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Profile: nightdream
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User Name: nightdream
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Female
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Joined: Thursday, August 20, 2015
Last Visit: Thursday, April 2, 2020 10:18:18 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: went-2
Posted: Thursday, April 2, 2020 10:18:14 AM
FounDit wrote:
nightdream wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It's not common to just use "go/went" alone like that.

EDITED to add: As Wilmar says in your other thread, "The second went is also awkward, in my opinion."

They went on their way, and continued until dawn.
"Go" (with no destination or direction) is not a continuing verb really. When it is used just as "we went" it means "we started" not "we travelled" or "we continued".

"Go/went" is usually followed by a place, direction or point in time, not a time period.

go vb (mainly intr) , goes, going, went or gone
1. to move or proceed, esp to or from a point or in a certain direction: to go to London; to go home.
2. (tr; takes an infinitive, often with to omitted or replaced by and) to proceed towards a particular person or place with some specified intention or purpose: I must go and get that book.
3. to depart: we'll have to go at eleven.


"They went on their way and went till dawn came" doesn't sound right. "till dawn came" is a period, not a point. It sounds like it's missing a direction or destination.
The question which would be asked if you said that would be "Went where?"

"They went on their way and went towards the mountain till dawn came."
"They went on their way and went north till dawn came."


"They went at dawn" would be OK.
"They went at dawn and went on their way" is not bad, but would probably be re-phrased so that "went" is not repeated.


Thank you! Then does it sound natural:

"They went on their way and went on till dawn came"?
No. The second "went" does not sound natural. As DragOnspeaker said, it shouldn't be repeated.

A more natural way would be, "They went on their way until dawn", or "They went on until dawn".



Is it unnatural only because of the repeating the word "went"?
Topic: went-2
Posted: Thursday, April 2, 2020 5:39:11 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It's not common to just use "go/went" alone like that.

EDITED to add: As Wilmar says in your other thread, "The second went is also awkward, in my opinion."

They went on their way, and continued until dawn.
"Go" (with no destination or direction) is not a continuing verb really. When it is used just as "we went" it means "we started" not "we travelled" or "we continued".

"Go/went" is usually followed by a place, direction or point in time, not a time period.

go vb (mainly intr) , goes, going, went or gone
1. to move or proceed, esp to or from a point or in a certain direction: to go to London; to go home.
2. (tr; takes an infinitive, often with to omitted or replaced by and) to proceed towards a particular person or place with some specified intention or purpose: I must go and get that book.
3. to depart: we'll have to go at eleven.


"They went on their way and went till dawn came" doesn't sound right. "till dawn came" is a period, not a point. It sounds like it's missing a direction or destination.
The question which would be asked if you said that would be "Went where?"

"They went on their way and went towards the mountain till dawn came."
"They went on their way and went north till dawn came."


"They went at dawn" would be OK.
"They went at dawn and went on their way" is not bad, but would probably be re-phrased so that "went" is not repeated.


Thank you! Then does it sound natural:

"They went on their way and went on till dawn came"?

Topic: 3 options
Posted: Thursday, April 2, 2020 5:38:03 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Just looking grammatically, I'd agree with Wilmar that only #1 works very well.
The other two would easily be understood in conversation, but #2 and #3 say that the people are in a language family.

I'd add #1a. Peoples whose languages are in the Germanic/Mongolic language family ...



Thank you. They would be understood, but are they natural?
Topic: 3 options
Posted: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 8:25:53 PM
tautophile wrote:
Option 1 ("Peoples who speak languages in the Germanic language family..." or "...in the Mongolic language family...") is the best of the three.

The Germanic language family is an offshoot of Indo-European, includes English and Lallans or Scots, Dutch and Flemish and Frisian, High and Low German, the Scandinavian languages such as Icelandic, Faroese, Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish; and the extinct Gothic language.

The Mongolic languages are not related to Germanic or other Indo-European languages, or with Sino-Tibetan languages like Chinese. The chief Mongolic language is of course Mongolian, but there are a number of other languages and dialects spoken chiefly in and around Mongolia.


Thanks, but I'm interested in the remaining 2 options.
Topic: 3 options
Posted: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 8:02:10 PM
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
Someone else will come along and talk about this again, but I would remind, I believe, that people don't belong to language families -- languages do.


Thanks, but what is about the third option?
Topic: went-2
Posted: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 8:00:54 PM
Wilmar (USA) 1M wrote:
Someone will come along and explain in great detail, I'm sure. In the mean time, I would offer the following to suggest that there is some phrasing involved, rather than a simple string of words.


...went on their way...
---- Idiom, found in TFD
on your/the/its way (redirected from on their way)
on the way
1. En route; currently traveling to someone or something.
We're on the way to the party and should be there in five minutes.
2. Found along the route to someone or something.
It looks like there is a gas station on the way.


...went on till dawn
went on (past tense of go on)
Go on used this way means to continue. ...continued till dawn.



Thanks, but I asked about what would be if I omit "on":

They went on their way and went till dawn came.


Topic: 3 options
Posted: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 6:53:02 PM
Are all the options natural and acceptable to use?


1/ Peoples who speak languages in the Germanic/Mongolic language family ...

2/ Peoples who belong to the Germanic/Mongolic language family ...

3/ Peoples of the Germanic/Mongolic language family ...
Topic: went-2
Posted: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 6:51:51 PM
"They went on their way and went on till dawn came" - does it make sense?


What would be if I omit "on"? - "They went on their way and went (on) till dawn came"?

I'm interested in how would change the sense if I omit "on" and wrire just "went":


They went on their way and went (on) till dawn came.
Topic: other/another
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2020 8:17:54 PM
What is the difference between "another one", "other one" and "the other one"?
Topic: went
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2020 7:13:46 PM
nightdream wrote:
"They went on their way and went on till dawn came" - does it make sense?

What would be if I omit "on"? - "They went on their way and went (on) till dawn came"?



I'm interested in how would change the sense if I omit "on" and wrire just "went":

They went on their way and went (on) till dawn came.