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Profile: Herman, the German
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User Name: Herman, the German
Forum Rank: Newbie
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, September 12, 2015
Last Visit: Tuesday, May 12, 2020 6:01:26 PM
Number of Posts: 26
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: a woman walking her son on/with a wheelchair
Posted: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 8:18:33 PM
FounDit wrote:
danyaaa wrote:
I saw a woman walking her son on/with a wheelchair, trying to calm him down due to his suffering with Tourette's syndrome.

on Or with????

Thank you

Both sound wrong. She could neither walk him on a wheelchair, nor in a wheelchair because he couldn't walk at all if he needed a wheelchair.

You would have to say "I saw a woman walking beside/alongside her son, who was sitting in a wheelchair, trying to calm him down due to his suffering with Tourette's syndrome."




Well, I'm neither a native speaker, nor very knowledgeable about Tourette's syndrome, yet to me the sentence would make more sense reading:

"I saw a woman pushing her son in wheelchair, trying to calm him down due to his suffering with Tourette's syndrome."


Pushing the wheelchair may just describe the situation more accurately than walking alongside.

If the son is unable to walk because of the uncontrollable movement due to the Tourette's syndrome, moving the wheelchair on his own might as well be hard to do.
Topic: Association game
Posted: Friday, January 22, 2016 1:44:49 PM
association
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Monday, September 21, 2015 7:49:43 AM
unleashed
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Sunday, September 20, 2015 4:27:58 PM
grayscale
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2015 4:05:56 PM
preoccupied
Topic: breeches
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2015 3:26:30 PM
britches > bridges ..... breeches > breaches.

English most certainly is at times a hard language to pronounce, respectively to spell. No wonder, all over the US spelling bees are flourishing in schools and similar institutions.

Now, some people claim Finnish to be a hard language to learn. Yet, keep in mind that the language with double "A-umlauts" ÄÄ is very exact in regards to pronounciation. Quote: "Finnish is almost completely written as it is spoken ..."

(Not even sorry for the deviation, I'm far to big for my Brigids)


... and now: back to breeches /bɹiːtʃəz/, /bɹɪtʃəz/


Source: Archives of Pearson Scott Foresman, donated to the Wikimedia Foundation
Topic: Association game
Posted: Saturday, September 19, 2015 4:26:48 AM
worthwhile
Topic: breeches
Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015 9:43:23 PM
I think these are knickerbockers, not breeches. Am I right? Why would these trousers/pants have a different name, if there is no difference?


Topic: Palindromes
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2015 4:15:33 PM
Let me quote wikipedia what they know about Non-English (European languages) palindromes

Quote:
Non-English palindromes

According to Guinness World Records, the Finnish 19-letter word saippuakivikauppias (a soapstone vendor), is claimed to be the world's longest palindromic word in everyday use. A meaningful derivative from it is the word saippuakalasalakauppias (a soapfish bootlegger). An even longer effort is saippuakuppinippukauppias (a soap dish wholesale vendor), albeit somewhat contrived in its meaning (literally "a soap dish bundle vendor"). The given name for a Finnish male, "Otto Nenonen", could be combined with the previous noun(s), making the name-title combination an even longer phrase.

The longest palindrome in the Estonian language is the word kuulilennuteetunneliluuk ("a hatch from where a bullet flies out of when exiting a road tunnel"). Respectively, according to the Dutch Guinness Book of World Records, the longest palindrome in Dutch is the word koortsmeetsysteemstrook, which translates into English as "a strip of a fever measurement system".


More about palindromes in English usage: wikipedia on palindromes
Topic: FIRST AND LAST LETTERS COMES IN UPCOMING WORDS
Posted: Wednesday, September 16, 2015 3:10:51 PM
maypole