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Profile: robjen
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User Name: robjen
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Joined: Tuesday, February 17, 2015
Last Visit: Friday, April 20, 2018 2:57:55 AM
Number of Posts: 466
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: usage of attenuate
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 2:57:55 AM
According to www.freedictionary.com, to attentuate has several meanings

1. To make slender, fine, or small
2. To reduce in force, value, amount, or degree; weaken
3. To lessen the density of
4. Biology To make (bacteria or viruses) less virulent.
5. Electronics To reduce (the amplitude of an electrical signal) with little or no distortion.


I am trying to learn how to use Definition 2. I am going to make up a sentence with it below.

(ex) A lack of regular exercise and well-balanced diet can attentuate your immune system.


Am I using the second meaning correctly? Thanks a lot.
Topic: Start with the past tense and continue with the present tense
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 2:51:51 AM
I am going to make up a sentence below.

(ex) I told John that he needs to do more research on flu viruses before he can write a well-supported paper.

I did the telling some time ago, which is in the past tense. It's still true that he has to research the topic further, which is in the present tense.

Is it OK to have two different tenses in my sentence? Thanks a lot.
Topic: a long time from now vs long from now
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 2:44:25 AM
(1) Your next planned trip is a long time from now.

(2) Your next planned trip is long from now.

In (2), I omitted "a" and "time". Does it make sense without the two words?

Thanks a lot.
Topic: get a perfect score
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 2:38:31 AM
I am sure it's correct to say:

(1) You got a perfect score.

If the listener knows you're talking about test scores, can you say:

(2) You got perfect.

Thanks for your help.
Topic: usage of the verb "to abominate"
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 6:02:58 PM
The online dictionary www.thefreedictionary.com defines that to abominate means to dislike intensely.

I think it's a very strong word. I am going to make up two sentences below.

(1) Farmers abominate heavy snowfall and strong wind because they destroy their crops.

(2) Heavy snowfall and strong wind are abominated because they destroy farmers' crops.

Am I using the verb correctly? Thanks for your help.
Topic: What's wrong with the verb forms?
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 4:32:33 PM
(ex) John is going shopping for a while and plans to visit his uncle after that.

Some of my non-native English speaking friends think there is a problem with the verb forms. They say "planning" should be used.

I think they are wrong. What do you think? Thank you for your help.
Topic: ran out of copies of these books, the book ...
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 4:27:43 PM
I have written down four sentences below.

(1) I ran out of copies of this book.
(2) I ran out of copies of these books.
(3) I ran out of these books.
(4) I ran out of this book.


I think (1) suggests I don't have any more copies of one specific book.

(2) means no more copies of all the books I am talking about.

(3) can be interpreted in the same way as (1) or (2).

I think (4) is grammatically wrong.

What is your opinion? Thanks a lot.
Topic: Do I need to repeat "photos"?
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 5:09:56 AM
I have written down a question below.

(1) During my long trip, I took photos of interesting places in Paris, photos of special fruits in Mexico and photos of my relatives in London.

(2) During my long trip, I took photos of interesting places in Paris, of special fruits in Mexico and of my relatives in London.

(3) During my long trip, I took photos of interesting places in Paris, special fruits in Mexico and my relatives in London.

I am repeating "photos of" in (1) and "of" in (2) and have no repetitions in (3)?

Which one is grammatically correct? Thanks a lot.
Topic: long vs for long
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 4:26:43 AM
Is there a difference in meaning between "long" and "for long"?

If they have different meanings, how do you use them?

Thanks for your help.
Topic: Can you split compound verbs with "each"?
Posted: Friday, April 13, 2018 4:24:41 AM
(1) We have each been given two rewards for their volunteer services.

(2) We will each be writing two essays next week.

Is it OK to split compound verbs with "each"? Thanks.

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