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User Name: sureshot
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Wednesday, September 16, 2015
Last Visit: Sunday, January 17, 2021 7:40:52 AM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: singular verb for plural noun
Posted: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 1:22:03 AM
vipin viswanathan wrote:
The rest of the map was found.
Some of the water is polluted.

Why do they use a singular verb?

_______________

In the first sentence, "rest" has a singular sense since it refers to a singular map. This use of singular verb "was" is correct.

In the second sentence, "some" has a singular sense since it refers to the uncountable noun "water". This use of singular verb "is" is correct. It is useful to know that if "some" refers to a countable plural noun, the verb s plural as in:

- Some of the girls are dancing.
- Some of the chairs are broken.
Topic: in/on your bare feet
Posted: Tuesday, December 22, 2020 1:13:45 AM
raymondaliasapollyon wrote:
Hi,

Which preposition should I use in the following?


Don't walk around outside in/on your bare feet.


I'd appreciate your help.

____________________

Use "on". "In" is used in phrases like "in your shoes".
Topic: difficultly?
Posted: Wednesday, December 16, 2020 2:57:18 AM
Ivan Fadeev wrote:
My name is difficultly spelled.
or
My name is spelled difficultly.

___________________

"Difficultly" is an adverb of manner. The second sentence is the better option.

However, you are more likely to hear "My name is difficult to spell". You may also hear "My name is spelled with difficulty."
Topic: Is the sentence correct?
Posted: Friday, December 11, 2020 8:02:13 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
I am suspicious of your cheating me.

Is the sentence correct?

Thanks in advance.

_______________

The following sentence conveys your intended sense:

- I suspect that you are cheating me.

Here, the verb "suspect" conveys the sense "have a feeling", "have a sneaking feeling", "am inclined to think", "have a suspicion".

The adjective "suspicious" does not convey the desired sense.



Topic: Best wishes for a speedy recovery.
Posted: Thursday, December 10, 2020 5:19:31 AM
onsen wrote:
Hello,

Quote:

A. Best wishes for a speedy recovery.
wish

B. With best wishes for a happy birthday.
wish


The sentences C and D were made by changing the 'a' in the sentences A and B to 'your'.

C. Best wishes for your speedy recovery.

D. With best wishes for your happy birthday.


Are C and D acceptable?


Thank you.

______________________

Using the possessive determiner "your" as done by you is acceptable.
Topic: Lived vs. had lived
Posted: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 11:12:24 AM
coag wrote:
Hello all,

Which of the two sentences below is grammatically correct with regard to the use of the past tense of "live"? Are both sentences acceptable?

1. Fans gather outside the building where John Lennon lived.
2. Fans gather outside the building where John Lennon had lived.

_______________________

Sentence 1 is the correct sentence. The first part of the sentence is in Simple Present. It implies that it is a regular/periodical activity. The event/action before simple past should be in Simple Past Tense. There is no need to use Past Perfect Tense for an event before simple present.
Topic: Are these sentences grammatical and natural enough?
Posted: Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:09:43 AM
Dukul wrote:
Are these sentences grammatical and natural enough?



1) I haven't been logging into Facebook for one solid month because Facebook hasn't lifted the block on my account/ because of not having been lifted the block on my account.

2) The morning sun rays enters into my room and there is enough space in air circulation.

3) If you come, you can see there are a world map, a wall clock and some beautiful wall mats hung on the wall of my room.

_____________

1) I haven't been logging into Facebook for one solid month because Facebook hasn't lifted the block on my account

Remark: The following sentence is better:

- I haven't been logging into Facebook for one solid month because Facebook hasn't unblocked my account.

2) The morning sun rays enters into my room and there is enough space in air circulation.

Remark:
1. You will come across the expressions like "rays of the sun";"sun's rays" and sun rays. TFD also mentions "sunrays" as one word just like sunlight and daylight. All the variations are correct. My personal preference is in the order stated by me.
2. "Enter into" is used in expressions like "enter into an agreement/contract, enter into discussions/negotiations (with somebody).
3. More natural wordings are:

- The first rays of morning sunlight stream though the window of my well ventilated room.
- The morning sunlight streams though the window of my well ventilated room.
- The first rays of morning sunlight stream though the window of my room which has good air circulation.
- The morning sunlight streams though the window of my room which has good air circulation.


Some more variations are possible.

3) If you come, you can see there are a world map, a wall clock and some beautiful wall mats hung on the wall of my room.

Remark: The following sentence is better:

- If you come to my room, you can see a world map, a wall clock and some beautiful wall mats hung on the wall.






Topic: Is "it" missing?
Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 1:34:31 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
The suffix “tion” (also Latin), has several meanings, but here is being used to mean (depending on the situation) “the act of doing something”, “the state of being something”, or “the effect of something”.

Should there be an "it" between "here' and " is"?

Thanks!

____________________

In standard English, the expression is : "... but here it is ...". "It" is the subject of the verb "is"
Topic: Keep chipping away at it
Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 1:26:06 AM
Dukul wrote:
▪What does "keep chipping away at it" mean? Please provide some example sentences.


________________

The basic phrase is "chip away at". You will find both the meaning and example sentences by looking up the following:

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/chip-away-at
https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/chip-away
https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/chip-away-at


I hope this helps.
Topic: I am looking for a unique pair of shoes.
Posted: Monday, November 23, 2020 6:54:16 AM
tautophile wrote:
There are some words where you have a choice. You can say "a hotel" or "an hotel", but in the first case you say the /h/ in "hotel" (/a ho-tel/), and in the second case you don't (/an oh-tel/). Both pronunciations of "hotel" are acceptable, but the /ho-tel/ pronunciation is more usual these days. "Heroic" and "historic" are two other words--derived from French--where there is a choice between "a" and "an".

____________

It is clarified that the mentioned tip pertains to the letter "U". It does not pertain to other letters. So, the rule pertaining to "h" is not applicable for the letter "u".