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Profile: robjen
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User Name: robjen
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Tuesday, February 17, 2015
Last Visit: Monday, July 16, 2018 4:44:08 PM
Number of Posts: 554
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: meaning of disconnected
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 4:28:20 PM
I have heard of these sentences with "disconnected"

(1) My phone is disconnected from your call suddenly.

(2) My call is disconnected suddenly.

(3) I am disconnected from your call suddenly.

(4) I have disconnected your call.


Do the people who use these sentences mean by "disconnect"?

Thanks a lot.
Topic: a strong memory or a strong recall
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 4:18:19 PM
(1) The eighty-year-old man has a strong memory or recall of his childhood.

(2) His childhood memory or recall is becoming weaker as he is getting older.


I am not sure which word fits better. Please help me. Thanks a lot.
Topic: A bus braked suddenly
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 4:12:48 PM
My friend witnessed something when he was on the bus. This is what he said to me.

(ex) A bus braked suddenly and the passengers fell on top of each other. Some of them swore at the driver, who replied, "Don't blame me, but an idiot in front of me who doesn't know how to drive. Had I not stopped in time someone would surely have ended up in hospital."

He asked me if there is a better way to rewrite his paragraph. He could not remember exactly what the driver said. Some of the words in the quote were not the driver's words.

My non-native English friends and I learn English from one another. I really cannot think of a way to improve his paragraph.

Do you have any suggestions?

Thanks a lot.
Topic: ice cream in or with different flavors
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 3:58:24 PM
(1) The store sells ice cream in or with different flavors.

(2) The ice cream comes in or with different flavors.

My non-native English speaking friends and I think both "in" and "with" work. Do you agree with us?

Thanks a lot.
Topic: Can you relate "apart" to a time measure?
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 3:35:52 PM
(1) My house and my workplace are two kilometers apart.

(2) My house and my workplace are one hour apart.

I am sure (1) is correct.

Is it OK to relate "apart" to time in (2)? Thanks.
Topic: away relates to time not distance??
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 5:16:47 AM
I am very confused about the use of "away". Two native English speakers said "away" refers to time, NOT distance. They gave me a few examples.

(1) We are ten minutes away from getting home. (OK)

(2) We are ten blocks away from getting home. (wrong)

(3) We are ten minutes away after leaving our company. (OK)

(4) We are ten blocks away after leaving our company. (wrong)

They said the reason is that an action verb like "getting" is used. It's more appropriate to relate the action to time than it is to distance.

I am really confused about that.


Could someone clarify this further?

Do you agree with the two native speakers?

Thanks a lot.

Topic: for six hours from 10am to 4pm
Posted: Monday, July 16, 2018 5:04:38 AM
(ex) You need to work for six hours from 10am to 4pm.

Is it OK to say "for six hours from ... to ..."? Thanks.
Topic: the full December
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 9:58:29 PM
Not long ago, I heard a store owner say this to me.

(ex) My store will be closed for the full December.

"full December" sounds odd to me even though I am not a native English speaker. How does it sound to native speakers?

Thanks.
Topic: to be on you
Posted: Sunday, July 15, 2018 9:55:30 PM
I have heard people use "is on you" in sentences like the ones below.

(1) I advise you not to do that. However, the final decision is on you.

(2) I cannot look after my grandfather next week because I have to travel. The responsibility will be on you.


It seems to me that a lot of people use "to be on you". Is it grammatical? Thanks a lot.
Topic: Why is there "does" in the sentence?
Posted: Saturday, July 14, 2018 11:53:07 PM
I got the sentence below from somewhere. I don't remember where it came from

(ex) To do this well requires skill no less than does a competent physical exam.


(1) Why is there "does" in the sentence?

(2) Competent means capable of doing something well. But, it doesn't seem to fit the sentence. Is there another meaning of it?

Thanks a lot.

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