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Profile: Ashwin Joshi
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User Name: Ashwin Joshi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: Male
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Joined: Wednesday, August 3, 2016
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 4:25:10 AM
Number of Posts: 1,613
[0.16% of all post / 1.04 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Sentence with 'see'
Posted: Wednesday, October 28, 2020 4:24:53 AM
The first sentence is correct.
Second should be
I saw he was watching TV.

I saw him while he was watching TV.
Topic: show vs showed
Posted: Sunday, May 24, 2020 10:41:08 AM
English is a continually changing language, Koh.
Topic: International tracking of the COVID-19 invasion: an amazing example of a globalized scientific coordination effort
Posted: Sunday, May 24, 2020 12:14:40 AM
"The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is no universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide from 1918-1919. In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States. Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic. While the 1918 H1N1 virus has been synthesized and evaluated, the properties that made it so devastating are not well understood. With no vaccine to protect against influenza infection and no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections that can be associated with influenza infections, control efforts worldwide were limited to non-pharmaceutical interventions such as isolation, quarantine, good personal hygiene, use of disinfectants, and limitations of public gatherings, which were applied unevenly.
The Spanish flu pandemic started in 1918. By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed an immunity.
Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes enabled the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs and clear the way for bacterial pneumonia.
Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly. A flu pandemic from 1957 to 1958 killed around 2 million people worldwide, including some 70,000 people in the United States, and a pandemic from 1968 to 1969 killed approximately 1 million people, including some 34,000 Americans.
More than 12,000 Americans perished during the H1N1 (or “swine flu”) pandemic that occurred from 2009 to 2010. The novel coronavirus pandemic of 2020 is spreading around the world as countries race to find a cure for COVID-19 and citizens shelter in place in an attempt to avoid spreading the disease, which is particularly deadly because many carriers are asymptomatic for days before realizing they are infected.
Each of these modern-day pandemics brings renewed interest in and attention to the Spanish Flu, or “forgotten pandemic,” so-named because its spread was overshadowed by the deadliness of WWI and covered up by news blackouts and poor record-keeping.
In spite of the research, the WHO has not been able to invent any vaccine against the attacks of such unexpected, very dangerous
enemies."

Source : CDC
Topic: International tracking of the COVID-19 invasion: an amazing example of a globalized scientific coordination effort
Posted: Friday, May 22, 2020 10:53:55 AM
Yes Hope123, mankind has taken giant leaps in many fields. With the advent of the internet, new methods and the speed with which the news travels have improvised exponentially. And so is research and measures devised to contain the spread of the dangerous virus. It has been labeled pandemic. But I disagree. Pandemics were the Spanish flu, the Great Plague of London. The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is no universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide from 1918-1919. In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States. Mortality was high in people younger than 5 years old, 20-40 years old, and 65 years and older. The high mortality in healthy people, including those in the 20-40 year age group, was a unique feature of this pandemic. While the 1918 H1N1 virus has been synthesized and evaluated, the properties that made it so devastating are not well understood. With no vaccine to protect against influenza infection and no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections that can be associated with influenza infections, control efforts worldwide were limited to non-pharmaceutical interventions such as isolation, quarantine, good personal hygiene, use of disinfectants, and limitations of public gatherings, which were applied unevenly.
The Spanish flu pandemic started in 1918. By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed an immunity.
Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes enabled the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs and clear the way for bacterial pneumonia.
Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly. A flu pandemic from 1957 to 1958 killed around 2 million people worldwide, including some 70,000 people in the United States, and a pandemic from 1968 to 1969 killed approximately 1 million people, including some 34,000 Americans.
More than 12,000 Americans perished during the H1N1 (or “swine flu”) pandemic that occurred from 2009 to 2010. The novel coronavirus pandemic of 2020 is spreading around the world as countries race to find a cure for COVID-19 and citizens shelter in place in an attempt to avoid spreading the disease, which is particularly deadly because many carriers are asymptomatic for days before realizing they are infected.
Each of these modern-day pandemics brings renewed interest in and attention to the Spanish Flu, or “forgotten pandemic,” so-named because its spread was overshadowed by the deadliness of WWI and covered up by news blackouts and poor record-keeping.
In spite of the research, the WHO has not been able to invent any vaccine against the attacks of such unexpected, very dangerous
enemies.
Topic: Is the hard shut-down a bad idea?
Posted: Wednesday, May 13, 2020 2:40:04 AM
We totally are, at the mercy of the virus. It cannot be a hundred percent avoided. This way or that it has the capacity to reach our homes.
Topic: Is the hard shut-down a bad idea?
Posted: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:14:14 AM
There is a lot of discussion in countries with lockdown about its being good or bad. The governments have resorted to this measure on the advice of scientists and epidemiologists to save the spread of the deadly virus. So many rats have come out of their burrows to discuss the belling of the cat. But, unfortunately, no solution. Similarly, lot of discussions will not yield any results. Let anybody come with an alternative solution to save the humanity.
Topic: issued (with)
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 11:46:46 AM
The store was given verbal warnings but its premises continued to be overcrowded at about 7.15 pm later that day and was issued an advisory letter.
I will write it as follows;

The store was issued verbal warnings, but its premises continued to be overcrowded till about 7.15 pm later that day, hence, was issued an advisory letter. IMO
Topic: on or in
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 11:37:49 AM
'in' is correct. "on" is on the seat, the roof, the table, the head, the shoulders and ....
Topic: How to learn English?
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2020 11:25:34 AM
Hi jerryOO,

Welcome

I spent an era to learn the English language. Follow the following steps.

1) Watch English newsreaders on TV for pronunciation and construction of sentences.
2) For vocabulary, download the Dictionary.com app. Consult it every time and each time a new word comes that is not known to you.
3) Never hesitate to speak English.

And last but not the least, there are few hard rules to speak English,(even native speakers cannot converse in good English, slangs overrule), but rules do prevail to write good English.

Start speaking right now. Shed diffidence.

Topic: It's Not the Virus that Scares Me.
Posted: Thursday, April 2, 2020 10:46:32 PM
Hope123 wrote;

The fear also is that powerful men (and it is usually men) try to take advantage and seize more power during a crisis, as has happened elsewhere in the world.


But the one who showers loads of good luck is a lady i.e.Lady Luck

"But all anyone can do is take precautions and hope Lady Luck is with us". (Hope123 in a previous post)