trying to do something when there is no chance that you will succeed


https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/on-a-hiding-to-nothing
Quote:
If you say that someone who is trying to achieve something is on a hiding to nothing, you are emphasizing that they have absolutely no chance of being successful.
[British, informal, emphasis]


To here acts like “to” in I am going to town or I am going to London, it indicates the destination.

In this case to nothing, if it was grammatical I guess it should be nowhere, but it’s a idiom and they don’t always make sense. Romany you are right in that sense it is gobbledegook I have always been puzzled by why it means what it means.
Topic: 'Look In My Eyes' Vs 'Look Me In The Eyes'?
Posted: Thursday, October 29, 2020 1:49:12 PM
Subha007 wrote:
Two other examples:


3- The doctor looked in my eyes to check whether he could see any sign of infection.

4- The doctor looked at my eyes to check whether he could see any sign of infection.


Both are possible as there can be infection in different parts of the eye.
Posterior Uveitis is an infection of the retina at the back of the eye the doctor needs to look into your eyes at the back to see the infection.
Conjunctivitis sometimes called red eye is an infection of the front of the eye which produces a blood shot look and pus on the front and eyelashes the doctor need only look at the front of the eye.
Topic: had rather
Posted: Thursday, October 29, 2020 7:17:30 AM
Rather.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/rather

Quote:
rather
exclamation UK old-fashioned
UK /ˌrɑːˈðɜːr/ US /ˌræðˈɝː/

certainly; yes:


Yes I would agree “I’d rather it was driven home right away”, sounds natural in BrE to me.
Topic: as light as air
Posted: Tuesday, October 27, 2020 7:53:48 AM
You can say “The little girl seemed as light as air”, in the right context.



This is Hafþór Júlíus Björnsson an Icelandic strongman and actor who appeared in the TV show Games of Thrones as Gregor “The Mountain” Clegane. He holds the world record for deadlifting at 500kg.
To him a lifting a little girl is nothing.
The girl is not actually as light as air, but is in a comparative sense is.
Topic: bust or crack?
Posted: Tuesday, October 27, 2020 2:29:12 AM
FounDit wrote:
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
Hi,

Do "bust" and "crack" have the same meaning in the following?

Police cracked/busted a major crime ring.

I'd appreciate your help.


In AmE, we don't usually use "cracked" in the same sense as "busted".

We use "cracked" when we speak of the police discovering evidence of who committed a crime - which is often called "a case". The police cracked the case. That is, they discovered who is responsible.

But when we say the police "busted" a major crime ring, this usually refers to the arrest of the persons involved, not just the evidence. Busted can also refer to the conviction of the criminals if they are found guilty. So "bust" can refer to both of those - the arrest and possibly the conviction of criminals.


We have the same in usage in British English.
Topic: topper
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2020 8:54:11 PM
A slight typo there.
“It means outside” not outsiders that’s something very different.
Topic: topper
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2020 4:03:01 PM
In the open, yes it works like in a field it means outsiders
Topper is an informal word for top hat.
Yes a random brick works like a random bullet.
Topic: spoke to truth to power
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2020 8:11:27 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
Kofi Annan spoke to truth to power.
I read this online.
What we can learn from Kofi Annan

What does "spoke to truth to power"?
I don't the grammatical structure of this phrase?
I don't understand the uses of "to" used before "truth" and "power".


It’s a mistake the phrase is written as “spoke truth to power”.
It means that he reminded powerful people, presidents, chancellors, kings, queens, prime ministers and dictators etc. Of the things that they did which were in his opinion wrong or immoral.
The “to” in truth to power indicates who the truth is spoken too.
A truth is spoken.
Who is that truth directed to .
Those with power.

There is a story of the Roman Emperors who during Triumphs, victory parades would have a slave holding up a Laurel wreath above their heads, at the same time he would whisper in their ear “Momento Mori” or in English “Remember you too will die”, the ultimate truth to power.
Topic: spoke to truth to power
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2020 8:11:26 AM
Jigneshbharati wrote:
Kofi Annan spoke to truth to power.
I read this online.
What we can learn from Kofi Annan

What does "spoke to truth to power"?
I don't the grammatical structure of this phrase?
I don't understand the uses of "to" used before "truth" and "power".


It’s a mistake the phrase is written as “spoke truth to power”.
It means that he reminded powerful people, presidents, chancellors, kings, queens, prime ministers and dictators etc. Of the things that they did which were in his opinion wrong or immoral.
The “to” in truth to power indicates who the truth is spoken too.
A truth is spoken.
Who is that truth directed to .
Those with power.

There is a story of the Roman Emperors who during Triumphs, victory parades would have a slave holding up a Laurel wreath above their heads, at the same time he would whisper in their ear “Momento Mori” or in English “Remember you too will die”, the ultimate truth to power.
Topic: fell over the coffee table
Posted: Monday, October 26, 2020 7:58:17 AM
Oh yes of course Australians are past masters at it, although I am less familiar with South Africans.